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Jayne Williams brings irreverent wit and a passion for movement to people who want a roadmap to real-life, functional fitness. Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete is the antidote to fitness books that promise killer abs and deliver disappointment.A mediocre athlete with a lifelong weight problem, Williams struggles with her own fitness demons, including self-consciousnesJayne Williams brings irreverent wit and a passion for movement to people who want a roadmap to real-life, functional fitness. Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete is the antidote to fitness books that promise killer abs and deliver disappointment.A mediocre athlete with a lifelong weight problem, Williams struggles with her own fitness demons, including self-consciousness, injuries, and yo-yo dieting. Now, she puts fun back into working out with realistic advice, zany anecdotes, and essential observations. With stories from other “imperfect athletes,” Williams’s fifty audacious tips help aspiring athletes of all flavors to kick butt on the trail, in the pool, or at the gym....

Title : Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete: 50 Ways to Kick Butt on the Field, in the Pool, or at the Gym--No Matter What Your Size and Shape
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781569243916
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete: 50 Ways to Kick Butt on the Field, in the Pool, or at the Gym--No Matter What Your Size and Shape Reviews

  • Helen
    2019-03-23 13:59

    Although Williams is primarily a triathlete, her book is really for anyone looking for inspiration on their journey to fitness. According to her this book is for “real people with jobs and kids and love handles”. As a plus-sized athlete, she advocates concepts like abandoning self-consciousness, being slow, embracing bodily fluids, and becoming an active wear advocate. She asks her readers to examine their motivations for losing weight and to change their focus to being fit.In Chapter 44, titled “Be a Pit Bull”, Williams says “You’ve got your jaws clamped on to the pants leg of your dreams, but you get shaken around, tossed and buffeted by life. You have setbacks, you have bad weather, you have injuries. You want to quit. You want to lie on the couch. You want to let go. But as a pit bull, you don’t let go. Ever.”Williams freely admits that she is “a large woman; sometimes very large, sometimes just pretty large”, making this book different from many other health and fitness books. Her parting words implore her readers to “pick one small thing [she:] talks about in these pages, and do [her:] a favor. Go out and do it tomorrow.” Do me a favor too. Read this book, then pick one thing Williams talks about. And go out and do it tomorrow.

  • Alyssa
    2019-03-23 13:58

    I really liked this author's take on fitness: don't work out to lose weight or because you "have to" - do it because it feels good! She recommends that you dare to wear lycra no matter what your size, and I (now) think that's awesome!

  • Teri-K
    2019-03-27 10:11

    OK, this is now my favorite book about exercising in the motivation/devotional category. (I call it a devotional because it's a great book to read a bit of every day not because there's any spiritual element to it.) I really enjoyed the author's attitude, her openness and the encouragement she dishes out. I read it in 2 days and then began reading it a bit at a time every day. It's really encouraging, will helps you examine your attitudes and feelings, and remind you of why you're out there running - or doing whatever exercise you pursue. (And it's NOT about looking skinny or fitting in a certain size jeans. That motivation won't be enough to get you through the tough times.) I love her emphasis on having fun and being proud of yourself. I liked it enough that I've tracked down a copy of her other book, and look forward to reading it when it arrives.

  • Christina
    2019-03-23 08:05

    This was a highly motivating fitness book without being overbearing. Ms. Williams is not the average fitness advocate who you will see yelling at people to shape up on TV. She is like the rest of us. I wake up each day and get myself to the gym before 6:30 five days a week, but I am overweight. At one point I lost 50 pounds but over time I gained all that back sitting at a desk for 8+ hours a day. My story is very similar to hers. Most of us struggle with our weight and Ms. Williams gives the reader various ideas of how to start a fitness journey, mix up your fitness routine, or find the best fitness clothes for your body (to name a few). This book relates quite a few stories of her fitness friends who may not fit the mold of the perfect athlete. Most people begin their fitness routine and go all out and as a result they get burnt out. Williams suggests that fitness beginners start with small manageable goals, gradually increase intensity or distance, and track their progress. She also encourages the reader to find an event or major fitness goal and gradually train for that event. She encourages endurance over performance. Williams advises the reader to avoid cotton clothing while working out, and makes it her mission to scorn those fitness stores that do not carry workout clothes for larger women. How are we supposed to get fit without quality fitness clothing? She also includes another great piece of advice: our bodies can become accustomed to a routine and as a result, burn less calories. The best approach is to vary your workout. I was stuck on the elliptical machine for the last 6 months and I felt like I was getting nothing out of it. This month I began walking and jogging on the treadmill and I have a whole new set of muscle pains. To me this is good. I like to feel that there may be some result of my workout. I will make sure to find a new routine next month. I am prone to disagree with Williams on a couple of points. First, she encourages the reader to exercise outside. I am a gym junkie. Up here in the frozen north, the weather is not good for exercise almost 8 months out of the year. I have really bad allergies and walking outside can make me sick for a couple of days. I do exercise outside but it is not my top priority. She also encourages the reader to put aside distractions when exercising, such as books, magazines, and iPods. What??? If someone told me I could not bring a book to the gym, I would stop going. Gym time = me time = book time. Overall I enjoyed the book (which I read on the treadmill and exercise bike!) with all of its practical advice and straight forward manner. It has given me some new ideas and I may even try ice skating for the first time in the upcoming weeks!

  • Elizabeth
    2019-03-23 08:58

    Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete by Jane Williams (pp. 288)Looking for insight into triathlon training, Williams was well reviewed for her Slow Fat Triathlete books on Amazon. Our library system had this one. I expected a little more insight on how to juggle the schedules and training regimes, but got mostly a motivational guide written in thematic sections that could easily be lifted from any running magazine. The snarky tone was annoying at first, but it found a balance in later sections. Hearing motivation from a woman who has finished multiple triathlons, races, hikes, and adventure trips while maintaining an average 250 lb. benchmark weight provides, forgive the word choice, weight to her words which may not resonate from a glossy magazine feature of low-body fat pros. She pushes the joy of movement and getting out there. She’s very succinct about making the “Who are you trying to impress?” point. There isn’t a lot of new material, but some of the info finding gear for larger or larger busted women is a useful resource. Directing the reader to some of the other successful tri program coaches that she’s used and respects is also useful. I would have preferred a little more about the ins and outs of programs she’s followed, but a lot of her message is just get out there and do it your way. For the title, that feels like a cop-out. And for the reviewers from Amazon who gave it such high reviews, I wonder if the higher reviews come as a high-five or Facebookof the author over the substance itself.

  • Elizabeth
    2019-03-24 06:24

    Shape Up with the Slow Fat Triathlete by Jane Williams (pp. 288)Looking for insight into triathlon training, Williams was well reviewed for her Slow Fat Triathlete books on Amazon. Our library system had this one. I expected a little more insight on how to juggle the schedules and training regimes, but got mostly a motivational guide written in thematic sections that could easily be lifted from any running magazine. The snarky tone was annoying at first, but it found a balance in later sections. Hearing motivation from a woman who has finished multiple triathlons, races, hikes, and adventure trips while maintaining an average 250 lb. benchmark weight provides, forgive the word choice, weight to her words which may not resonate from a glossy magazine feature of low-body fat pros. She pushes the joy of movement and getting out there. She’s very succinct about making the “Who are you trying to impress?” point. There isn’t a lot of new material, but some of the info finding gear for larger or larger busted women is a useful resource. Directing the reader to some of the other successful tri program coaches that she’s used and respects is also useful. I would have preferred a little more about the ins and outs of programs she’s followed, but a lot of her message is just get out there and do it your way. For the title, that feels like a cop-out. And for the reviewers from Amazon who gave it such high reviews, I wonder if the higher reviews come as a high-five or Facebookof the author over the substance itself.

  • Candy
    2019-04-10 06:18

    A friend of mine suggested this book to me after learning I'd been on a fitness journey for the past 9 months. I've lost a lot of weight, I've gotten in a shape that is a little less "round" and I still have a long ways to go. I was looking forward to reading this book to learn how to get into shape and become an imperfect athlete as a larger woman. There are oddball challenges that I've met along the way that smaller people just don't have. I was looking forward to learning about how to deal with some of these.I will say that the book is very motivational and I love the author's attitude of "be yourself and the rest of them can fly a kite." Reading her book made me want to get off my tail and drag my butt out for a walk or to the gym. It made me want to learn how to run and succeed at this crazy path I have laid out for myself. She excels at this.I think, however, it's missing some of the practical advise I was looking for. I was expecting more tips and ideas and less motivation. Granted, I need both of those things, but from the title and description, it wasn't quite what I was expecting.Having said that, this is definitely worth a read. If you are not in the best shape of your life and don't look all that hot in spandex, this is a great book to help get your tail in gear. Recommended.

  • Helen
    2019-04-13 05:59

    Although Williams is primarily a triathlete, her book is really for anyone looking for inspiration on their journey to fitness. According to her this book is for “real people with jobs and kids and love handles”. As a plus-sized athlete, she advocates concepts like abandoning self-consciousness, being slow, embracing bodily fluids, and becoming an active wear advocate. She asks her readers to examine their motivations for losing weight and to change their focus to being fit.In Chapter 44, titled “Be a Pit Bull”, Williams says “You’ve got your jaws clamped on to the pants leg of your dreams, but you get shaken around, tossed and buffeted by life. You have setbacks, you have bad weather, you have injuries. You want to quit. You want to lie on the couch. You want to let go. But as a pit bull, you don’t let go. Ever.”Williams freely admits that she is “a large woman; sometimes very large, sometimes just pretty large”, making this book different from many other health and fitness books. Her parting words implore her readers to “pick one small thing [she:] talks about in these pages, and do [her:] a favor. Go out and do it tomorrow.” Do me a favor too. Read this book, then pick one thing Williams talks about. And go out and do it tomorrow.

  • Linsey
    2019-04-19 12:04

    Slow Fat Triathlete is one of my favorite books, so when Jayne Williams published this book, I knew I had to read it.I enjoy Williams writing- she not only has a great sense of humor, but she also writes honestly-she I appreciate. For in imperfect athlete like myself, its nice to read a fitness book from someone who is not feeding the reader the lies you see in so many books, like "oh, just to this every day and you will be skinny and happy". Instead, Williams preaches sweating and moving should be fun- and you should seek out activities that you enjoy and that make you feel stronger, healthier and more limber. She believes that you should be empowered- no matter your size of shape or ability to do the sports you enjoy doing. For me, a lot of this book was reinforcement of stuff I already know and agree with. However, I still enjoyed reading it because the author is funny. I suggest this book to anyone who wants some motivation or advise on how to get started on their dreams of becoming a more active, healthy adult and who enjoys a good laugh.

  • C
    2019-04-13 08:20

    The idea behind this book: "get out and do it, stop waiting to miraculously be skinny first" is solid gold. How many things do we put off because we think we don't look perfect? She urges you to accept you will never be perfect. Let it go. Give it up. And go have fun.Putting off life in favor of a fantasy is the dumbest thing we could do to ourselves. Logically most of us know this, but we're still trapped by our fears and dreams. We buy into myths about how we look, and what people notice. Because of this, we rip ourselves off of the joy we could be experiencing of just...living life. She says it in a gentler way, granted, but the underlying message is: stop being so stupid.Actually she says it in a much gentler way, and speaking from her own experiences. She has great advice on self-consciousness, clothing, psyching yourself up, challenging yourself, starting and keeping with a fitness program. My impression: down to earth, common sense advice from someone who is human, has been there, and is not Hollywood skinny. Yay!

  • Lisa
    2019-04-08 14:14

    I enjoyed her message of getting rid of self-consciousness as you try to get fit. When running outside or working out in a gym, it is easy to worry what other people are thinking of you. But odds are everyone is just worried about what everyone else is thinking of them. So let it go and find something you enjoy. It's a good guide to starting out.

  • Christine
    2019-04-21 06:04

    I liked this book- so fun to read about training in a fun entertaining way. I loved that she encouraged me to think like an athlete and be proud of every little thing I do and not wallow in all the training I haven't rocked! It was encouraging and I learned a few things- a good read for anyone but especially for anyone attempting to tap into your inner athlete!

  • Kathie
    2019-03-26 11:00

    As a new runner, I wanted to learn more about triathlons and thought this would be a good read as a novice. I loved this book and could relate to it on many levels. It's realistic, funny, motivating, inspiring. All around a fun read. And yes, I learned all that I needed to help me to decide whether I could do it or not, well wanted to do it or not. She showed me I could.

  • Melanie
    2019-04-03 11:09

    Very funny... motivating... Makes me realize that persistence is the key to success... She captivates people by taking care of themselves no matter what shape or form. It's no wonder why I've done so many endurance events.

  • Mari-louise
    2019-04-16 10:58

    Inspirational - love Jayne.

  • Tori
    2019-04-19 06:22

    Fun motivation and some good, basic advice.

  • Spook Harrison
    2019-04-14 08:13

    Amazingly motivational and inspirational without ever becoming preachy, I think every woman should read this one!

  • Jamie Hodges
    2019-03-22 07:19

    Very motivational. Signed up for a triathlon. Think of her tricks to keep me going

  • Meg
    2019-04-11 11:02

    fitness for the fun of it, entirely reasonable

  • Darcy
    2019-03-22 13:21

    Not so much tips for your body as for your brain. Step 1: Go!

  • Kim
    2019-04-13 10:20

    A really good, common sense, kick-in-the-pants/self-esteem-boosting guide.