Read The Dwelling Place of Light by WinstonChurchill Online

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Winston Churchill (1871-1947) was an American novelist. He attended Smith Academy in Missouri and the United States Naval Academy, where he graduated in 1894 and became an editor of the Army and Navy Journal. He resigned from the navy to pursue a writing career. While it is claimed that his first novel was The Celebrity, published in 1898, a question arises where his novelWinston Churchill (1871-1947) was an American novelist. He attended Smith Academy in Missouri and the United States Naval Academy, where he graduated in 1894 and became an editor of the Army and Navy Journal. He resigned from the navy to pursue a writing career. While it is claimed that his first novel was The Celebrity, published in 1898, a question arises where his novel called Mr. Keegan's Elopement should be placed, because it was published two years earlier in (1896) within a magazine. Later in 1903 it was republished as an illustrated hardback book. His next novel called Richard Carvel, was published the next year. It was a phenomenon, literally selling by the box-car as many as two million copies in a nation of only seventy- six million, and that book made Churchill rich. His next two novels, The Crisis (1901) and The Crossing (1904), were also very successful. In 1917, he toured the battlefields of World War I and wrote about what he saw, his first non-fiction work. Sometime after this move, he took up watercolours, and also became known for his landscapes....

Title : The Dwelling Place of Light
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781406595383
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 384 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Dwelling Place of Light Reviews

  • David
    2019-03-26 10:45

    Winston Churchill is a master in painting color with words. His descriptions of the mill town, the mill workers, the lightness, the darkness, are incredible. It is well worth reading this book to see how he paints a beautiful picture with just words.With that said, this story is about labor, labor strikes, the rich, the poor. It takes place in two small towns of Hampton Ma, and Silliston, MA. In all reality, this is a story of the 'Bread and Roses' strike of 1912 that took place in Lawrence, MA. This book is a fictional story of historical facts with an interesting interplay between the using of workers and the using of women for gain and pleasure. It is really very well done. I am very pleased to have found the works of Winston Churchill and highly recommend his works to anyone who enjoys a good story with deep, symbolic meanings.

  • Larry Piper
    2019-04-14 06:26

    Well, first of all, I should point out the common confusion regarding the author of this book. Originally, even GoodReads had the actual author listed incorrectly. The author is Winston Churchill, the American writer who was born in St. Louis and who lived in Cornish, NH (surrounded by a bunch of my in-law relatives, no doubt. I wonder if he ever got a taste of Aunt Grace's awesome "Blueberry Goop"?) for most of his life. He was a cousin of the former British Prime Minister, Sir Winston S. Churchill. They agreed to distinguish themselves from each other by having Sir Winston use his middle initial. Bless the GoodReads librarians for clearing this up for us all. Second of all, the nitwits at Amazon claim this book is only 226 pages. It's actually more like 400 pp. I don't know why Amazon can't hire someone competent to make up a decent page-count algorithm, but they can't. They're generally way off with their "real page numbers", often comically way off. One would think that even a not-very-bright 12-year old could come up with a better page count algorithm than the so-called engineers at Amazon. But, naturally, they don't care about quality, just "marketing and moving product". Ok, now on to the book. It's a good one. Not an all-time classic, but well worth one's time. The book is generally considered to be a story of labor unrest. The mill workers in a small industrial city in Massachusetts are about to have their pay cut. They begin to talk strike and operatives of the IWW (Industrial Workers of the World or Wobblies) move into town and begin to organize the strike. It gets contentious and ugly over time. The basic story line of the strike follows the historical outline of the so-called "Bread and Roses" strike in the mills of Lawrence, MA in 1912. It makes sense that Churchill would use history to provide background for his story. His primary fame is as a writer of historical novels. I also see it as a coming-of-age chronicle about an intelligent young woman who was born into a good family, but, because of her father's fecklessness, her immediate family—including her mother, father and somewhat wild younger sister—were living at the level of poverty common to the mill workers a century ago. Her father, in fact, had fallen to the ordinary mill-worker level, being the gate keeper at one of the mills. The young woman is a hard working, competent stenographer, and is motivated to become independent. She has neither the background nor the role model to support a woman's independent living. For the most part, it wasn't done a century ago. So she has to figure out things for herself, making mistakes along the way. It's really a fairly compelling book and very well written. The book is full of "modern" ideas, modern for a century ago, but many still ones with which we wrestle today. You will also recognize that the disdain the mill bosses have for the mill workers continues to be echoed in the sneers of the likes of Mitt Romney and Paul Ryan in their political posturing today. Nothing much changes it seems. It's the fourth or fifth Winston Churchill book I've read, and I wonder why he isn't still read today. I have yet to find a book of his that isn't a GoodRead.