Read Revolutionary Nonviolence: Essays by David T. Dellinger Online

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One of the remarkable men, staring off with "Statement on Entering Prison" (1943) & ending in 1970 with "Statement Before Sentencing on Anti-Riot Conviction". During WWII Dellinger went to jail proclaiming that "all war is evil & useless." This collection of short essays from 1943-69, many of which originally appeared in Liberation magazine, bear witness to a quartOne of the remarkable men, staring off with "Statement on Entering Prison" (1943) & ending in 1970 with "Statement Before Sentencing on Anti-Riot Conviction". During WWII Dellinger went to jail proclaiming that "all war is evil & useless." This collection of short essays from 1943-69, many of which originally appeared in Liberation magazine, bear witness to a quarter century of pacifist protest & civil rights activity. An abiding humanism is central to his tactics & tenets: no pig-hater he: "The only way we can begin to break the vicious circle of blindness, hatred & inequality is to combine an uncompromising war upon evil institutions with an unending kindness & love of every individual--including the individuals who defend existing institutions." But he never forgets where his sympathies ultimately lie: better to resist oppression violently than not at all. Visits to & vindications of N. Vietnam, Cuba & Peoples China are relatively scrupulous affairs, since he makes point of seeking out opposition elements & asking embarrassing questions of the authorities. The bulk of the essays report & analyze movement developments right up to the Chicago police riot of '68. He closes with a comparison between the indictment of the Chicago conspirators & Hitler's attempt to discredit Communists in the Reichstag Trial....

Title : Revolutionary Nonviolence: Essays
Author :
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ISBN : 9780672508707
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 390 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Revolutionary Nonviolence: Essays Reviews

  • Erik Graff
    2019-01-29 13:51

    Reading David T. Dellinger is like reading the works Mohandas Gandhi addressed to Anglo-Americans regarding his pacifist philosophy. Although sympathetic to many revolutionary movements utilizing physical force to achieve humane ends, both maintain that soul force is superior. As a young man, very concerned about and opposed to the United States' invasion of Vietnam, but very uncomfortable with hurting anyone, I found their arguments to be of great interest and went so far as to join The War Resister's League and subscribe to Liberation magazine.I probably saw Dave several times both in Washington, D.C. during the two demonstrations I attended there against the Vietnam war and in Chicago during the 1968 Democratic National Convention and during the demonstrations that followed during the Conspiracy Trial, but never actually was introduced to him. The only defendants I knew personally were Froines and Weiner, the two academics of the lot.Years after reading this book, needing shelf space, I divested myself of paperbacks. This title ended up at the Book Nook in Sawyer, Michigan.

  • P.J. Sullivan
    2019-02-13 14:04

    My notebooks are rich with quotes from this book. Dellinger had unorthodox views on many issues, including World War II, Korea, Vietnam, electoral politics, capitalism, militarism, Cuba, prisons. Whether or not you agree with his views, they are worth considering, if only because they are so different from the standard versions.He contends that the attack on Pearl Harbor was deliberately provoked by the U.S. Navy, on orders from Washington; that “Hiroshima and Nagasaki were atomized at a time when the Japanese were suing desperately for peace.” Dellinger agrees that Hitler's international fascism is an evil that needs to be resisted, but not “under the leadership and by the methods of big business, big government, and the military.” He recommends instead tactical nonviolence such as strikes, sabotage, slowdowns, free presses, and noncooperation, as practiced by countries like Norway, Holland, and Belgium. These essays were written for Liberation Magazine, which Dellinger published. Those which are a bit dated are of historical interest. They will debunk some of the things you learned in school, and that is reason enough to read this book.