Read The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream by Mary Romero Online

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2012 Americo Paredes Book Award Winner for Non-Fiction presented by the Center for Mexican American Studies at South Texas College Selected as a 2012 Outstanding Title by AAUP University Press Books for Public and Secondary School Libraries This is Olivia's story. Born in Los Angeles, she is taken to Mexico to live with her extended family until the age of three. Olivia th2012 Americo Paredes Book Award Winner for Non-Fiction presented by the Center for Mexican American Studies at South Texas College Selected as a 2012 Outstanding Title by AAUP University Press Books for Public and Secondary School Libraries This is Olivia's story. Born in Los Angeles, she is taken to Mexico to live with her extended family until the age of three. Olivia then returns to L.A. to live with her mother, Carmen, the live-in maid to a wealthy family. Mother and daughter sleep in the maid's room, just off the kitchen. Olivia is raised alongside the other children of the family. She goes to school with them, eats meals with them, and is taken shopping for clothes with them. She is like a member of the family. Except she is not. Based on over twenty years of research, noted scholar Mary Romero brings Olivia's remarkable story to life. We watch as she grows up among the children of privilege, struggles through adolescence, declares her independence and eventually goes off to college and becomes a successful professional. Much of this extraordinary story is told in Olivia's voice and we hear of both her triumphs and setbacks. We come to understand the painful realization of wanting to claim a Mexican heritage that is in many ways not her own and of her constant struggle to come to terms with the great contradictions in her life. In The Maid's Daughter, Mary Romero explores this complex story about belonging, identity, and resistance, illustrating Olivia's challenge to establish her sense of identity, and the patterns of inclusion and exclusion in her life. Romero points to the hidden costs of paid domestic labor that are transferred to the families of private household workers and nannies, and shows how everyday routines are important in maintaining and assuring that various forms of privilege are passed on from one generation to another. Through Olivia's story, Romero shows how mythologies of meritocracy, the land of opportunity, and the American dream remain firmly in place while simultaneously erasing injustices and the struggles of the working poor.A happy ending for the maid's daughter Hector Tobar's profile of Olivia for the LA Times...

Title : The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780814776421
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 267 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Maid's Daughter: Living Inside and Outside the American Dream Reviews

  • Emily
    2019-01-15 05:15

    Interesting sociological study of a woman who was raised as the daughter of a live-in maid in LA in the 1970s and 1980s. I have never read anything by this author before, but I recommend the book to anyone interested in class and cultural issues that arise from employing household "help." This is particularly interesting juxtaposed with The Help by Kathryn Stockett.

  • Vicky Mckay
    2019-01-15 11:00

    This is an interesting look at what it is like to be caught between, not only Hispanic and white culture, but upper class and lower class culture. The young woman is treated almost like a member of the family. They even pay for her to go to her kids school. Amazingly, enough she finds it difficult. to fit into Hispanic culture after she has been to college. All of these upper class people don’t seem to have any culture, heritage, or values. All they are concerned about is making money.I noticed similar things growing up in my family. Everything revolved around studying so I could get into a good college and then get a good job. Though apparently they were lying to me partially because the real reason for me to go to college was not to get a degree and a good career, but to get my Mrs degree.I read this book because my adopted daughters are Hispanic. I am worried especially that my younger daughter will feel caught between two worlds. It is a struggle teaching her values because. I feel that the values I was taught revolves around materialism. I am trying to teach her that education is a part of life and that it is a life long pursuit. As far as the cultural thing is concerned we are both trying to figure it out as we go along.Oh yes this book is true and not a novel. Sorry, I read this book about six months ago and cannot remember the young woman’s name. I just got so involved in writing that I didn't want to go back and look. I am not sure if I can save this and then go back and add to this.

  • Donabilla
    2018-12-28 03:52

    At the beginning I was sympathetic with Olivia. I felt her pain and understood what she was trying to say. What I was unable to understand is, why was she feeling this angry toward the people she lived with, who looked to me liked they really cared and loved her. She was so racist to them, not the opposite as she claimed. I felt that she was and still injustice to the family who raised her. If she wanted to blame anybody she should of blamed her own mother who took all the choices for her. She is the one who Olivia should be angry with.I read this for a qualitative research course. I think that the author did a great job in her ethnographic study. She spent more than 20 years documenting Olivia's story. This case study highlights some of the problems that live-in domestic maids suffer from. However, when you read the book, just keep in mind that this is one person's story and don't generalize it as the story of all live-in domestic help.

  • Lisa
    2019-01-02 11:21

    Non-fiction - A fascinating read about Olivia, a woman who grew up in a southern California upscale gated community in the late 60's and 70's. Her mother was a single woman who, through her networking, entrepreneurial, and negotiating skills, was a successful bread winner for a large family however most people only knew her as "Carmen, the maid." The author, Mary Romero, presents Olivia's experiences as "the maid's daughter" as well as her experiences as daughter of Carmen, respected provider of her family in Mexico. Olivia experiences reflect the many conflicts in her life because she does not fit into the employers family or with her family in Mexico. The author ties in the experiences of others to show the universal truths Olivia experiences.

  • Arcelia
    2019-01-24 07:58

    I really wanted to like this book but it ended up being more academic/sociological than a story. The book has many anecdotes interspersed throughout but it really is at its core an academic book. All that to say, when the story gets told its very interesting & made me think a lot about privilege & how it influences opportunities. When the story gets told I really enjoyed it, when it gets on theory then I got frustrated- didn't want to be back in a sociology class from college.

  • Ashley Lucas
    2019-01-24 03:04

    Romero's book is one of the best, most readable works of sociology I've ever read. It's a fascinating critique of the myths surrounding domestic labor. If you are troubled by all the buzz surrounding The Help, read this book for a more realistic take on the notion that privileged families treat domestic workers "like one of the family."

  • LSC-University Park SLRC
    2019-01-16 09:21

    Available through Lone Star College's EBSCO Ebook Collection.

  • Thing Two
    2019-01-15 03:22

    Mary Romero spent over twenty years researching Mexican-Americans in the US. During the course of her research, she came to know one young woman who was being raised by her mother and her mother's employers in a gated community in California. Very interesting read.

  • Justine
    2019-01-02 07:16

    My review will be in the next issue of the Journal of the Motherhood Initiative.

  • Ab
    2019-01-14 09:15

    One does not need to be a maid's daughter to be able to relate to and understand the reality of intersecting forms of oppression. This book decentralizes the reader.

  • Jackie Blackburn
    2019-01-06 04:13

    Fantastic novel. It really helps you to look at the world from another perspective, and brings a lot of attention to issues that often aren't seen or talked about.

  • Chriss
    2019-01-17 05:02

    Fantastically appropriate for all children straddling the lines.