Read Thinblade by David A. Wells Online

thinblade

When second son Alexander Valentine loses his brother to an assassin’s arrow, he discovers that his family protects an ancient secret and reluctantly finds himself at the center of the final battle of a war that was supposed to have ended two thousand years ago. Pursued by the dark minions of an ancient enemy, Alexander flees to the mountain city of Glen Morillian where heWhen second son Alexander Valentine loses his brother to an assassin’s arrow, he discovers that his family protects an ancient secret and reluctantly finds himself at the center of the final battle of a war that was supposed to have ended two thousand years ago. Pursued by the dark minions of an ancient enemy, Alexander flees to the mountain city of Glen Morillian where he discovers that he is the heir to the throne of Ruatha, one of the Seven Isles, but before he can claim the throne he must recover the ancient Thinblade. Seven were forged by the first Sovereign of the Seven Isles and bound to the bloodline of each of the seven Island Kings in exchange for their loyalty to the Old Law. Each sword is as long as a man’s arm, as wide as a man’s thumb and so thin it can’t be seen when viewed from the edge. Thinblade is the story of Alexander’s quest to find the ancient sword, claim the throne of Ruatha and raise an army to stand against the enemy that has awoken to claim dominion over all of the Seven Isles....

Title : Thinblade
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 11698192
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 328 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Thinblade Reviews

  • David
    2019-01-10 05:37

    Ok, so I'm pretty biased about this one, because I wrote it. Naturally I'm going to give my own book five stars. I'd love to know what you think about it.

  • Dave Neuendorf
    2019-01-18 03:35

    The Old Law: "You have a right to your life because you are alive. You have a right to your liberty because you have free will. You have a right to your property because it is the product of your labor. You forfeit these rights when you take them from another.”This is the principle that Alexander, the main character, is chosen to defend. An evil arch mage, Phane, has been in statis for 2,000 years, but is now awake. He rejects the Old Law, along with any other forms of decency. Alexander must stop him, and re-establish the rule of the Old Law.The novel is very well written, with very few jarring errors. Alexander is a thoughtful person who learns from his mistakes, and agonizes over the loss of life that is necessary to accomplish worthwhile goals in war. There is a good romance between Alexander and a ranger princess. The magic system is more reasonable than most. Alexander has to figure out how his own magical powers are different from other wizards, in order to fully use it.When I originally wrote this review, I didn't remember anything to warn parents about. Upon further reflection, there is a fair amount of sword wielding violence. Also, Phane feeds a young woman to some demons. I guess I've become hardened to this kind of thing, so it wasn't terribly memorable to me. The story promotes good morals, but does depict some actions inspired by bad morals. With this caveat, I recommend it for YA fantasy readers, but not most children.This is the first in a series, so there's plenty of reading to come.

  • Dave
    2019-01-20 03:41

    I was curious about this novel, since it received good grades (or stars, if you wish) and looked a like a solid tale of epic fantasy. I have to say, this book is an enigma. There is so much not good about it, but somehow I kept turning the pages and finished it fairly quick. Let's start with the good: Thinblade is carried by its pace. With the exception of one segment - I'll get there when discussing the bad - the story kept propelling forward at a fast pace. Not breakneck speed, but just a good pace and almost non-stop tension. The main characters are sympathetic, the worldbuilding and magic is quite interesting and the writing style is fairly smooth, although far from perfect. Now the bad: a lot of the elements in Thinblade are cliche. The main characters are either very good or very bad. No room for grey here, very black and white. Even worse, the protagonists are Gary Stu's and Mary Sue's. The story is a standard good, young and largely clueless hero, who has to quickly discover his magical powers in order to save the world from the evil overlord, an archmage. Part of the story seems to be inspired on video games, where the hero finds magical items in hidden vaults, and takes potions to recuperate from terrible wounds or to shield from blades. The writing contains plenty of holes from a technical perspective. Very little 'show don't tell', and quite a few unnecessary long descriptions and info dumps. The worst part for me was a scene where a bard basically gave a recap of the first part of the novel to a crowd, but also to me, the reader.Having said all that, there is plenty to like in this novel. I guess cliches are cliches for a reason.

  • Josh Thomas
    2019-01-05 10:50

    After reading some of the negative reviews I feel kind of bad to have enjoyed this book. I've read the entire series to date and feel that though the writing was not the best it wasn't so bad as to make me hate the book. Or want to vomit as one reviewer stated. The story is a common theme for the genre but has plenty going for it to make it a fun read especially for a buck or two. It is no Mistborn or Riyria Revelations by any means but it was a great ebook find to kill some time. I'll be picking up th next book in the series and will be expecting to be entertained by some light fantasy reading where the good guys win.

  • Férial
    2018-12-26 04:44

    Ah. What to say except that I had to choose between a 2 stars rating and a 3 stars one. Why did I finally rate it the way I did ? Mmm...let's start with the weak points.First, the telling felt a bit awkward at times (like that fight with the man that was not a man. "The man that was not a man parried a stroke but the guard succeeded in hitting the man that was not a man but then the man that was not a man did this and that, etc, etc...Well, the article "he" or the "zombie-man" thing could have done the job).Then there were a lot of repetitions (Jack's speech at Ruatha. Gah. Did we really have to go over Alexander's adventures ? Again ? We'd been reading them for over 50% of the book).Finally, there were a lot of descriptions. I like descriptions, I do. But one must keep them at a bearable level. I found myself skipping paragraphs...So why 3 stars (which is a good rating) ? Because I realize that I care for Alexander and his close followers. Yes, okay, I didn't fear for them or anything because, you know, when someone was hurt (and nearly dead sometimes), there was always that magical potion which saved the day...er...the man (or the girl). But I like that. I like it when someone can get magical things out of their bag at will (and there's plenty of that in this book). I like it when magic is plentiful and I even like a bit of deus ex machina. More than a bit actually but I like it all the same.I also very much liked this idea of 2 thousand-year-old dead wizard helping the rightful heir over time to defeat a nasty and overconfident mortal and cruel enemy.So. The next course of action will be to read the second book of this series because I truly believe that there's something very very interesting hidden under the flaws and I want to explore that.

  • Kathleen
    2019-01-24 06:45

    2.5 stars for this first book -- a fantasy novel with pervasive romantic elements (endlessly we're told of her piercing green eyes, his glittering golden eyes). Told in 3rd person, the tone is a mismatched mix of bloody intense grim-dark and jolly-rangers (joy and mischievous grins all around). I'd rate it PG-13: no sex, no cussing, but bloody, with human sacrifice. Excellent narration by Derek Perkins.The author has a vivid imagination and shows promise. THINBLADE is carried along to some extent by its magical world-building and — even more — by its pace. Rarely a dull moment. Despite an unsophisticated writing style (see below), the story moves forward at a consistent pace. The main characters and supporting characters are likable and convivial (if too flat). The hero, Alexander, began as a 24-year-old rancher with no training in magic or politics. With a token attempt at character development, he quickly became a confident, courageous, and wise king, giving orders to military generals as if he'd planned battle strategies all his life. The villains are flat. I'm hoping Jattan develops into someone interesting. Lots of potential for character development with him.As for plot, I like the premise. Archmage Barnabas Cedric, who lived 2000 years ago, put into motion (before his death) a series of signs, tests, trainings, and "gifts" so that our hero Alexander could finish killing the guy that Cedric failed to kill. The villain is Archmage Phane Reishi, who has been magically kept alive in sleep status for 2000 years. He is awakened in the first chapter, and from then until the end, it's a rush to kill him (except for a whole bunch of people who -- strangely enough -- want to crown this evil puss-head and kill Alexander, instead). Decent premise, but the author's writing style bears improvement. It is prosaic and slightly sermonizing /condescending. He leaves nothing to interpretation, spelling out each new step in the plot and explaining the good character of each protagonist (because we couldn't figure it out by what they did?). The author reveals far too many of the hero's thoughts and feelings. Furthermore, he repeats the same feelings and thoughts several times (a pet peeve). The characters are fairly flat. The hero is far too good. The dialogue is vapid and interspersed liberally with "he looked him in the eye" and sound bites echoed from his childhood -- teachings from " dad" in the form of brief proverbs. Vocabulary is sometimes anachronistic (mom and dad, gravity, adrenaline, "man up" and "you guys"). I like his descriptions of castles and mountains, but they do go on too long.Still, I've read far worse. I may try book 2, given the price. The setting feels like old Europe, complete with kings, castles, nobles, bards, guild houses, and guild masters. Fantastical elements include wizards and familiars, wisps, demons, nether wolves, fairies, ghosts, shades, etc. See my reading status updates for my thoughts about specific excerpts from the text.

  • Christine
    2019-01-02 04:53

    In "Thinblade", Mr. Wells has put together the bones of what could be a very good story - but unfortunately the book is weighed down by many issues that constantly pulled me out of the novel with raised eyebrows.The biggest problem with Thinblade's structure is that the novel is ostensibly written from Alexander's perspective, but everyone and everything has their feelings, motivations, and inner thoughts laid out plain to see at all times. I'm not referring to Alexander's ability to see auras, but to situations where Alexander is the narrator and yet I'm reading lines like "Isabel nodded with genuine joy and excitement. She was proud of Slyder and happy to show him off." This is in the middle of a scene that's clearly from Alexander's perspective. Off-key moments like this happen repeatedly, creating a novel where the reader is told nearly everything and shown very little.Speaking of Isabel, the "romance" that develops between her and Alexander is poorly done - I can believe they have a crush on one another, but Alexander asks her to marry him within days of meeting her! And we are, again, shown very little of the interaction that would make this romance believable. Characterization in general is lacking, with very little nuances to any character; but the inexplicable romance stood out.Modern terms invade the text, breaking the flow - "these guys", "mom", "dad", etc. At some point we get a vaguely preachy statement from Alexander about how he and Isabel decided to "wait until they're married". Which is just fine and dandy except that it's a very modern sentiment in a novel where I'd either expect them not to wait because they could be dead tomorrow, OR for the subject to not even be in question for cultural or traditional reasons.Alexander quickly becomes far too powerful in a short time, and as another reader pointed out his increased strength and a number of the healing sequences in the books bear a resemblance to video game-style leveling up or healing.This could have been a good book but instead it's kind of a "meh" book because of the problems above.

  • Geekritique
    2019-01-23 04:01

    This is the worst book I've read all year. Perhaps the worst I've read ever, I can't really remember. I stopped reading mid-chapter 8 because it got to the point where nothing in it brought me any enjoyment. In comparison, this makes Christopher Paolini's Eragon seem like the most creative work in decades.To recap, the dark lord that's been dead for 2000 years is awake, which triggers an ancient spell that tells literally everyone on the planet he's back. Aside from the main characters, nobody seems to care. The protagonist of the story, Alexander is already highly proficient at Magic, and weaponry. So is his entire family, except his older brother who dies on the first page. In fact his parents are masters in the art. Oh yeah, our hero just realized that he's the chosen one, and heir to some lofty throne or whatever. He gets sat down by his entire family, and a few random dudes from around town so that they can explain he's the chosen one that has to defeat the dark lord. I am not exaggerating. This is the happenings within the first 3 chapters.By the fourth chapter we get a random POV chapter of the enemy who's just evil for no reason.There are healing potions.The characters aren't redeeming, and the situations are ridiculous. I really wanted to finish this to give an honest review. But it was painful. Truly, truly painful. None of the situations could ever happen naturally. It felt like it was written by a computer algorithm of every D&D game ever played. Nobody should read this. And to think there are 7 books in the series.

  • Christina (A Reader of Fictions)
    2018-12-25 05:59

    Amount Listened to: 48%It's not a good sign when a fantasy novel doesn't spark any imagination. Everything about Thinblade is cliched. No element of the plot or world building didn't remind me of something else I've read in the genre. The characters are cardboard cut outs. The hero has absolutely everything come easily to him, making his journey exceedingly boring. The writing is also repetitive, telling you how things are over and over rather than showing you.The killing blow was when over eight hours into the novel, a bard relates to some nobles Alexander's journey up to that point. HE REPEATS EVERYTHING THAT HAS HAPPENED FROM THE VERY BEGINNING IN A MATTER OF MINUTES. Now, this scene makes sense, but ordinarily it would happen off screen, since the reader is going to be justifiably disgruntled to find that they could have started the audiobook eight hours and thirty minutes in and had the exact same understanding of the book as they do from having listened for all those hours.This is not good fantasy.

  • Susan
    2019-01-23 08:39

    Thinblade by David A. Wells Upon the unexpected death of his brother,  Alexander becomes the heir to an unlooked for birthright. He is heir to a throne, but before he can claim that right, he must first recover one of the ancient Thinblades. Friends and allies assist Alexander upon his quest even as a myriad of evil doers work to thwart him.The story started off strong with Alexander and his siblings seeing to protecting livestock from local predators. When an assassin’s arrow takes his brother, Alexander then gets told the family secret: they are the line of succession to an ancient throne. It’s a pretty heady thing to dump on a person who is just coming into adulthood. The action starts up early on in the story as Alexander, his sister Abigail, and their tutor and healer Luki flee the family estate.The action weaves in and out of quieter moments. There’s weapons training, battle planning, a bit of romance, and some magic learning. At first, it was a pretty good mix, holding my attention without giving me battle fatigue. However, once Alexander dives into learning magic, there are chunks of the story that slow way down and get a bit tedious. I wanted to fast forward through most of these sections. Having one or two to show the reader how much effort the main character is putting into it is cool; having several, nearly back to back, was over kill.At first, there’s only one female character (Abigail) but she’s right there with her brother riding and fighting. She’s good with a bow. She’s well written. Later, we get a few more female characters. Isabel is the daughter of a lord whose lands neighbor Alexander’s family. She’s also good with a bow and has a magical connection with a small hawk, which she uses as a kind of scout. Sometimes she is well written, and sometimes she falls into cliches. Alexander treats her with a kind of respect even as he very quickly falls in love with her. I felt the romance was forced, like the author felt he had to check that box off in order to have a complete epic fantasy. One of the cliches involves a kidnapped female who ends up weeping on her savior’s shoulder once she is rescued. Sigh…. I would have kidnapped Alexander and forced him to carry the firewood and water skins.The world  building is pretty standard for epic fantasy. I liked it and it worked for the story, but nothing special stood out about it. I enjoyed the quest in general, even if things got bogged down here and there. The Thinblade is a near myth even among the learned and wise. Indeed, it will take someone special to find one of these remarkable blades, and even more special to wield it with results.Luki was one of my favorite characters. He had more than one role in the story and I liked this multi-dimensionality. Throughout the tale, he plays the cook, the teacher, the healer, or the alchemist. He’s a wealth of knowledge and also the confident to Alexander and Abigail. He also has a sense of humor.Where this book shines is with the antagonists. Oddly, I found them more interesting than Alexander. Prince Faine of the Rishi has arisen and he means to conquer all of the seven isles. He’s been in this kind of suspended animation for hundreds or thousands of years and he’s not fully sane. This makes him unpredictable not just to the good guys, but also to his own baddie team. Then there is Patel. This dude scares me for several reasons. He’s dedicated, a true believer in where he has chosen to put his loyalty. He’s very, very skilled at what he does. Because he has such a sense of dedication and loyalty, he may turn out to be one of those characters that will sacrifice all to accomplish their commander’s goal even if he knows it is wrong. Yeah. He’s that kind of baddie. The sections with this characters were some of my favorites.Narration: Derek Perkins did a nice job. Most of the book is told through Alexander’s eyes and Perkins had a nice young man’s voice for him. I liked his rougher voice for Patel and his somewhat mischievous voice for Luki. His crazy Faine voice was a little chilling! His lady voices were OK, perhaps needing a little more femininity. 

  • Susan
    2019-01-08 10:59

    Upon the unexpected death of his brother, Alexander becomes the heir to an unlooked for birthright. He is heir to a throne, but before he can claim that right, he must first recover one of the ancient Thinblades. Friends and allies assist Alexander upon his quest even as a myriad of evil doers work to thwart him.The story started off strong with Alexander and his siblings seeing to protecting livestock from local predators. When an assassin’s arrow takes his brother, Alexander then gets told the family secret: they are the line of succession to an ancient throne. It’s a pretty heady thing to dump on a person who is just coming into adulthood. The action starts up early on in the story as Alexander, his sister Abigail, and their tutor and healer Luki flee the family estate.The action weaves in and out of quieter moments. There’s weapons training, battle planning, a bit of romance, and some magic learning. At first, it was a pretty good mix, holding my attention without giving me battle fatigue. However, once Alexander dives into learning magic, there are chunks of the story that slow way down and get a bit tedious. I wanted to fast forward through most of these sections. Having one or two to show the reader how much effort the main character is putting into it is cool; having several, nearly back to back, was over kill.At first, there’s only one female character (Abigail) but she’s right there with her brother riding and fighting. She’s good with a bow. She’s well written. Later, we get a few more female characters. Isabel is the daughter of a lord whose lands neighbor Alexander’s family. She’s also good with a bow and has a magical connection with a small hawk, which she uses as a kind of scout. Sometimes she is well written, and sometimes she falls into cliches. Alexander treats her with a kind of respect even as he very quickly falls in love with her. I felt the romance was forced, like the author felt he had to check that box off in order to have a complete epic fantasy. One of the cliches involves a kidnapped female who ends up weeping on her savior’s shoulder once she is rescued. Sigh…. I would have kidnapped Alexander and forced him to carry the firewood and water skins.The world building is pretty standard for epic fantasy. I liked it and it worked for the story, but nothing special stood out about it. I enjoyed the quest in general, even if things got bogged down here and there. The Thinblade is a near myth even among the learned and wise. Indeed, it will take someone special to find one of these remarkable blades, and even more special to wield it with results.Luki was one of my favorite characters. He had more than one role in the story and I liked this multi-dimensionality. Throughout the tale, he plays the cook, the teacher, the healer, or the alchemist. He’s a wealth of knowledge and also the confident to Alexander and Abigail. He also has a sense of humor.Where this book shines is with the antagonists. Oddly, I found them more interesting than Alexander. Prince Faine of the Rishi has arisen and he means to conquer all of the seven isles. He’s been in this kind of suspended animation for hundreds or thousands of years and he’s not fully sane. This makes him unpredictable not just to the good guys, but also to his own baddie team. Then there is Patel. This dude scares me for several reasons. He’s dedicated, a true believer in where he has chosen to put his loyalty. He’s very, very skilled at what he does. Because he has such a sense of dedication and loyalty, he may turn out to be one of those characters that will sacrifice all to accomplish their commander’s goal even if he knows it is wrong. Yeah. He’s that kind of baddie. The sections with this characters were some of my favorites.Narration: Derek Perkins did a nice job. Most of the book is told through Alexander’s eyes and Perkins had a nice young man’s voice for him. I liked his rougher voice for Patel and his somewhat mischievous voice for Luki. His crazy Faine voice was a little chilling! His lady voices were OK, perhaps needing a little more femininity.

  • Joby Walker
    2018-12-26 08:41

    This is a Goodreads 2 stars -- "It was OK". There are numerous hints at potential but overall the book is pretty flat though rarely becomes burdensome.The Good----------------------------World: The world has some depth and interest. Although there are a few inelegant info dumps they aren't too bad. The author also wisely doesn't explain everything (though he probably shares a bit too much) leaving more for us and the characters to learn.Description: Food, locations, people are described in great detail (sometimes a bit too much) so there is a great texture to the setting.Action: The action scenes are pretty well done -- sometimes a bit too blow-by-blow -- but pretty good. There just needs to be more and with a greater cost (see Healing Potions below)The Meh----------------------------Magic System: I love that mages aren't born to magic but develop the talent through a trial and that the more powerful mages are specialized -- no one can do everything. But other than that the system seems to be too easy. There is a cost to gaining access to use magic but there doesn't seem to be any cost to casting magic. The listing of the specialties seemed to be pulled out of D&D.Characters: While I like most of them, there is not a lot of dimension to them. Everyone gets along, follows orders, and are paragons of noble behavior. The Bad----------------------------Names: the names of the four characters that leave the mansion on the quest all start with "A" -- that makes it very obnoxious to distinguish them when starting out a book -- particularly if you don't have few straight hours to get into the story.Repetition: "He suddenly" seemed to happen a lot. And if *I* saw this it happened too many times.Alexander's Magic: He is WAY too powerful. His starting ability of being able to read people's auras is insanely powerful since he can detect lies and even people of ill intent. This quickly sets up a world of good people and bad people that he can easily identify and kill as needed. His later powers are even more insanely powerful making things just too easy.Party Interaction: There is no conflict or disagreement between the characters -- at most some very mild banter. There needs to be some dynamic within the group. Even the romance elements leave everyone happy -- brothers/fathers aren't over protective hell they seem to encourage things.Romance: Disney fairy tales have more realism in romance -- a week from meeting to engagement with zero conflict except with the unwanted attentions of a bad guy. Sad.Healing potions: There are honest to god healing potions. With an unending, so far, supply of healing, the only cost to battle is some time to heal and sleep. This makes battle cheap.Peril: There was only one point when I had some concern about the heroes, and it looked like a success had turned into a pyrrhic victory that would burden them for a while -- but no we get a series of set piece combats that have little consequence apart from which bad guys get killed off.Politics: The self-professed rancher does the perfect thing every time -- come on -- make it a challenge.The Lost Scion: An overused trope, which is weirdly used since pretty much everyone (good and bad) knows of the family.Despite a mediocre start I may get the second book -- there is some promise here and I want to encourage new Epic Fantasy authors.

  • Denae Christine
    2019-01-07 08:57

    A couple things keep this from being 5 stars. 1, a little more blood and gore than I like. 2, something I can't quite put my finger on, but it had to do with the way Alexander felt like he needed to have faith in his lucky magic to save him no matter what. A couple skirmishes seemed too easy, a couple things were predictable, and a couple creatures/events were almost too unrealistic, but overall this was a fine novel.I did try the second book (listened to it), and it wasn't as good. I don't know if this was because I waited two years or because I wasn't reading it to myself.Strong points:Characters. I could keep track of everyone, they all had differences, and they were likable. Even the bad guys were interesting. I liked that we see Alexander's and Abigail's relationship along with Erik's and Isabel's; not many fantasy stories focus on sibling friendships. Oh, and the romance was delightfully subtle and didn't distract from the plot.World. Very epic, large scale, different climates and cultures, feasible governance systems, and a valley of pink trees. There were assassins, magical potions and weapons, traveling bards, a mage's guild, and handy Rangers.Plot. Not predictable. Okay, a tiny bit. Parents are removed, as are the family home and all sense of safety. There is a lot of running and being hunted paused by some intense fighting, some recovery time, and some vital conversations and lessons. Alexander has to gain the allegiance of all of Ruatha, and he goes about it in, well, an effective way. Some people are devious, and some are good natured. I liked that about this book, as opposed to some stories that only focus on how evil and selfish everyone is at their core. Bah. Every story needs an Adele. :)Weak points:A typo or two. A couple conflicts seemed resolved too easily The pacing was fine, but some of the fights distracted from the main point (how many random mythical creatures do they need to go up against?). Alexander almost seems too perfect (remarkable powers, strong sense of duty and morals, and his plans always work).Yet, there were a couple times when he said something scathing or selfish and Lucky or Anatoly corrected him. I love it when characters get reprimanded and bravely face their wrongdoing and make it right.

  • Phillip
    2019-01-05 10:54

    Once I got passed the authors obsession with hot buttered biscuit and the idea the fresh cream is available out in the wilderness, I really enjoyed this book. It was a free borrow with Amazon Prime and so are all the sequels. It's one of the better books in it's price range and is better than a lot of books in a higher price range. Although the magic system is fairly standard, it is still interesting enough and the story kept me interested. The only problem I had, besides the food, was that as soon as the main character gets one more item to protect him, he somehow has his life saved by that item multiple times. He seems to get just what he needs in the nick of time. One example (not a real spoiler)...he gets an enchanted piece of armor, puts it on, and within 5 minutes has a spear, that would have gone through his heart, bounce off the armor.

  • Foxfish
    2019-01-03 10:59

    Yeah good book, I did skip a few pages every now and again but, overall I really enjoyed the story - just downloaded the second book....

  • Roderick
    2019-01-11 03:45

    I knew nothing of this book and was pleasantly surprised. can't wait to start book 2

  • Brandon Zarzyczny
    2019-01-11 05:35

    I must say that the writing in this book is definitely amateurish at times, but I still loved the story, and I already bought the sequel and started reading it. It's not a great book, but it is a very enjoyable read if you can look past Thinblade's weaknesses. I would definitely recommend this book to Epic Fantasy fans, but you may not love it.The World Building is relatively strong here, but there are some oddities which are a little goofy. I really like the magic system, it has an interesting concept where anyone that undergoes a mana-fast (where they fast for a week and drink rare magic dust in a water solution) goes through a change. This change alters the witch/wizard's connection to reality, where they can access the Firmament and through visualization and a strong will they can bring fantastical things into the real world (like giant bubbles of fire as an example). There's also interesting facets were the magic manifests in the wizard/witch in a multitude of various ways, creating many different types of magic users. For the main character's magic, he really doesn't know how to do anything, and his magic manifests itself different than everyone else. His main power in the whole book is aura vision, it provides some interesting moments where he can get an idea of the quality of character of the new people he meets, but it could also be a detriment as I almost always expected him to mention the auras of people. Then when he doesn't, I always was curious about why (especially when it was almost always the servants that he didn't comment on, even when he was being very nice to them). One of the big annoyances I have with this world's history though, is that the big events in the world that lead to the drama going on in the story occurred 2000 years ago. To me, that is too long, as their civilization hasn't evolved at all, and everyone knows what happened so long ago and are ready when the Evil Wizard Phane wakes up from his self-induced slumber. It would have made much more sense if it was only 1000 years, or even shorter. The other problem I had with the world, is that I have trouble imagining the whole picture, where there are supposedly Seven Islands, but the islands sound like they're relatively large, and from some comments they might be far away from each other. It's not too important, but I just don't have a great grasp on the geography of the world. The writing is definitely one of the weakest parts of the books, especially when you're first starting to read it. Wells uses a third person narrative, but it is a little inconsistent, where at times the narrator notes parts of the mind of other characters, while most of the time it focuses solely on the main character, Alexander. I think that I would have much preferred a first person narrative, or even a third person that was always limited to the mind of the main character. In general, the writing was a little amateurish, the words used and the grammar was just a little goofy some of the time. There were a lot of little things that broke my reading flow, but I still powered through it, and it was a relatively quick read.I will note though, that I didn't really notice many misspelled words, and it's edited relatively well for a self-published novel. I'm not sure how exactly the writing could be fixed, it's not horrible, but I know that it could be improved.The story was also a little weak at times, even though in general I loved it. It's a pretty basic epic fantasy story, a young man living on a farm (though here he was a minor noble) has his normal life changed forever as a family member is killed (not the whole family which is different). He learns that he is the chosen one, but here it is actually given a reason, where 2000 years ago the Rebel Mage that was fighting the evil Grand Mage Phane cursed a family line and set up a series of trials and gifts to give the person in the future a chance to win against the evil wizard. He gathers a group of heroes, and they go adventuring. My biggest problem with the story has to be the authors overuse of repeated enemies. Over and over the heroes kept facing and defeating (or running away from) the same enemies, and when given a chance they wouldn't finish them off. There's also a big sign for when this is happening, as every time, even after the heroes killed other less important enemies with perfect shots, the bigger more important villain is shot in the shoulder. This tactic was used way too often, and every time an enemy was only wounded, I knew that they were important and would come back later to annoy the characters.Still, some of the villains, especially the short pudgy and absolutely deadly battle mage, who I could see being part of some interesting developments in the future (he doesn't seem evil, even though he's on the wrong side) are cool and varied dangerous enemies. All of the characters in the group are relatively unique, and they have a very honest feel to them. From the tom-boy sister, to the love interest (a little forced, especially their quick betrothal, but I do like her and her interactions with Alex), to the protector, the bard, and especially the alchemist (he is a great character, one of my favs in the book). I actually thought that this book would make an excellent story in a video game, it definitely has that feel. Each of the characters has a clearly defined role, and they play it very well. The video gameness could be a weakness in the story though, as their forced limited party number causes them to be constantly pursued and outnumbered. I didn't get why they wouldn't travel with a larger party, especially when 6 of them run away from a place where they had a friendly army of almost 100,000 men so they can take on a group of 100 enemies. I'd understand if they're trying to be inconspicuous, but other times it's just goofy. Also, I think that the main characters, because they are original, enjoyable, and very hard to replace, have a certain amount of plot armor. I really can't see the author killing any of them off, as it would really suck. I do see however, the characters being constantly injured and being brought back from the brink of death by the alchemist's magical potions. So overall, I did really enjoy the book, despite its faults it was a great read. When I think about the biggest fault of the book, it's also the reason I'm going to read the sequel immediately instead of later. This problem is that there isn't a beginning middle and end to this book, there's only a series of events, where the characters keep getting more powerful. In fact, the only ending this book has is the main character finding the Thinblade. This makes me want to read the next book and find out what happens, I just hope that the next book has an end, and isn't just another, "To Be Continued Until you Buy and Read the Next Book."

  • Belinda
    2019-01-15 08:02

    An Arrow ends the live ofthe oldestValentine son. The Valentinesprotecedanacient secret. And he finds himself in the center of the final battle of a war that was supposed to have ended two thousand years ago. He flees to the mountain city of Glen Morillain where he discovers that he is the heir to the throne of Rutatha, one theseven Isles, but before he can claim the throne he must recover the acient Thinblade. He blade are a art of an Old Law and given to each of the sovereign of the seven Isles. There are seven blades.A lot of upinions have different views of this book. I do love to read it. It took me by the hand from page two. The Old Law:"You have a right to your life because you are alive. You have a right to your liberty because you have free will.... A beautiful law you can call it.I recommend to read this series of 7 books from book one. You will be taken to the seven Isles and want to dwell in this world until you finish the last page. Its a well written story about good versus evil. I did crawl into the lives of Alexander and his compenions and did fight aside them against the evil. I think it will capture you aswal and will not let you go. Alexander is a bit to brave, he could have some flaws. The bad guys are realy evil! I did keep turning the pages.

  • Den
    2018-12-31 08:54

    The use of transitions for the first half of the book was awkward though not enough of an issue for me stop reading it altogether.I constantly find myself sighing while reading this either due to how cheesy some of the scenes are and how omniscient the main character seems to be at certain points.It's enough to satiate my epic fantasy hunger for the moment but no, I won't continue the series.

  • Leserling /Belana
    2019-01-22 10:03

    This had been on my tbl list for more than six months now. I finally started listening to it, and I'm glad I did. I'm a fantasy buff, and it never ceases to amaze me that with each fantasy book I read or listen to, there are always new ideas. Well, OK, so the subject is nothing new: bad versus evil, but then you can't reinvent the wheel.The world building is nice, though, and the magic and how it is used is yet different from all I've read before.Then there are the characters. A handful of people who set out to save their world.I love Lucky the most, the alchemist mage, with his joyful nature, his amazing skills, his appreciation of good meals, and his never ending optimism.The enemy, Phane, is driven, and I wonder whether he'll be saved, or just defeated. I have six more books to find out. The narrator, Derek Perkins, is doing a great job,and it is a joy to listen.

  • Kristin Olbert
    2018-12-29 05:39

    I enjoyed it.

  • Mark Halse
    2018-12-26 07:44

    Ugh. This book! Despite the bad reviews I've had my eye on it for a while and oh did it disappoint. One dimensional characters, half baked world building and video game magic system are just a few of the shitty things about this book. This book is too new to be written in such an old school fantasy voice.Recommendation: SKIP IT.

  • Jackie B. - Death by Tsundoku
    2019-01-24 03:43

    FINALLY. I started this book in January, and I've finished it in June. This book I picked up for free on my Kindle. The only reason I picked it up is because my girlfriend's fiancee read this book. And the next one. And the next one-- and read the whole series. And this guy DOES NOT READ. So, I was curious as to what intrigued him. I discovered really quickly that I didn't particularly enjoy this book, but I wanted to finish it so I could have an intelligent conversation with him about it and recommend other books I think he might enjoy. There are a lot of things I struggled with in this book. First is the protagonist. Alexander has the wisdom of the ages and he happens to learn the right thing at the right time every time. He is far too successful for me to be interested. I don't believe that a sudden "branding" bestowed all sorts of magical skill and wisdom. Particularly when his brother received all the training, and not Alexander. It was hard to believe. The book also contains TONS of description. I don't need to know exactly what the room looks like. I don't need to know there is a dresser in the corner unless it is relevant to the story. I don't care that there are different types of marble in the columns vs. the floor. Basic description is enough.Lastly, I struggled with how things were explained. The characters had long detailed conversations, or internal monologue, about the politics and geography of the area. I didn't need all that information at once, I only need it when it's relevant. Unfortunately, I forgot all the relevant content basically immediately. It was too much.I don't think I'd recommend this book. But if you read the summary and are interested, send me a message and we will chat about alternative options.

  • Francis Schophuizen-lamers
    2018-12-27 05:58

    I liked this first book though it seems a bit flat after the RR.Martin's games of thrones. It is easy like a computergame and the passages that have been written to give the persons a bit of a soul stay a bit flat. We know that good and evil need to excist and that our hero is bound to protect the good when evil hurts it. But there is nothing wrong with an easy read with fun details which are loved by fantasypeople. Talking to animals, being a mage without knowing what you are doing and potions that get you out of trouble when you are near dead. The descriptions of the surroundings speak to the imagination and the different characters too. You want to hear Jack sing or have a look at Abigail. You would have one of the breadrolls with Lucky or see the necklace of the princess. You actualy want to see the thin side of the blade. Sometimes there is too much repetition when someone has a special ability or habit when we know someone likes food or sees an aura in page ten we need not be reminded every chapter when he sees an aura or put something in his mouth. We do know him and understand it when Lucky enjoys his breakfast dinner and lunch or when Alexander tilts his head a bit to have a look at someones aura.The fights are epic and some original ideas are fun and very handy.

  • Robin
    2019-01-10 04:00

    The best way I can describe this book is summed up in one word. Which happends to be generic. The author seems to use most of the established tropes for fantasy. While this isn't necessarily a bad thing, if not done with a spark of originality then the book becomes predictable. Despite my complaints, the book did have some positives. For one thing, I was curious enough to read the second book, which means the author's gotten me invested in his world and characters. Hopefully as the series progresses the writing becomes more polished. Like I said though the book has it's positives, if the second book holds up and makes me more curious to find out what happends, then I'll probably read the whole series. Final thoughts. I wish the protagonists faced more challenge in their quest, other reviewers have made the point that Alex seems to do everything right and that the villains are one dimentional and lacking intheir ability to draw the reader. To a large extent I agree with these criticisms, hopefully the author manages to sort out the kinks and flaws of this first novel, because if he does then this series has the potential to be great.

  • Adaram
    2018-12-31 04:55

    I found that I didn't want stop reading this book, even though I wanted to stop reading the book due to the writing style (see below). It's a great story. I wanted to know what happened. I cared about the characters. I enjoyed the plot. What more could one ask, right?Well, I am glad you asked :) On the negative side, reading through the massive amount of passive writing became a chore. My writers group would crucify this with the "show me, don't tell me" comment. I also found the story and plot almost too straightforward -- without any little mysteries or twists. It's like Mr Wells just plowed a tunnel straight through the mountain, lighting everything and giving us a complete, unadulterated view of the surroundings in once glance. It missed grey areas, nuances, and dark, mysterious shadows where hidden things might jump out and surprise us. That said, I return to my earlier comment; I didn't want to stop reading it. Further, it tempted me enough to read Book 2, and that's saying something good.It's definitely good enough to get the 4 Stars of my rating (although I would probably give it 3.5 if I could).

  • Fiona Skye
    2019-01-19 03:45

    I enjoyed this book. The story was tight, the characters relateable and interesting, if a bit cliche, and the action scenes were amazingly detailed. The only thing that kept this book from a four-star review was the writing. It was pretty obvious to me that this was Mr. Wells' first book. He got bogged down in the same trap that gets most new writers, that of too much detail. I really don't need to know the exact dimensions of a room, or a library-list description of every character, either. I understand the need for a writer to assist the reader in seeing exactly what is in his head, but sometimes a wealth of details isn't the best way to do that. Sometimes letting what's going on in the characters' heads and their reactions to the world around them is the best way. A great editor, of which this book is in desperate need, could easily point out the weak parts of one's prose and pushed this book from three to four stars.This is the first in a series and I know I'll read the rest of it. I'm interested to see how Mr. Wells' writing, characters, and plot advance. I think both the writer and the books have a lot of potential.

  • Shayla Gibson
    2019-01-05 11:40

    I don't often just quit in the middle of a book, but have to confess that I didn't finish this one.The writing was mediocre, with repetitive word choices and a lot of "telling" instead of "showing". Characters were flat and difficult to empathize with - it was like everyone was perfectly typecast with no depth. What really ended it for me though, was that I kept falling out of engagement with the story and thinking things like "so there's not been a single technological progression in TWO THOUSAND years?" "well that's unbelievably convenient" "wait - she couldn't hit a wolf on a routine hunt with no pressure, but she makes a perfect shot over greater distance at a man lying under cover with no hesitation about killing a human?" "but that's not how genetics work!". So I quit. I mean, I realize this is a fantasy story, but how am I supposed to relate to a universe where human ingenuity is so lacking that in 2000 years not only have they forgotten how to magic, they never bothered to learn how to science to replace it?

  • Caprice
    2019-01-14 10:39

    Fast paced fantasyI truly enjoyed reading this book. It was almost impossible to put down because the story is action packed with likable characters and also a love interest thrown in.Thinblade begins the story of the quest for the throne of Alexander, the unprepared and sometimes hesitant second son who is thrust into the spotlight due to the assassination of his older brother. Due to ancient prophecy, Alexander is marked with a symbol on his neck which proves he is the oldest son of the royal line that was hidden two thousand years ago and is brought to light when Phane Reishi returns to start a new war and subjugate the seven islands.I found several places in this book that reminded me of The Lord of the Rings trilogy and also to some Biblical events. It's a quintessential story of good verses evil, which action and adventure thrown in and a little magic on the side. Take advantage of the book being offered free and I am positive you will enjoy it.

  • Beth
    2019-01-04 06:02

    I really wanted to like this book, but there were a lot of things keeping it from happening. The plot was interesting for the most part, so that at least was good.The writing was so poor. There were many times I questioned whether he had an editor or not. There was just a massive amount of repetition in words and phrases. Also, most of it was just so cliché that I couldn't stand reading it for long periods of time.The characters were extremely black and white. The bad guy was bad, the good guy was good. The tale was sickeningly happy. The main character has challenges, but there is never a doubt that he'll overcome. He never even loses a single party member! They barely even get injured. He got to marry the pretty pretty princess. That was the worst part. I almost liked the book, but that scene serious came out of nowhere. Again, another way the main character succeeds in everything.