Read Kakuli: A Story About Wild Animals, Their Struggle to Survive and the People Who Live Among Them by Norman Carr Online

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Title : Kakuli: A Story About Wild Animals, Their Struggle to Survive and the People Who Live Among Them
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780797415782
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Kakuli: A Story About Wild Animals, Their Struggle to Survive and the People Who Live Among Them Reviews

  • William
    2018-12-10 10:06

    Norman Carr was a trailblazer in Zambia -- essentially creating the walking safari tourism that Zambia is known for. His legacy is a very strong one of wildlife conservation in a country that suffered badly from poaching in the late 1970s and 1980s but, particularly in South Luangwa where Carr was based, is doing very well now. The park, with Carr and his disciples leading the way, has the reputation of one of the best wildlife viewing areas in Africa. This book is essentially pulls from a series of newsletters Carr wrote in the late 80s and early 90s. Most of the book is anecdotes of wildlife scenes from the park during this time, which are interesting and educational but can be a bit monotonous. Very brief parts of the book give an insight to his philosophy that local populations must buy-in to wildlife conservation in order for it to work. I would have liked for a deeper insight on this aspect of what Carr worked on, but perhaps some of his other books are better for that.