Read The Road Through Miyama by Leila Philip Online

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Philip recounts her trip in 1983 to Miyama, at the southern tip of the islands of Japan, where she studied with a master potter. Although she was already a potter and fluent in Japanese, her two-year stay required constant adjustment to a totally different culture, described here with sensitivity and clarity. Apprentice, woman, and foreigner, she was at times put in a suboPhilip recounts her trip in 1983 to Miyama, at the southern tip of the islands of Japan, where she studied with a master potter. Although she was already a potter and fluent in Japanese, her two-year stay required constant adjustment to a totally different culture, described here with sensitivity and clarity. Apprentice, woman, and foreigner, she was at times put in a subordinate position, at other times free to do what a Japanese woman could not, such as participate in rice planting and harvesting (to the amusement of the Japanese)....

Title : The Road Through Miyama
Author :
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ISBN : 9780679725015
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 264 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Road Through Miyama Reviews

  • Rouge
    2018-12-16 18:03

    I loved this book, but mostly because it reflected a lot of my thoughts and feelings from when I lived in Japan in the early 2000s, particularly when dealing with rural area attitudes. The interweaving of her life through pottery was well written and the style reminded me more of what I'd read in japanese literature class than American literature, though I admit I don't read memoirs much. The only difficulty I had was in visualizing some of the pottery terms and the fact that the memoir isn't strictly linear. Overall, if you have interest in what life in Japan is like as well as Japanese pottery, it's a great read.

  • Barbara Figlewicz
    2018-12-16 12:14

    I picked up this book 15 years ago and started to read it, but it couldn't hold me. At that time, I was doing some Raku pottery, and I was always so fascinated by Japan, I thought I would love the book. Now I picked up the book again and it's a better read this time. Still a little slow, the details give a very interesting look at Japan outside the big cities. I don't know if the same view of women or foreigners is still held there today, but at the time this book was penned, those groups were held apart from the men and "locals" who generally set the rules for the society. In this book, we go on a journey with the author through her apprenticeship in a pottery studio in Miyama. We feel her toil, smart with her as she suffers her mistakes and failures, and delight at her forays into "regular" life with her host family and the locals (as when she eats her daily meals and helps a villager plant and harvest her rice crop).The thread through this book is her work in the pottery studio, and the reason I only gave it three stars is because I don't think that people who are not into clay and Japan like I am will be as interested in the book.

  • Dee
    2018-11-19 16:18

    A very well-written account of the author's time living in a small potter's village in Japan. I fell in love with the village of Miyama while reading this book- the simple life, the varied characters who live there, the natural beauty. As much as I love art and pottery I honestly don't know the terminology so I felt lost at points when the author goes into details, it was a little too much for me. Someone who knows more about pottery though would definitely love this book!

  • John
    2018-11-29 18:15

    Quite a well-written memoir! Pottery aspect of the story became a bit detailed at times, slowing down the overall story a bit, but that's a minor quibble. Author does a terrific job in showing details of small town Japanese society; although events took place a generation ago, the book didn't feel particularly dated at all.Highly recommended

  • Duncan Mchale
    2018-11-26 15:57

    Lovely account of a young American woman in the 1980s spending two years in Japan as a potter's apprentice. Beautifully written. Intelligent and heartfelt insights into a foreign culture. Masterful and loving description of the work of a potter.

  • Nancy
    2018-12-19 17:10

    Very interesting. Not my favorite look at Japan, but one person's experience in a small town. Fascinating stories if you are interested in ceramics and pottery.

  • Rhode
    2018-12-15 14:02

    If I were deeply interested in the topic, it would have gotten 5 stars. In this case, the fault lies in me, not the author. Perfect gift for the potter in your life.