Read Mrs. Mattingly's Miracle: The Prince, the Widow, and the Cure That Shocked Washington City by Nancy Lusignan Schultz Online

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In 1824 in Washington, D.C., Ann Mattingly, widowed sister of the city's mayor, was miraculously cured of a ravaging cancer. Just days, or perhaps even hours, from her predicted demise, she arose from her sickbed free from agonizing pain and able to enjoy an additional thirty-one years of life. The Mattingly miracle purportedly came through the intervention of a charismatiIn 1824 in Washington, D.C., Ann Mattingly, widowed sister of the city's mayor, was miraculously cured of a ravaging cancer. Just days, or perhaps even hours, from her predicted demise, she arose from her sickbed free from agonizing pain and able to enjoy an additional thirty-one years of life. The Mattingly miracle purportedly came through the intervention of a charismatic German cleric, Prince Alexander Hohenlohe, who was credited already with hundreds of cures across Europe and Great Britain. Though nearly forgotten today, Mattingly's astonishing healing became a polarizing event. It heralded a rising tide of anti-Catholicism in the United States that would culminate in violence over the next two decades. Nancy L. Schultz deftly weaves analysis of this episode in American social and religious history together with the astonishing personal stories of both Ann Mattingly and the healer Prince Hohenlohe, around whom a cult was arising in Europe. Schultz's riveting book brings to light an early episode in the ongoing battle between faith and reason in the United States....

Title : Mrs. Mattingly's Miracle: The Prince, the Widow, and the Cure That Shocked Washington City
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ISBN : 11873075
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 287 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Mrs. Mattingly's Miracle: The Prince, the Widow, and the Cure That Shocked Washington City Reviews

  • Nancy
    2019-05-15 22:12

    One day in 1824, Mrs. Ann Mattingly was miraculously cured of terminal breast cancer just hours before her expected demise. The cure was arranged through the efforts of the Catholic Community through a German faith healer and cleric, Prince Hohenlohe. Mrs. Mattingly was a widow and the sister of Washington's mayor, Thomas Carberry. Within days, the word of her healing spread up and down the East Coast. Thousand of people flocked to Mr. Carberry's home to see Mrs. Mattingly. The mostly Jesuit leaders of Washington's Catholic religious community at what is today Georgetown University became concerned that this act of healing would be presented to the public in a sensational manner which would bring negative publicity and Anti - Catholic sentiment. The story of Mrs. Mattingly, her family and times are fascinatingly told by Ms. Schultz. Ms. Schultz also tells the story of the Washington Catholic Community from its founding at St. Mary's City in the Seventeenth Century to the early Nineteen Century.

  • Lindsey
    2019-05-08 02:37

    This book was badly in need of an editor. It jumped around, telling stories that had nothing to do with the topic at hand, other than a tangential relation to a distant relative of someone who might have been in the story. It neglected to really focus on the cure or on the times surrounding the cure, looking instead at a number of other minor miracles around the world and at the family drama that happened over several generations through the Mattingly family. The author seemed to confuse coincidence and correlation, and in general was not a very good philosophical thinker despite attempting to be one. Her strongest moments were when she was exploring the places of gender and race in 19th century American society and how they interacted with the role of the Catholic church. In all, I have to say, I'm glad it was short.

  • Courtney
    2019-05-24 21:38

    Gives an intimate look at Catholicism in the early American republic, through the prism of one woman's miraculous recovery from terminal breast cancer. Especially interesting given that many of the historical currents surrounding the event are still part of the ebb and flow of modern politics. The factionalism within the American Church, as well as the precursors to the anti-Catholic Know-Nothing party all have their echoes in such current events as the debate over the HHS birth control mandate.Overall, a very worthwhile read.

  • The Book : An Online Review at The New Republic
    2019-05-22 22:39

    IN THE EARLY HOURS of March 10, 1824, Ann Mattingly, the sister of the mayor of Washington, D.C., lay on her sick bed, consumed with cancer. Her back was ulcerated. She had an incessant cough that sometimes gave way to fits so violent that they were “followed by puking large quantities of corrupted blood.”Read more...

  • Ben
    2019-05-23 01:15

    I agree with a previous reviewer that this book could have benefited greatly from additional editing. It's a fascinating story and the beginning starts strong, but it suffered from digression and a lack of focus.

  • Michael Kearney
    2019-05-21 22:21

    very engaging and the use the fiction element in each chapter was done very well. I could see Nancy doing other books about religion in the federalist period.

  • Ellen Hynes
    2019-05-22 03:41

    Good. The author is quite knowledgeable about Catholicism. I now want to read her book Fire and Roses.