Read The Two Lolitas by Michael Maar Perry Anderson Online

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A leading German scholar reveals the secret history of Nabokov's infamous novel. Does it ring a bell? The first-person narrator, a cultivated man of middle age, looks back on the story of an amour fou. It all starts when, traveling abroad, he takes a room as a lodger. The moment he sees the daughter of the house, he is lost. She is a pre-teen, whose charms instantly enslaA leading German scholar reveals the secret history of Nabokov's infamous novel.Does it ring a bell? The first-person narrator, a cultivated man of middle age, looks back on the story of an amour fou. It all starts when, traveling abroad, he takes a room as a lodger. The moment he sees the daughter of the house, he is lost. She is a pre-teen, whose charms instantly enslave him. Heedless of her age, he becomes intimate with her. In the end she dies, and the narratormarked by her foreverremains alone. The name of the girl supplies the title of the story: Lolita. We know the girl and her story, and we know the title. But the author was Heinz von Eschwege, whose tale of Lolita appeared in 1916 under the pseudonym Heinz von Lichberg, forty years before Nabokov's celebrated novel took the world by storm. Von Lichberg later became a prominent journalist in the Nazi era, and his youthful work faded from view. The Two Lolitas uncovers a remarkable series of parallels between the two works and their authors. Did Vladimir Nabokov, author of an imperishable Lolita who remained in Berlin until 1937, know of von Lichberg's tale? And if so, did he adopt it consciously, or was this a classic case of "cryptoamnesia," with the earlier tale existing for Nabokov as a hidden, unacknowledged memory? In this extraordinary literary detective story, Michael Maar casts new light on the making of one of the most influential works of the twentieth century....

Title : The Two Lolitas
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781844670383
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 112 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Two Lolitas Reviews

  • Ammar
    2019-04-02 07:31

    its an okay booki expected better

  • Dorian
    2019-03-31 12:38

    Maar has done some useful and suggestive literary detective work, in bringing to light a series of uncanny parallels between Nabokov's Lolita and a short story featuring a nymphet heroine of the same name by a now-obscure German writer of the teens, twenties and thirties.The problem here, beyond the endless series of conjectures, often formulated rhetorically (isn't iot likely that Nabokov, living in Berlin in those years, could have come across the story, etc), and Perry Anderson's indifferent translation (feels like he spent about an hour on it), is that Maar spends exactly one page (the last one) asking the key questions: if it's true that Nabokov did know the earlier text, what does it matter? In other words, what are the stakes of this investigation? What has Maar proved? Most importantly: how does it change the way we read the Lolita we think we know and love?Lots of windup, little follow-through.

  • Scotty
    2019-04-10 13:41

    it was a slow day at work, so i read it. fantastic analysis. however, his french-isms were really annoying. in most cases, the english word would have been a superior choice. the book's a translation, right? translate.

  • Damian Mxyzptlk
    2019-03-30 09:31

    Quite interesting literary speculative investigation that uncovers something about the way Nabokov worked - taking details from an abominable short story and including them in his own novels and plays - only to mock the terrible writing of a virtually unknown German author, apparently. It's a good read, sometimes mind blowing, and as a bonus includes the two short stories that must have, in some way, inspired Nabokov: an "ur-Lolita", and another one that shares a lot with The Invention of Waltz. The discovery doesn't change much about my perception of Nabokov's genius, and perhaps I even admire it more now, having found how he played with stories that would otherwise be all but forgotten (as they were until discovered and investigated in relation to Nabokov).

  • Lauren Strickland
    2019-04-20 12:45

    Short and sweet, just how I like my literary biographies. Too much in the traditional essay structure to be a truly compelling read, but interesting enough subject to keep the reader engaged. Would have been improved if the author had been able to take a more definitive position - did Nabokov plagiarize? Didn't he? - but I guess this stance is one of the downsides of being predominantly a fiction reader - you expect too much in the way of conclusions.

  • Donald
    2019-03-26 10:30

    Really interesting short book which traces the possibility that either consciouslyor subconsciously, Nabokov fashioned some incidents of his Masterpiece from a minorGerman writer short stories, who lived in Berlin at the same time he did. There is nothing more thansurmise to back this up, but interesting, non the less. If you are one who reads everything on Nabokov, this might be a satisfying read.

  • Kris McCracken
    2019-03-29 13:32

    A (vaguely) interesting bit of literary detective work. I’ll be frank, I found it a somewhat dull. Your time would be better spent reading Nabokov himself, or even the ‘lost’ work of Heinz von Lichberg (the author of the ‘other’, less famous Lolita). Only for the completists.

  • Mark Carter
    2019-04-06 08:53

    Interesting, but the whole thing could have been done with a bullet point list. He was wordy and dry in order to make this into a book, and it still came out to a small book. Looks like he just wanted to charge $20 for something that could have been a magazine article.

  • Lucas
    2019-04-04 11:59

    Intriguing.