Read Microchip: An Idea, Its Genesis, And The Revolution It Created by Jeffrey Zygmont Online

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Computer chips are an almost invisible part of our modern lives, and yet they make much of what's "modern" in them possible. Even the tech-averse and the tech-opposed among us depend on their hidden capabilities. From today's automobiles, medical scanners, and DVD players to annoying musical greeting cards, space travel, and movies like The Lord of the Rings, microelectronComputer chips are an almost invisible part of our modern lives, and yet they make much of what's "modern" in them possible. Even the tech-averse and the tech-opposed among us depend on their hidden capabilities. From today's automobiles, medical scanners, and DVD players to annoying musical greeting cards, space travel, and movies like The Lord of the Rings, microelectronics are everywhere-and taken for granted. But how did this revolutionary technology emerge? Microchip tells that story by exploring the personalities behind the technology. From the two pioneering men who invented the integrated circuit, Nobel Prize winner Jack Kilby and Intel founder Robert Noyce, to luminaries like Gordon Moore and An Wang who put the chip to work, Jeffrey Zygmont shows how the history of the microchip is also the story of a handful of visionaries confronting problems and facing opportunities. A compelling narrative about the germination and advancement of a single technology, Microchip is essential reading about the now-ubiquitous integrated circuit and its outlook for the future....

Title : Microchip: An Idea, Its Genesis, And The Revolution It Created
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780738205618
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Microchip: An Idea, Its Genesis, And The Revolution It Created Reviews

  • Andres Lucero
    2019-05-28 09:38

    The trials and tribulations of semiconductor pioneers was an interesting subject, and one that I found fascinating despite the author's shortcomings as a storyteller. Zygmont is probably a fine journalist, but when attempting to describe the feelings and insights of the men who brought integrated circuits into the world, he flounders with overzealous embellishments and nonsensical terminology. Worth the read for the historical context it provides to our "modern" society.

  • Lucy
    2019-06-25 07:51

    The title is a little misleading. Sure, this book is about the history of microchips, but it goes well beyond just the chips themselves, to show some of their key uses. These forays provide the most interesting parts of the book: the early days of microwave ovens, cell phones, word processors, even the electronics used in cars. My biggest complaint is that this book was published in 2003. I'd love to see what the author would add if he revisited his book today.

  • Ricky
    2019-06-14 07:43

    As a software developer in training, I was looking forward to learning more about the hardware that makes my work possible. As a graduate of Grinnell College, I was looking forward to learning more about esteemed alumn Noyce. I got neither of those things from this book. The author does a terrible job explaining the technical aspects, and relies exclusively on obnoxious, flowery language to play up the social aspects.