Read Last Drinks: The Impact of the Nothern Territory Intervention by Paul Toohey Online

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When Mal Brough and John Howard announced the Northern Territory intervention in mid-2007, they proclaimed a child abuse emergency. In this riveting piece of reportage and analysis, Paul Toohey unpicks the rhetoric of emergency and tracks progress. One year on, have children been saved? Will Labor continue with the intervention? What are the reasons for the social crisis -When Mal Brough and John Howard announced the Northern Territory intervention in mid-2007, they proclaimed a child abuse emergency. In this riveting piece of reportage and analysis, Paul Toohey unpicks the rhetoric of emergency and tracks progress. One year on, have children been saved? Will Labor continue with the intervention? What are the reasons for the social crisis - the neglect and the violence - and how might things be different? Toohey argues that the real issue is not sexual abuse, but rather a more general neglect of children. He criticises the way both white courts and black law have viewed violent crime by Aboriginal men. He examines the permit system and the quarantining of welfare money and argues that due to Labor's changes to these, the intervention is now effectively over - though the crisis persists. In Last Drinks, Paul Toohey offers the definitive account of how the Territory intervention came about and what it has achieved....

Title : Last Drinks: The Impact of the Nothern Territory Intervention
Author :
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ISBN : 9781863952156
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 141 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Last Drinks: The Impact of the Nothern Territory Intervention Reviews

  • ivana
    2019-06-07 13:27

    The Northern Territory Intervention was widely criticised by us city folks to be a disaster; absolute shambles.And in a lot of ways, it was. There is not a fuck of a lot that legislation is going to do in repairing entire livelihoods, communities, generations or diasporas. Nor is silly, unthought-out policies about how much alcohol one can buy (less than $100 unless you want to be put on a register) or what land is going where.However, there were a few good things that came out of it: once they (the bureaucrats - in the form of the Howard and Rudd governments) pulled the 'child sexual abuse' wig off their heads, and actually started trying to fix things up, a few things did go right: children had their first medical examinations since they were born; food started being bought; people started feeling useful. The excellent part about this edition of the Quarterly Essay is the hindsight that Toohey can exercise: a cumulative, how-far-have-we-come sort of perspective. It's also written in a wonderful style, although with a bit too much anecdotal evidence for my taste. He also seems to meander all over the place, failing to sustain one idea or one argument, arguing in some cases that Mal Brough (the federal Indigenous Affairs minister at the time, succeeded by Jenny Macklin in the Rudd government) was doing the right thing, at other times he wasn't. I'm looking forward to following up on this edition with the correspondence from the next - the Quarterly Essay is rather like getting two goes in the lucky dip in that respect.

  • Jake
    2019-06-12 10:42

    This book challenged me in a pretty profound way. I've always been uncomfortable with paternalism and the notion of taking away the autonomy of aboriginal people as happened during the intervention. After reading this book, I'm pretty keen to find out more for myself and sample a wider range of views.