Read All This Hell: U.S. Nurses Imprisoned by the Japanese by Evelyn M. Monahan Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee Online

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More than one hundred U.S. Army and Navy nurses were stationed in Guam and the Philippines at the beginning of World War II. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, five navy nurses on Guam became the first American military women of World War II to be taken prisoner by the Japanese. More than seventy army nurses survived five months of combat conditionMore than one hundred U.S. Army and Navy nurses were stationed in Guam and the Philippines at the beginning of World War II. After the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, five navy nurses on Guam became the first American military women of World War II to be taken prisoner by the Japanese. More than seventy army nurses survived five months of combat conditions in the jungles of Bataan and Corregidor before being captured, only to endure more than three years in prison camps. In all, nearly one hundred nurses became POWs. Many of these army nurses were considered too vital to the war effort to be evacuated from the Philippines. Though receiving only half the salary of male officers of the same rank, they helped establish outdoor hospitals and treated thousands of casualties despite rapidly decreasing supplies and rations. After their capture, they continued to care for the sick and wounded throughout their internment in the prison camps. This account of the nurses' imprisonment adds a vital chapter to the history of American personnel in the Pacific theater. Lt. Col. Madeline Ullom, one of the captured nurses, remarked, "Even though women were not supposed to be on the front lines, on the front lines we were. Women were not supposed to be interned either, but it happened to us. People should know what we endured. People should know what we can endure." When freedom came, the U.S. military ordered the nurses to sign agreements with the government not to discuss their horrific experiences. Evelyn Monahan and Rosemary Neidel-Greenlee have conducted numerous interviews with survivors and scoured archives for letters, diaries, and journals to uncover the heroism and sacrifices of these brave women. The authors' dedication to accuracy, combined with their personal expertise in medical care and military culture and discipline, has enabled them to produce a realistic reconstruction of the dramatic experiences of these POWs....

Title : All This Hell: U.S. Nurses Imprisoned by the Japanese
Author :
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ISBN : 9780813121482
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 264 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

All This Hell: U.S. Nurses Imprisoned by the Japanese Reviews

  • April
    2019-01-09 09:51

    I found this book very well organized. It covers the same information as 'We Band of Angels,' so it was nice to get a different perspective on the same information. This book explained where all the hospitals were located and how many nurses were staffed at each one. This book had a better background to what was happening before the bombing in the Philippines.

  • Michael
    2019-01-18 10:05

    A bit of history that is little known brought to light. Well worth reading.

  • Kathy
    2018-12-29 12:46

    The Japanese were incredibly cruel. The nurses were incredible. Caring for others while starving to death and afflicted with dysentery, cholera, malaria and many other hardships. Their reward? They were told not to talk about their experiences and that it was time for them to resume being ladies.

  • Sarah
    2019-01-08 06:46

    This book was incredibly informative. I could not put it down. It painted the picture well of what these nurses had to endure while both on the frontline in Corregidor in the Malinta Tunnel during hours of shelling, the lack of supplies, the mountain of wounded, and ill patients and of course the 3.5 years these women were kept as POWs in Santo Tomas as well as the other camps around the Philippines. There's is a story of true courage and heroism.

  • Amy Keene
    2018-12-30 10:45

    It's not surprising to know that women in military nursing careers went through such atrocities. What is both enlightening and disappointing is that they went largely unrecognized within our history books and within their profession and military branches. I'm honored to know what they did for our military, their colleagues, their enemies and our country. They are truly heroes.

  • Theresa
    2018-12-24 05:38

    Until this book, I hadn't thought about army nurses. There was the Margaret Houlihan character in M*A*S*H*, of course. These nurses survived combat conditions in the jungle (outdoor hospital), and 3 year imprisonment by the Japanese in Guam and the Philipines. At one point, in the context of psychiatric casualties, the authors offer an explanation of why, even under such duress, none of the nurses became psychiatric casualties. Interesting.After their service, they were told to sign agreements that they would not discuss their experiences with anyone. I wonder why, and whether men were also told to sign such agreements. At home after the war, some of the women exhibited symptoms of what we now call PTSD, like hiding food, though there was plenty; nightmares.Although not its purpose, this book gives some background for the current discussion about the role of today's women in the military.

  • Fergie
    2019-01-19 10:59

    ALL THIS HELL: U.S. NURSES IMPRISONED BY THE JAPANESE is a book worthy of being read, if only for the fact that those women who courageously faced the harrowing horrors of war only to find them captives by the heartless forces of the Imperial Army of the Empire of Japan deserve to have their bravery, endurance, and sacrifice remembered. This was a decent read, but one that was even better in scope was BEDPAN COMMANDO; a memoir about the experiences of a U.S. Army Nurse in the European theatre during WWII. With that said, I'm glad I read Evelyn M. Monahan's book. She deserves credit for shedding light on a part of our history that, for too long, has been neglected.

  • Nancy
    2019-01-13 08:42

    Excellent report of the hardships encountered by the Nurses imprisoned by the Japanese during WWII. Everyone knows about the soldiers, sailors and airmen who were POWs during WWII but few know about the nurses and other medical personnel who are women and what they experioenced while imprisoned by the Japanese. A very thought provoking book especially as many of these 'heroines' have passed away.

  • Pat Carson
    2019-01-21 07:51

    The role of nurses in World War II isn't widely known by most of us. The authors take us into the world of American women who served during the fighting at the beginning of the war. These people were imprisoned in Manila until 1945. Riveting read.

  • Mary Farrell
    2019-01-03 04:57

    A gripping true story of courage and resilience.