Read The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott Online

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SUMMARY: A thieving duo’s world turns upside down when an Elven rogue uncovers the heinous dealings of a megacorporation.* * *SYNOPSIS: Anya and Leticia are partners-in-crime who steal for a living. Their world turns upside down after a chance encounter with fellow rogue, Ithilnin—the enigmatic leader of an Elven band of thieves.A scuffle to prove who’s “the better thief”SUMMARY: A thieving duo’s world turns upside down when an Elven rogue uncovers the heinous dealings of a megacorporation.* * *SYNOPSIS: Anya and Leticia are partners-in-crime who steal for a living. Their world turns upside down after a chance encounter with fellow rogue, Ithilnin—the enigmatic leader of an Elven band of thieves.A scuffle to prove who’s “the better thief” transforms into more than Anya and Ithilnin ever bargained for. They retrieve the missing piece of an ancient poem, before getting caught in the secret dealings of a megacorporation. What they uncover threatens to alter the very essence of not just human life, but the other side as well.Elven intrigue, cyberpunk action, and a deadly dose of danger come together in The Other Side of Life [Book #1 in the (Cyberpunk) Elven Trilogy].GENRE: Urban Fantasy / Cyberpunk / YA with adult crossover appeal* Recommended for adults or young adults seeking cyberpunk themes (not hardcore sci-fi), and a love story (not fluffy romance).* This novel features a third-person omniscient point of view (inspired by the POV of Leo Tolstoy's novel, Anna Karenina).===* {Book #2 in the series--The Darker Side of Life--and Book #3 in the series--The Arcane Side of Life--will be available in early 2012. Laer (the dark elf in Book#2) makes an appearance in Skins--a free eBook short story now available on Jess's website!}===EXCERPT #1:Nin knew how much humans loved money, riches, and material things — though he never really could understand why. The more technologically advanced the human species got, the more isolated they seemed to become, at the same time. It was alarming, how humans could spend entire lifetimes engaged in all kinds of activities, without getting any closer to knowing who they really were, inside.EXCERPT #2:"That's sad. How plastic and artificial life has become. It gets harder and harder to find something...real." Nin interlocked his fingers and stretched out his arms. "Real love, real friends, real body parts..."=====For more info/excerpts, please visit: http://www.jessINK.com/tosol.htm=====...

Title : The Other Side of Life
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781456529048
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 234 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Other Side of Life Reviews

  • Matt Posner
    2018-09-24 14:08

    Disclosure: I received a review copy of this book from the author prior to its release and posted an amazon review at that time.Jess C. Scott is a smart, detail-oriented writer with a great grasp of cyberpunk style. She has created a distinct world here, with a unique vision of elves and a wry look at the future of corporations, and both Nin and Anya are rounded, complex characters whose developing relationship makes sense. You root for them to overcome their threats and come out on top. I won't tell you what happens, but this is book one, and I'll be quick to get hold of book 2 when the time comes.Great hand-drawn cover by Jess, too!

  • Sandra
    2018-10-02 07:59

    1. LINK FOR PDF: http://jesscscott.files.wordpress.com...2. LINK FOR KINDLE, SONY, NOOK, KOBO OR OTHER: http://www.smashwords.com/books/view/... [to download the book for free, use coupon code: NM42U (valid until 20 March 2011)]

  • Maverynthia
    2018-10-04 10:50

    Diversity: Dresan is black? Brown skinned at least. Author might just think him as "really tan" (view spoiler)[lives (hide spoiler)]There are two female characters that talk to each other and it doesn't involve a man. Tavia is a third character. While there a tiny amount of girl hate, overall their interactions are positive.Reading the back of the book, the author talks a lot about the way technology impacts people and that's not really shown in the book much at all. It's hard for me to really see the cyberpunk in the book past some electronic fancy watches and such. Everything seems contemporary but different.So this book does have that slant of Technology = Bad; Nature = Good as the whole plot is to stop an evil corporation and save a magic life tree.Which I really hate the whole "technology = bad" some disabled people rely on technology to help them in their lives to live. A pacemaker for example is technology. So of course when we have elves involved they are the "bring nature back" and stuff. it's not really different here.As for the characters, I really didn't get a whole lot of character building about Nin and Tavia and Dresan seemed to be tacked on. Tavia to get kidnapped so they have a reason to go to the 'big bad's' place and Desan to do all the computer stuff while Nin and Anya go off and do their thing. Leticia mostly just seems to be there as a plot gear to keep the story grinding forward.Oh does this story have pacing issues. It seems that nothing really happens for a good portion of the book and it's mostly taken up with Anya and Nin bonding, however I never really feel that they are drawing closer. It's mostly the whole "Love at first sight/ soulmate" thing going on. We really don't learn that much about the elves or really much back story on Anya. Nin of course has to remain mostly a mystery. It just kind of feels, empty.So that takes up a good chunk of the book and then the whole climax happens at the end. While it doesn't feel rushed at the end, it certainly feels "Enough Nin and Anya OK. now I have to have the conflict|climax|resolution" all at once.Overall this book wasn't cyberpunk enough for me. However it does have a slight feeling of Shadowrun with the magic and elves thing going on. So somebody else might be into that. It wasn't a bad read though. At no point did I want to throw the book across the room. I did roll my eyes a couple times. There was that enjoyment. I'll probably pick up the second book if/when it comes out just to see what happens next, however it's not going to be a super high priority.TL:DR: Doesn't feel much like a cyberpunk book, but it might be good to kill some time or get a slight Shadowrun buzz.

  • Lindsay
    2018-10-01 11:54

    3.5/5So, who here is a perfect snob about not reviewing self-published authors? (**blushes**waves hand**). Yeah, that's me. And guess what? Jess C. Scott's The Other Side of Life schooled me right into the bad kids' corner.Scott isn't just a decent writer; she's good, as in G-O-O-D. This Other Side of Life isn't just interesting; it's enterprising. You'd think so many different elements - sci-fi, classic fantasy, romance and something of n hero quest (with a twist) - could become jumbled and be too much at once. There's even a hint of a dystopian setting here. Somehow, Scott makes all the distinctions flow together. I didn't have to try to make the mixing work together - the writing makes it seem perfectly natural and the story flows. That's saying a lot when reading about a tall, hot elf walking around in 2035 with a Bond-worthy, high-tech doofatchee on his wrist:Nin looked up and around the abandoned stone church, in quiet solace and admiration.There was something distinctly unique about the building - it felt safe.He waved a hand in front of the hidden camera situated in a crack in the stone wall, watching the small screen on his N-Gage wrist device. The screen showed the scene at the church - empty - with no sign of him, or his moving hand. Debug: successful, he noted.An old battered wooden cross hung on the wall, and there were a few pews strewn about the interior. The air was cold. The silence, overpowering.-The Other Side of Life, page 1Scott has a great way of weaving unfamiliar elements through familiar settings, and I think is one of the reasons why everything works well together. I think for fans of urban fantasy, this particularly works well.Then there are the characters themselves. I've introduced you to Nin: he's the leader of his crew which consists of his cousin and good friend. However, as he is self-renounced elven prince, you might think that's a demotion. You'd be wrong. It's a deliberate choice of his to eschew a privileged lifestyle an opt for a much less boring one filled with authenticity and purpose. Together, the elves are working on retrieving an important elven artifact which they hope will solve a major problem that both elf-kind and humankind face (although humans don't know it). To help them, they develop their own technology that helps them find this artifact and to keep their presence in the human world as secret as possible. Hence, the 'cyperpunk' descriptive - they've turned their back on traditional elven wisdom and live in harmony with nature and technology, but not slave to it, as humans seem to be.Enter Anya and Leticia., the thieving (human) duo. A chance encounter introduces the duo to the elven trio (during a robbery, no less). Anya and Leticia are both 18 year-old college students, but don't come from backgrounds that can afford the expense of education. Hence, they are thieves for hire (can I tell you how much I love that girls are the sneaky 'bad' guys here? Love it when the ladies tease the law on their own intitiative. . . teehee). Despite initial misgivings, the elves hire them to help retrieve the artifact. The elves are stunned at their decision. Traditional elven wisdom states that humans are dangerous and to be avoided. A lovely attraction develops between Nin and Anya. . . the romance mostly feels natural at times and is a sweet and understated part of the book, but occasionally borders on corny. However, Nin and Anya seem to know this themselves and do some self-chastising when it happens.Those are the bare bones of the story, but I have t tell you, this isn't merely an exciting let's-find-it sci-fi/fantasy adventure (although it's that, too). This is a thoughtful, well-done narrative that incorporates discussion on social distinctions and consequences, environmental irresponsibility, and discussion on how we as a society live our lives. Just when you fear the narrative is going to shift from relevant commentary into pulpit rant, it pulls back and refocuses on the excitement and romance. That's something I really want to praise Scott for: no one element of the story ever overwhelms the other - there was a very nice balance that made everything flow in and out of each part.Is this book perfect? Nope. There are a few issues here and there. I did notice that Scott is comma happy, and they aren't always needed. There are also some redundant adjectives and descriptions - these are little, nitpicky things that I noted here and there (former journalist - my inner editor comes sneaking out). Nin is in danger of getting too gushy with his elven love poetry at times, but then it's funny because he mocks himself for it. However, it is a testament to how interesting I found the story that theses things did not truly bother me. I adored the first half the book, and enjoyed the second half. I occasionally would get confused during the 'covert ops' scenes, and by that I mean I wasn't always sure if I was picturing what was going on correctly. That being said, I stand in admiration of Scott - she has accomplished a great story as a one-man band. When you think that an author with a major house has both an agent, editor, as well as a marketing and design team for guidance, I think it says a lot for Scott that she's put together a solid story with good characters and interesting plot by herself and on her own terms. I adored the ending. You might be crushed, but I appreciate that Scott stuck by the sad consequences of a selfless choice instead of conjuring up a last minute miracle. Nope, not telling you what happened, but it definitely has me looking forward to book two.I found the title intriguing, and I really loved how well it tied into so many different aspects of the story. The Other Side of Life relates to everything from having a worldview different from the one you are raised with, to knowing what it's like walking in someone else's shoes, to knowing what literally happens when our consciousness passes from this one existence to another. This book is an entertaining, enlightening and engaging read. In particular, if you liked The Unidentified by Rae Mariz, Inside Out by Maria V. Snyder and are anticipating Memento Nora by Angie Smibert, I think you'll enjoy this one, too. I know I did.In your waderings and dealings, neglect not - the Other Side of Life.-2nd Poem, pg. 41, The Other Side of Life

  • Jonathan
    2018-09-25 12:51

    I'm a sucker for cyberpunk. Let's put that out there right off the bat. Honesty's the best policy, right? See, I cut my teeth on Shadowrun novels when I was growing up, and I've always had a soft spot for the genre because of it. Shadowrun is a glorious mishmash of everything good in the world: sci-fi, corporate dystopia, computers, cybernetics, and a big heaping dose of everything fantasy. I love it. I could eat it every meal for a week straight and still love every bite. So when I heard about the new cyberpunk novel The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott of course I jumped at the chance to read it. I also jumped at the chance to interview its author, but for that you'll have to look over here somewhere. For now we're talking books and my opinion of them. We'll get to Jess later, I promise.Ahem. Now then...Much like the aforementioned darling of my misspent youth, The Other Side of Life includes a healthy dose of urban fantasy along with its cyberpunk trappings. Scott imagines a world dominated the corporate machine, a world beholden to the newest gadget or the latest cosmetic surgery or the coolest car. In other words, a world not all that different from ours. But in this word there is an opposing force, a race of elves that skulks the shadows on the fringes of the human world, hiding their true identities in order to subtlety guide events and protect their way of life. At one time the Elves and Humans lived in peace together, but long ago humankind chose to forsake magic and earthen power in favor of machines and science. Now most of mankind do not believe the Elves ever existed in the first place, and elvenkind live sequestered within their invisible palaces, content but to watch as their distant cousins drown under the weight of their own iniquity. That is, of course, except for a talented band of techno-brigands charged with reclaiming lost Elven artifacts, which is where our story starts off.Nin, the unspoken leader of the Elven trio, approaches a pair of ladies for aid in stealing a shred of parchment which holds the missing piece of an ancient Elven poem. The girls are Anya and Leticia, university students whose financial aid package includes stealing various and sundry valuables and selling them to the highest bidder. Nin eventually reveals his true identity and that of his companions to the girls as well as the history of the Elves. In the process he begins to develop feelings for Anya, which she reciprocates in the usual teenage fashion with lots of blushing and stuttering and daydreaming about his stupefyingly good looks. Thus ensues the typical fumbling and feeling around that happens with any budding young romance; however, before things can really get going, complications arise during their break-in attempt, sending their new-found attraction to the back burner. It is discovered that the pharmaceutical corporation Xenith has been harvesting the root of the tree Bloodstar, a tree in the Amazon Basin that is literally the Tree of Life, the root of all life on earth. The root has heretofore been used as ingredients in anti-aging products, but the corporation has plans to use an ancient Elven ritual (contained in the poem I mentioned earlier) to destroy the tree and distill from it the means of obtaining eternal life. And then off our motley band goes to foil the evil corporation and save mother earth. That's The Other Side of Life in a nutshell. Sounds pretty cool, right? Well it is. In addition to the thievery adventure and inter-species romance, though, Scott explores a variety of themes--some you typically find in cyberpunk, and some you don't. Of course there's the commercialism aspect, which she neatly weaves into the government intrusion into private life. And computer technology features heavily into the setting, too. For the most part all that is par for the cyberpunk course. What isn't exactly par, however, are the environmental themes Scott incorporates into the story. The combination of cyberpunk and urban fantasy allows her to craft a more poignant message when it comes to the exploitation of the earth by corporate greed. When examined with an allegorical lens, The Other Side of Life is quite literally a story about the destruction of the earth in the name of higher profit margins. Certainly it's an exaggeration of the current state of affairs, but it also serves as a warning of the possible outcomes if we cannot balance the interests of business and progress against the ecological health of the planet as a whole. Pretty cool stuff.What didn't I like about the book? Well, there were a couple of things. Not anything major, mind you, but some things both technical and stylistic that could be improved upon. For one, there were a lot of unnecessary of commas. I mean really. A lot. Those things procreate like rabbits in heat. But while my inner-English teacher cringes every time it sees an unneeded comma, it's really not that big of a deal and it won't utterly ruin the reading experience (unless you're an even stricter grammarian than me, which is unlikely). A slightly bigger deal, though still not at all an earth-shattering flaw, is the handling of perspective, especially earlier on in the book. Many times the perspective will switch from character to character inside of one scene. It's almost like a game of POV hot potato, with no one character hanging onto it for very long before flinging it over to another—and almost never with a proper scene break. Generally it goes back and forth between just between Anya and Nin, but even that was bothersome for me. Then again I'm something of a purist when it comes to point of view, so other folks out there may not find it as troubling as I did.And that's my take on The Other Side of Life. There were some more esoteric aspects that tweaked me ever-so-slightly, but by and large I really did enjoy its cyberpunk deliciousity. I give it three stars. http://readabookonce.blogspot.com/201...

  • Maria Violante
    2018-10-20 12:11

    If I had to pick a word that summed up my feelings about The Other Side of Life, it would be … ambivalent. Creative and stylish in theory, but lacking in execution, it has been the hardest book to review thus far, and I’ll tell you about why.First of all, the bad.There are a number of mistakes (okay, you can call them creative license, I still call them mistakes) the author has made here that made the book hard for me to read. For starters, the POV is all over the place, jumping from character to character, and then into an omniscient state. We’re never fully in one person’s head for long enough to really understand any of the characters, and in sections where multiple people are together and talking, it can actually be hard to know who said what until you’re three or four lines down the passage. I found myself having to constantly go back and reread things and kind of “force” myself into the narrative, especially in the first 25%. This is the opposite of what you want, i.e., a book well written enough that grammar and technique are playing in the shadows while you fall into the story! Additionally, and more minor, Scott throws in a bunch of extra commas, meaning that I’m pausing mentally when I shouldn’t be.Another thing I had a major issue with was character motivation. While Scott *does* give us insight into why her characters do the things they do, I find the explanation to be thin, hard to believe, and lacking – both for minor actions, like “Why do Anya and Nin initially each other,” all the way to major things, like, “Why is Anya risking her neck to help Nin in the first place?” I would have really liked it if the thought processes that led up to the actions were better explained – either through memories, pieces of backstory, or a more detailed description of feelings.” I also (and this one may just be my fault) didn’t really understand how the rules of this new universe worked, especially in how characters suddenly “knew” incredibly complicated and important pieces of knowledge. Like, how does Julius understand that he can choose between his own welfare and Leticia’s without anybody telling him or giving him a clear sign? Did he sense it from the “tree’s” force? If so, that needed to be better explain. This was a pattern I found repeating itself throughout the course of the novel; I just kept saying – How did they know that?The final complaint that I had with this book is that at times, it felt like a diatribe with a novel pasted on top of it. I understand that cyberpunk is all about being against commercialism, the machine, and the danger of misusing technology, but there were entire, oddly timed passages, that espoused these viewpoints without really weaving them into the story. It was frustrating; while writing with a meaning is important, it should always (in my opinion) fall second to the flow and development of the narrative itself.Oh, and minor point. The Mayans were the first with Cocoa as in “chocolate”, coca leaves as the forerunner to cocaine were actually an Incan/Quechua device.The Good:Wow, that felt mean. Unfortunately, it also felt honest. Luckily, there are also quite a few good things to say about this work that will help pull the punch.For starters, it’s pretty imaginative, and it has many of the elements we all look for with a good story. There’s a plucky heroine, a dreamy hero, a loyal sidekick, and an evil but redeemable villain (revealed only after a nice plot twist!) Nobody is invulnerable and everybody is quite human.There are also passages where the author manages to stay in just one POV for long enough to create some real human meaning; my favorite is where the main character is giving her mom an, um, package at the mother’s place of employment. The mother’s concern and unspoken thoughts were both real and touching, and it was a definite point of light in the work.And the author should be applauded for weaving her beliefs and a deeper message into her work, even if the execution isn’t always perfect. She’s definitely attempted something that we don’t see everyday, both stylistically and in her intended message, and she gets full points for bravery in that regard.Finally, there is a lot of creativity in both her descriptions of the near future and in some of the things we see in the Elven domains. I was pretty excited at both the presentation of Nin’s homeland and in the unique method of transport that was discussed, although I felt like these things should have been developed an explained further.Final Score: 3.2 stars. An interesting read that misses the mark of greatness, but an excellent start for this author. I look forward to see how she might handle these issues in the future.Reviewed for mariaviolante.com

  • Sack Boy
    2018-09-27 11:49

    A reminder again of how the scoring works: Low scores = GOOD. High scores = BAD. Points are earned based on flaws. They're taken away for super awesome moments. Star ratings are done based on number of points in comparison to the number of pages in the book. 0-20% = 1 20-40% = 2 40-60%= 3 60-80% = 4 and 80-100% =5.REVIEW: THE OTHER SIDE OF LIFE - Jess C. ScottSCORE: 10 points.RATING: 5 starsMore often than not when I pick up a self-published novel, I get a little pit in my stomach. Is this going to be good, or am I going to regret my decision. More often than not I lean more towards the latter because while I’m all about the self-publishing industry, a lot of self-published authors need better editors to the point where I’m so distracted by mentally red-penning a book to death, I can’t enjoy the story. Yeah, so a lot of books have the occasional errors in them, but when they’re so plentiful they distract from the work, that’s usually a bad sign.Hesitations aside, I started this book. The concept seemed too cool to pass up, and boy am I glad I did because this book is probably the best indie/self-published novel I’ve picked up in a long, long time, if not to-date. I’m happy to say, I was able to enjoy this story and not be distracted, and boy is the story a good one. I’ll copy and paste the synopsis here so you can see for yourself.Anya and Leticia are partners-in-crime who steal for a living. Their world turns upside down after a chance encounter with fellow rogue, Ithilnin—the enigmatic leader of an Elven band of thieves.A scuffle to prove who’s “the better thief” transforms into more than Anya and Ithilnin ever bargained for. They retrieve the missing piece of an ancient poem, before getting caught in the secret dealings of a megacorporation. What they uncover threatens to alter the very essence of not just human life, but the other side as well.Elven intrigue, cyberpunk action, and a deadly dose of danger come together in The Other Side of Life [Book #1 in the (Cyberpunk) Elven Trilogy].WHAT WORKSThe story starts out quick enough. There’s hardly ever a time where it lags actually. It’s a great pace of information and action. What I especially like is that while you might be able to predict the romance line, it doesn’t follow into cliché story line patterns. The chemistry is real and it develops so fluently that I’m rooting for the characters in all of their adventures.In fact, all of the characters in this book are diverse and developed enough where you’re interested in their lives. I find in a lot of books, an author only takes the time to hold the readers interest in just the main characters. That wasn’t the case in this book.If there was something I loved the most about this novel however, it was that Scott was able to create a completely new world for me. With the plethora of cookie cutter fiction out there, this was a breath of fresh air for me. I got to travel to a world of corruption, technological dreams, and magic. She does a wonderful blend of magic and science, keeping it fantasy but believable with lots of good cultural references in the mix. In fact, the world was so believable and well described that when I went to bed that night I had a dream about breaking in to a corporate tower with a group of elves. I’m not lying. You have invaded my dream world Scott, and this is quite a feat to accomplish. ;)WHAT DIDN’T WORK (aka earning the points)Points were earned simply for some minor errors. Five points were given for some grammar blips and writing errors, and then another five were for some formatting problems. They weren’t anything distracting necessarily, but they were noticeable, so I can’t sit and give it a completely perfect score of 0. However, 10 points for a 200+ page novel comes out to being 95% perfection and puts it at a 5 of 5 stars.Now, I charge you, Jess C Scott, with getting the next two books of this trilogy out so I can read them. I’m kind of on the edge of my seat here, and I’m pretty sure anyone else who picks up this book will be too. If you’re a lover of science fiction, fantasy, or just looking for something new and different that’s a fun, fast read? Pick up this book. You won’t regret it.

  • Rae
    2018-10-03 09:55

    Let me preface this by saying: I wanted to like this book. I thought the idea of elves in a cyberpunk setting sounded really intriguing and in general I like heist stories. However, right off the bat there were a few things that raised some red flags.When I was reading about the book online it was repeatedly described as being "indie published." Now to me, this phrase sounded like "small press." I like small press, they come out with some interesting things. So when this book arrived in the mail, I flipped to the copyright page to see who the publisher was. I found out the book was self published, but this wasn't the issue I had. It was this:Note: Jess's cyberpunk elves are Tolkien-esque elves, in terms of stature [they're not the Santa type elves;)]Brackets and emoticon are part of the original text.Now first of all, this is not the place for this kind of note to the reader. Secondly, shouldn't this be apparent from the text in the story itself? This is won't be the last time the author beats the reader with particular stick either. This description is later repeated later in the book."Elven?" Anya's voice sounded wobbly and unsteady."Like the elves in Lord of the Rings?" Leticia quipped."Here we go," Travia remarked. [...] At least Anya and Leticia didn't think of elves as the Santa-type which real elves preferred to refer to as 'pixies'.This is repeated again at least once more in the book and then again in the interview in the back of the book, just in case you didn't get it the other three times. One would think that all the author would have to do is refer to the elves as being "tall" for the reader to get the idea. Anyone with at leas a passing familiarity with the fantasy genre is aware of big elves.This trend of information repetition, and assuming the readers are morons who can't remember anything continues throughout the book. The exposition style is of the As You Know variety, and there is a lot of head hopping, especially in the first few chapters. The book doesn't really reach any kind of flow until chapter seven when the heist starts.Overall the characters felt very wooden. The readers are told the main characters are non-conformist, but they never do anything to show this. There's a lot of harping on how wonderful the elves are because they can make technology run on magic, but the reader is never really given any sense of the setting they all live in. Going "the secret hideout is awesome!" does not count.A villain pops out of nowhere after the heist, stands up on a soapbox and gives a speech meant to show how corporations are evil (the book has to justify being cyberpunk somehow), before popping off to kill the tree that keeps the world alive so he can make awesome anti-aging medicine. The heroes being heroes stop him, but the whole thing felt like the author on a soapbox.Other than having the theme of evil corporations, which is fairly common in cyberpunk, there was very little else linking it to the genre. There wasn't enough of a sense of the setting to be able to tell if the world was a dystopia, most dark and depressing themes were so downplayed that it made the villain's monologue seem just thrown in there.Overall, if you have nothing better to do, it'll pass the time, but I never felt like I couldn't put the book down, nor did I ever feel attached to the characters. I really didn't care about anyone in the book. The story had potential, but it never panned out.

  • Danielle
    2018-10-12 09:48

    In the future life is powered by machines and corporations. It’s not how hard you work, but how much you have and how beautiful you are that makes the world take notice. In an attempt to tip the scales Anya and her best friend Leticia ban together to steal back items and return them to their rightful owners. Of course, with an incentive for themselves, but the life is more rewarding than the alternative. When they’re approached by the impossible, an Elven trio, with the job of a lifetime against a mega-corporation that has ruined many it takes only moments to make the decision to help, but is it the right decision? And in the end who’s heart will be on the line, Anya’s or her new love Nin?So, first things first. I’m not a huge fan of self-publishing. I’ll just get that out there. You may be surprised, because next month I’ll be featuring some self-published titles. A lot of the reason I generally don’t care for them is the lack of editing and overall poor story development. Well, I have to honestly say I was pleasantly surprised by The Other Side of Life. Not only was it extremely well edited, but the plot was more well written than some house published books I’ve read. Truly, this was an incredible fantasy novel and a series I’m hoping Jess C. Scott keeps up with, because she’s obviously extremely talented.Much of the story actually reminded me of a blend of popular dystopian novels set in a futuristic “Blade Runner” style setting, which was incredibly cool. What was different though was the introduction of the fantasy element through Tolkien-style elves. Going into it I honestly had no idea what to expect with the “cyberpunk” genre attached to it, but it made for something I’d never experienced on a whole which was fantastic. It wasn’t as if there were elves romping around constantly or elaborate descriptions like typical fantasy books, but a complete blending of the two with superb editing to make enjoyable for younger readers especially. A fantasy novel with technology, something I’ve never read before, but truly enjoyed.As for the characters, I thoroughly enjoyed every single one of them actually. Nin was probably my favorite, most likely because he was an elf and had a unique way of interacting with Anya in particular. What I liked especially was how Scott explained Anya and Nin’s romance, which developed rather quickly over just a days time. Normally I would have rolled my eyes at such an immediate attraction, but she wrote it in such a way that it seemed natural because of the magic surrounding the elves. In addition, each of the supporting characters, from Tavia to Leticia were also likable and well written.Fantasy readers who love technology will not want to miss The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott. Blending the world of the elves with an almost dystopian type setting in the human world creates a unique story that has rarely been written so well. With characters you quickly connect with and an incredibly fast moving storyline this is a book that readers will devour and be left waiting for the next in the series. Join Anya and Nin on a journey into the impossible and be prepared to be shocked by how stunning this new series truly is.Originally reviewed & copyrighted on my site, There's A Book.

  • Danielle
    2018-09-20 09:05

    In the future life is powered by machines and corporations. It’s not how hard you work, but how much you have and how beautiful you are that makes the world take notice. In an attempt to tip the scales Anya and her best friend Leticia ban together to steal back items and return them to their rightful owners. Of course, with an incentive for themselves, but the life is more rewarding than the alternative. When they’re approached by the impossible, an Elven trio, with the job of a lifetime against a mega-corporation that has ruined many it takes only moments to make the decision to help, but is it the right decision? And in the end who’s heart will be on the line, Anya’s or her new love Nin?So, first things first. I’m not a huge fan of self-publishing. I’ll just get that out there. You may be surprised, because next month I’ll be featuring some self-published titles. A lot of the reason I generally don’t care for them is the lack of editing and overall poor story development. Well, I have to honestly say I was pleasantly surprised by The Other Side of Life. Not only was it extremely well edited, but the plot was more well written than some house published books I’ve read. Truly, this was an incredible fantasy novel and a series I’m hoping Jess C. Scott keeps up with, because she’s obviously extremely talented.Much of the story actually reminded me of a blend of popular dystopian novels set in a futuristic “Blade Runner” style setting, which was incredibly cool. What was different though was the introduction of the fantasy element through Tolkien-style elves. Going into it I honestly had no idea what to expect with the “cyberpunk” genre attached to it, but it made for something I’d never experienced on a whole which was fantastic. It wasn’t as if there were elves romping around constantly or elaborate descriptions like typical fantasy books, but a complete blending of the two with superb editing to make enjoyable for younger readers especially. A fantasy novel with technology, something I’ve never read before, but truly enjoyed.As for the characters, I thoroughly enjoyed every single one of them actually. Nin was probably my favorite, most likely because he was an elf and had a unique way of interacting with Anya in particular. What I liked especially was how Scott explained Anya and Nin’s romance, which developed rather quickly over just a days time. Normally I would have rolled my eyes at such an immediate attraction, but she wrote it in such a way that it seemed natural because of the magic surrounding the elves. In addition, each of the supporting characters, from Tavia to Leticia were also likable and well written.Fantasy readers who love technology will not want to miss The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott. Blending the world of the elves with an almost dystopian type setting in the human world creates a unique story that has rarely been written so well. With characters you quickly connect with and an incredibly fast moving storyline this is a book that readers will devour and be left waiting for the next in the series. Join Anya and Nin on a journey into the impossible and be prepared to be shocked by how stunning this new series truly is.

  • B.K. Walker
    2018-09-30 15:48

    The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott was a pleasant read. A definite change from the normal fantasy novels I've come across.Anya London and her best friend Leticia made a life out of being thieves. When they enter the old Stone Church, they had no idea that someone was lingering about listening to their conversation.Nin had been looking for someone to help him and his crew to find a missing parchment to an Elven poem. When he hears Anya and Leticia talking, he eavesdropped, getting a sense he could entrust these two girls to his mission. Finally approaching them after noticing they hold an old Elven Goblet, he bargains for the enchanted piece to return it to its rightful owner. Promising them another treasure, we meet Tavia and Dresan. Tavia is actually Nin's cousin, though he plays her off as a girlfriend. Things come to a head and both parties faceoff, only to realize these two girls are exactly who they need in order to accomplish retrieving the missing parchment. Taking them to their underground lair, they introduce the girls to their true identities, they are Elves. After the initial shock, Anya feels a connection to Nin, and agrees to help the trio, even after they state that they have already failed and were almost killed.Putting their plan into action, Anya goes home to research Elven history. When Julius, Leticia's boyfriend sees what she is looking into, he swears they never existed. There is something off about Julius though, and we soon find out that he is stealing life from the Elves to fulfill his need for greed.The plot unfolds, the action intensifies, and we are surprised by many of the outcomes that play out. Though this story started off just a smidgen slow, once the action picks up there is no putting this book down until you find out what happens.What I thought could have been a little more drawn out was how easily the girls accepted the fact that this trio were in fact Elves. I thought they took that bit of information a little too lightly, but it didn't really matter once the story picked up.Scott did a great job creating a fantasy world unlike no other, putting her own twist on things making it her own. The end was a huge surprise, and one you would not expect and I'm anxious for the next book in this trilogy. I give The Other Side of Life (4) Latte's.

  • Red Haircrow
    2018-10-19 10:47

    A mix of fantasy and science fiction (using "old" terms), The Other Side of Life is in "new" sub-genres as well: cyperpunk and urban fantasy, both types which are sweeping through fiction like wildfire these days.My editor's eyes definitely had a problem with the point of view switching back and forth between characters from sentence to sentence within a scene, sometimes leaving me not knowing who is experiencing what, and especially who was thinking certain thoughts. I found this unnecessary, because even if you're using two POV's in one scene, the writing and paragraph structures should keep it clean and separate enough. It's possible to do so, but it takes objectivity, removing what is not absolutely necessary at a certain point, and incorporating the information later. Transitions instead of telling is also something which could have been utilized more, itself of being told fact after fact, movement after movement as at times, this came off as rather disjointed to me.I thought the ideas were interesting and novel, although it was a theme explored before, Bioware enhancements and the like. It kept me reading to gain more insight into what it could mean for both human and Elven. I know it's also described as having a romantic element to it, and the author made us aware of the attraction the Nin and Anya felt, but they weren't very compelling to me, especially Anya, as the world overpowered them with its vividness. I felt it was a great idea, yet a little uneven in execution. In the end "The Other Side of Life" would be appealing to a wider audience than just those seeking cyberpunk fantasy. It's a nice read.The full review with author information can be viewed at my review/interview site Flying With Red Haircrow.

  • Snail in Danger (Sid) Nicolaides
    2018-09-30 12:48

    I was looking at George R.R. Martin's Wikipedia entry for some reason and came across something that semi-crystallized my thoughts on this book. Martin apparently thinks that writing fanfiction is bad for aspiring "real" authors, because they won't get practice with worldbuilding (source). Now, this book isn't fanfiction. (Though at least one character is a bit Sue/Stu-ish, complete with violet eyes.) But it did feel like I was reading someone's early attempt at writing, before they had really figured things out. (It has what seem to me to be many usage issues. Lots of problems with commas, among other things. Mid-scene perspective switches. Excessive description. Trying too hard to be cute/clever with words.)I think this author has promise, but also a lot to learn. If the concept didn't sound interesting, I wouldn't have offered to read the book. (I should note here that I was sent a free PDF copy of the book.) It did have a very faint vibe that made me think of Terri Windling's Borderlands setting.I really liked this paragraph: "Humans and elves have a history." Nin was pensive. "They had a falling out several centuries ago — it was a fight between art and science, essentially. By art, what I really mean is imagination, and magic." [emphasis mine]So yeah. If you like fantasy that mixes magic and tech, and you don't mind reading things that are essentially slush, go for it. I know that sounds harsh but ... I'd be lying if I said I thought anything other than that this book needed much more revision before it was ready for the public eye.

  • Jenna H.
    2018-09-25 15:45

    Author Jess C. Scott presents a realistic and somewhat chilling view of how technology could have a great impact on society and the planet.In The Other Side of Life, the use and reliance on technology has caused humans to become isolated from other races. It was interesting to see the stereotypes that developed from this isolation through the eyes of the characters, especially in the beginning when Nin first meets Anya and her friend, Leticia.I also liked how Scott wrote the development of Anya and Nin's relationship. Sometimes I feel that authors rush their characters into relationships in order to further the plot. I didn't feel this way with The Other Side of Life. I thought the romance between these two characters was natural and it was nice to see how it developed amidst the action and adventure surrounding them. The changing point of view was somewhat disconcerting at times because it would flip back and forth between characters often. One sentence could be from the point of view of Nin, then the next from Anya. I was able to adjust to this pretty quickly and it didn't affect my understanding of the story, nor my ability to connect to the characters, but it is something that came to the forefront of my mind while crafting this review.The Other Side of Life is an action packed read with well thought out and developed characters. As this is my first cyberpunk novel, I didn't know what to expect, but I really enjoyed The Other Side of Life. For those readers who might be turned off by the cyberpunk characterization, don't be! Just be willing to wait for the next book because the ending will definitely have you wanting more.

  • Mia Francisco
    2018-10-03 11:08

    Wow, Okay.I had really high expectations for this book, but sadly none of them were met.Like, it's like the author smushed all the interesting things in YA into one book- but badly. Here, let me list a few: Computer hacking, magical subways, elves, cyborgs, zodiac, The quest for eternal life, hypnotism, evil scientists, anti-society and many, many more.I mean, maybe some authors could pull this kind of a thing off, but not this one.Another problem: The writing style. The phrasing in this story was just so... eugh. For one, it was written in third person omniscient. Now, that isn't an evil in itself, but there was exactly no smooth transition from one perspective to another. The writing itself was also kind of choppy, as if no one had checked for sentence flow. And, as a note, it is unacceptable to use the phrase {in a piece of literature to be taken seriously} the phrase, "she had curves in all the right places". Don't go there.A lot of the reason I continued to the end of this story was that the poorness was actually hilarious. I rolled my eyes at the pages almost constantly during class. X3Um, But I like to end things on a positive note. I liked Tavia. Yes, Tavia. She was cool. And that other guy... what was he called? Dresan? I especially liked him. He didn't say very much, but I shipped him with Tavia. My favorite part was probably when (view spoiler)[Nin dies. Not for any particular hate of him, but because I like it when the love interest dies (hide spoiler)]. I also liked that they acknowlaged that Julius wasn't totally evil. I liked him a good deal too.Alright, rant over. It was an interesting book to say the least...

  • Fraser Simons
    2018-10-16 11:09

    1/5 The other side of life. This was recommended to me and I kept finding it on sites for cyberpunk quotes, some of which are great. I did not like it at all though:I really wanted to like this book and the writing itself isn't bad. But at 60 pages I had to stop reading. The characters aren't believable at all. The best I can describe it is that this is twilight, except there's even less reason for one of the main protagonists of the story to act as she does. She falls for Nin immediately, while just beforehand self proclaims herself a thief- but her and her friend trust and go with Nin right away. No problem barely any hint of distrust. It's bizarre. There's numerous references to Tolkien elves, kryptonite and other really weird things. They both fall for each other after 30 minutes in, she seems like she's not even a protagonist in the story. I get that this is young adult but it's even more juvenile than is typical of the genre. There also doesn't appear to be a clear understand of the genre by the time I stopped reading. Casually floating in Nin's view on society and technology doesn't make the story high tech and low life, both staples of the genre. In fact there's so many pop culture references in it, the author is actively working against creating a cyberpunk work. There WERE some great quotes that fall into the cyberpunk genre but they are only Nins thoughts, they're never actually realized in the story at all, up until the point I got up to, anyways.Neat concept, some better dialogue and some more research into the genre are needed though--if it's actually supposed to have cyberpunk elements as it states.

  • Serena
    2018-10-11 11:54

    Plot: This book has elves, technology, sneaky thieves, and saving the world. I loved the way the author approached elves in an urban fantasy environment, and the technology she dreamed up was amazing! It was realistic (I could see some of their invention coming into fruition in the next couple years) but still way cool :) The plot follows a couple elves and a couple human thieves on their journey to “steal back” a piece of important parchment. The parchment ends up being more important that anyone guessed and it’s a race to save the world after that.Characters: One of my favorite parts about this book was the fact that I wasn’t sure who I liked from the beginning. It takes awhile to kinda figure out the characters, who’s bad and who’s good. There’s really no clear cut “bad guy, good guy” right away and I really enjoyed that part. I enjoyed learning about the characters and what the real motivation behind the whole story was. Nin was totally swoon-worthy, Anya definitely knows how to pick her man :) I loved the connection between these two, I was cheering for them from the very beginning!!Other Stuffs: A quick thank you to the author for letting me review her book :) I appreciate it so so much! Here’s a link to her webpage! I was intrigued by this book because of the “Cyberpunk Elven Trilogy” and... that’s exactly what it was :) Elves in a modern world with super awesome technology. AWESOME :)Please visit my blog at http://pensivebookeaters.blogspot.com for more reviews, author interviews, and giveaways :)

  • Maria
    2018-10-19 11:56

    This is the first Cyberpunk book I've read, and to be honest, I wouldn't usually choose a book labelled 'Cyberpunk' to read. However, I am already a fan of Jess C Scott's work, so when she asked me to read it, I was more than a little curious.If you're not a reader of sci-fi and wouldn't usually read the genre, don't be put off by the label. This book would be a perfect read for sci-fi fans, but it also contains a love story and lots of action and adventure which would appeal to anyone who likes contemporary fiction. It's 2035, Anya and Leticia are thieves. They make their living by stealing things and selling them on. One day they meet Nin, an elf (as the author puts it, not like one of Santa's elves, more like Tolkien's). At first, they don't know he's an elf. Nin is one of a trio of elves who live amongst humans, keeping a low profile as they do not trust humankind.Nin feels that Anya is a human who can be trusted, and he lets his guard down. He asks the girls to join him, his cousin Tavia and his friend Dresan on a mission to save the world. There is the parallel story of Anya's strange attraction to Nin, the charismatic elf.The Other Side of Life deals with, among other things, the subject of mega-corporations' greed for profit at the expense of the health and survival of the planet. There are elements of magic, mystery and wisdom, woven into this story. It is an entertaining read, with some gripping action scenes. Jess C Scott's talent is boundless.This is the first book in a trilogy. The ending definitely leaves you wanting more.

  • Joe Perrone Jr
    2018-10-18 16:11

    I must preface my review by stating that I am a sixty-six year old man whose preferred genres are detective mysteries and non-fiction. Having said that, I can state categorically that I thoroughly enjoyed The Other Side of Life by Jess C. Scott.At a time well in the future, two young girls, Anya, and her friend, Leticia, encounter a trio of elves who enlist their help in recovering an artifact and returning it to its rightful owners. In the process, Anya gets more than she bargained for when she develops a love interest in the leader of the trio, an engaging character named Nin. I really enjoyed the way Miss Scott designed not only an elven world, but also a new language to go along with it. There are touches of “cyberpunk” and even some “Goth” along the way that combine to give the book a delightful, futuristic feel so popular with today’s young people. While the story itself is very futuristic and imaginative, the characters and their relationships are so well drawn as to be totally credible.I think this book will appeal especially to fans of science fiction and fantasy—particularly those young people with clearly defined senses of self, who yearn for a world that is heavy on acceptance for both offbeat and non-mainstream lifestyles.The Other Side of Life is a well thought out, beautifully crafted fantasy novel with a great plot and fully-drawn characters that are alive and engaging. It’s a book that will leave readers begging for more from this very talented writer. Congratulations, Jess, on a job well done.

  • Jeanny
    2018-10-20 14:57

    2.0 out of 5 stars Disappointed, May 13, 2011Every now and then I try new authors based on recommendations (Friends and Amazon mostly.) Well, I went totally outside my usual and for the first time tried "cyberpunk". I was a bit disappointed. I had such high expectations after all the excellent reviews. I expected so much more out of this book. I understand this is only "book 1" but i just couldn't get passed how trusting these "thieves" were. The moment they meet the elves they agree to work for them. No probing questions, No proof that the items belong to them, Just letting them have the bauble they just stole bc they say it belongs to them the elves. Annoying. In the end trust is there downfall. A previous review commented on the needless commas and the fact you get a little lost when reading scenes and imagining them in your minds eye. I second this.I will not be reading "book 2" and I usually read book 2 of a series. Even when I am not sold on book 1. The reasoning behind it is book 1 is the set up usually.The only reason i reviewed this book is bc all the other reviews are so high. I just don't understand why personally, but you know what they say about opinions...In any case I will attempt "Cyberpunk" reading again. I like the idea and elves are a change. Any recommendations for this novice "cyberpunk" ??

  • Scott
    2018-09-21 12:52

    The Other Side of Life (TOSL) by Jess C Scott tells the story about a group of elves that grew tired of their races withdrawal from the world and two human thieves that do not like the direction the world is heading. When the two groups meet they decide to work together to steal something that could be a key to changing the way both of their peoples look at the world. First off I will say that TOSL shows the views of the author very clearly through the story. Jess does not like the way that a lot of things currently work in the world and you can tell through the book. That being said the book is not just her preaching her views thinly veiled behind a cyber punk story. The book is actually a very good read. It has a lot of different elements that can appeal to a wide variety of people. There are very cool tech toys, lots of thrilling scenes during the theft, action, intrigue, romance, friendship, loyalty, and redemption. Even with all of the different themes the book does not get bogged down and keeps a fairly decent pace. This is a good read for ages 15 and up with no real loss of appeal to the older audience. If you enjoy a good spy thriller this book could also be a good one to check out as the theft has some excellent action sequences.Copy provided by author for review.

  • Erika
    2018-09-24 15:06

    This is one of those books that for me is really hard to pinpoint my rating. Most of this book was “just not for me”. I had a hard time connecting with the characters and a hard time getting into the plot. It’s a good story and fairly well written too. It’s actually a really fast-paced story but since I couldn’t get into it that made it feel like it took forever to get through. There was nothing I really hated about it either so I wonder why I had such trouble. Looking at the ratings and reviews on Goodreads and Amazon, which are all really positive, I know I’m in the minority here. That doesn’t leave me much to say about the book. There were parts of it that I thought were really beautiful and I think that’s what kept me going. The love story between Anya and Nin was gorgeous. The elven poetry was lovely. And the ending scene was dazzling. If you like elves or cyberpunk I would recommend you try it out despite my unfortunate happenstance with not being able to get into it. Perhaps it wasn’t for me but you’d end up really loving it. 2.5/5

  • Radella
    2018-10-08 08:08

    Anya and Leticia are petty thieves, in the not-too-distant future where cities are run by megacorporations and technology subliminally keeps everyone in line. Into this enters Nin and his companions, elves, for the most part living outside of the human cities and desperately trying to find a way to save nature. Nin and Anya team up to try and gain information to help the elves’ cause. Things don’t go as planned, and they soon find themselves kidnapped by powerful interests.The story was unique enough to keep me reading, but there was very little tension to move things forward. To me, it seemed like there were a lot of places where things are being repeated and rehashed unnecessarily. The characters were interesting, and watching them interact was mostly entertaining, but the character stereotyping left little room for them to be truly exceptional.There were places where I felt the author was just trying too hard, and not letting things flow in a natural progression. Overall, it’s a solid story and fairy enjoyable to read.

  • Carrie (Care)
    2018-10-14 14:02

    3.5 starsWow, The Other Side of Life was such a unique and fun read. I don't know about you, but I find a lot of YA books are just clones with names and places swapped. It was refreshing to read something so well thought out and different. You can tell the author made a point to make her work original. The theme running through the book was technology and it's impact on our earth and society. I really felt it made an impact. I can see things progressing this way and it scares me. The characters were people I would love to hang out with, especially the elves Nin, Tavia, and Dresan. I hope we learn more about them in future books. One of the characters, Leticia (the protagonists best friend), fell a little flat for me. For some reason I just didn't get her. The story was fun, exciting, and romantic. I look forward to reading the second in the series.

  • Fellshot
    2018-10-02 15:48

    See my comments. Mostly I just couldn't be bothered to care about anything in the book.I couldn't figure out what culture Anya, Leticia, and Nin were involved in... let alone how they were counter to it. There was no world building at all. And two Tolkein direct references within 30 pages? Way to try to stand on someone else's work. It could have been more interesting if Nin had been insulted by Anya's comments but then where would the potential love interest be?On the subject of the characters I found them flat and full of many words but little action or sense. When I gave up all I wanted was for them to all win a Darwin award or at the very least net an honorable mention.That was a waste of an hour of my life that could have been better spent figuring out how to set up a cyberpunk universe that uses elven sorcerers as live renewable energy sources.

  • Darcia Helle
    2018-09-19 13:52

    This book is marketed as cyberpunk but, for those drawn to more traditional reads, don’t let that label scare you off. Within these pages, we’re treated to fantasy, suspense, mystery and romance. The characters, both elven and human, are vivid, feel real and immediately drew me right in to the story. They made me care, which ensured that I would follow them wherever they led me.The plot is intricate and incredibly well crafted. At the same time, it is not so complicated that a reader would have difficulty keeping up with the details. So much is right within this story, from the three-dimensional characters to the subtle (and maybe not so subtle) messages about our current society. My only complaint is that I have to wait for book 2.

  • Lynda
    2018-09-22 15:12

    I read the description of this book and thought, “Cyberpunk elves? That sounds pretty cool.” I was not disappointed. The Other Side of Life is a fun, action-packed, sweet story. Anya and Leticia are two human good-hearted thieves that run into Nin and his elven crew. The whole gang teams up for a big heist. One thing leads to another and they just may save the world while they’re at it.This book has it all - good writing, lots of action, romance, elves, and even a mad scientist! I highly recommend it to anybody who likes a good fantasy story, or just a good story period. I can’t wait for the next installment!

  • Jason Ancona
    2018-10-01 12:00

    TOSL was my first cyberpunk read--it definitely left me wanting more. The gadgetry was cool. The thieving characters were slick, yet honorable. And the underground world speaks of a future that doesn't seem so far away. And doesn't seem so pleasant.The Other Side of Life was action-packed, had a love story that felt natural, and explored a spiritual theme in an unusual setting. Everything in the world seemed real and the characters seemed genuine. Plus they had cool names: Nin, Anya, Leticia, Tavia, & Dresan.Looking forward to reading book two.

  • Stacey Benefiel
    2018-09-26 15:49

    Another fantastic, fun and thought-provoking read from Jess C. Scott. She's combined several elements seemlessly in one book - fantasy, social commentary, romance, technology, astrology and action/adventure. Jess has a wild imagination and her writing is clean. Even though I'm not the most tech-savvy or science-minded person, all of those components in the story were easy for me to understand. I recommend everyone take a look at The Other Side of Life and I look foward to book two, The Darkside of Life.

  • Albert
    2018-09-22 08:44

    For a YA book this is well written and as an adult you can sort of relate to the characters. I do believe that this is best served to the young adult crowd and they would do best with it so if you have a 14-17 year old ripping at your nerves quite them with this book. However if you do not you may want to pass or gift this one.