Read Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand by Phra Peter Pannapadipo Online

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At forty-five, successful businessman Peter Robinson gave up his comfortable life in London to ordain as a Buddhist monk in Bangkok. But the new path he had chosen was not always as easy or as straightforward as he hoped it would be.In this truly extraordinary memoir, Phra Peter Pannapadipo describes his ten-year metamorphosis into a practicing Buddhist monk, while being iAt forty-five, successful businessman Peter Robinson gave up his comfortable life in London to ordain as a Buddhist monk in Bangkok. But the new path he had chosen was not always as easy or as straightforward as he hoped it would be.In this truly extraordinary memoir, Phra Peter Pannapadipo describes his ten-year metamorphosis into a practicing Buddhist monk, while being initiated into the intricacies of an unfamiliar Southeast Asian culture.Phra Peter tells his story with compassion, humour and unflinching honesty. It's the story of a 'Phra Farang' - a foreign monk - living and practicing his faith in an exotic and intriguing land....

Title : Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780099484479
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 384 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Phra Farang: An English Monk in Thailand Reviews

  • Shantiwallah
    2019-03-15 00:52

    It's been a while since I read this but I still remember enjoying it after chancing upon it at the old Bangkok airport. While he writes from the perspective of a foreiger who becomes a Buddhist monk in Thailand, many of the observations are of local Thai culture in general. Very interesting if you have spent any time in Thailand either working or as a tourist. He has since written a few other noteworthy books including a brilliant one called "Little angels" about the young monks who often occupy the monasteries in droves where they come from, and why they live in monasteries. I'm not sure how widely available this book is now (I see it has been republished in 2005), but if you happen to be in Thailand, you will most likely find it at Asia Books.

  • Erika Leaf
    2019-03-09 19:52

    Very straightforward depiction of life in a rural monastery in Thailand through the eyes of a British man who ordained as a buddhist monk. He is a good writer, a humble, honest person who depicts his blunders and challenges without ego and his genuine strivings as a monk plus the parts of a Thai monk's life that he couldn't quite embrace but came to understand and be at peace with. Very approachable writing. I loved the inside understanding of this part of Thai culture and would recommend it to anyone interested in Thailand's untouristed part and/or Thai buddhism.

  • Ewe
    2019-03-04 22:55

    Amazing book! I would recommend it to everybody who is visiting or planning to visit Thailand. Author gives a short introduction to Buddhism and describes the way Thai monks live their life. He alone used to be a monk so his stories are from first hand. I was reading this during my vacation in Thailand and couldn't stop reading! The book makes you understand more about monks and Thai Buddhism. On top of that it is very well written and the money from it goes to Student Education Trust that helps poor young Thai to get higher education.

  • Dave Calver
    2019-02-23 00:48

    Memories of an English Monk's experiences in Thailand

  • Chris
    2019-03-18 01:40

    Be not led by the authority of religious texts, not by the delight in speculative opinions, nor by seeming possibilities, not by the idea: 'this is our teacher'Who is whispering midlife crises when a successful British businessman of forty is turning into a Buddhist monk in Thailand?No that would me much too easy and would do short to Peters honest account of his life as a Buddhist monk. Alto he does not tell us much about his personal reasons to become a monk. For the first half of the book this kept me puzzled. Therefore the first two hundred pages of his book were just another interesting read where I was not personally involved. This changes after chapter nineteen where he begins to express his doubts. Doubts about his personal motives, doubts about the Thai way of Buddhism, doubts about how far his experience and experiments with meditation should go. Much to far I should say, when it leads to meditation in the still warm ovens of a crematorium. During my short stay at a forest monastery in Thailand I also saw some examples of this focus on death. In the temple were we meditated there always was a skeleton on display with next to it a photo of a young woman and a fetus in alcohol. I think there must be better ways to realize that we are not above aging, alto taking it at heart is for sure not an easy thing. Ways much more according to the path of the middle, which for me is a very central thought in the Buddhist teachings.Actually I was relieved to read that Peter started a charity organization to help Thai students – www.thaistudentcharity.org – After being a monk for ten years the success of this organization even leads to Peter disrobing, cease being a monk. Thereby showing an essential understanding of Buddhism, which is about leading a good life, in whatever form this may take. So a good read, especially the second half, about an interesting decade as monk. I am interested in the next decade.“Yes, Kālāmas, it is proper that your have doubt, that you have perplexity, for a doubt has arisen in a matter which is doubtful. Now, look you Kālāmas, do not be led by reports, or traditions, or hearsay. Be not led by the authority of religious texts, not by the delight in speculative opinions, nor by seeming possibilities, not by the idea: 'this is our teacher'. But, O Kālāmas, when you know for yourself that certain things are unwholesome, and wrong, and bad, then give them up... And when you know for yourself that certain things are wholesome and good, then accept them and follow them.” Gautama Buddha

  • Steve Hayden
    2019-02-23 19:49

    This is an interesting book that Peter Robinson wrote about his experience as a Buddhist monk. I was originally hoping for a bit of insight on how it was to be living in Thailand as he was a monk, but it was more of how he responded to his religious experience as he lived through the experience and what he felf as he ...developed his mental Budhist knowledge. Phra Farang is well written, reads well and I enjoyed it as a religious learning book not so much as a travel novel. Recommended for those interested in Buddhism not travel to Thailand.

  • Sally.hodder
    2019-03-14 01:53

    In this memoir describing experiences of a London business who becomes a Buddhist monk living in Thailand, there are vivid descriptions of aspects of Thai culture. I read this book while traveling in Thailand, and it brought me an understanding of the culture that I otherwise would have missed. The gradual evolution of the author's view on religion, specifically Buddhism, is interesting. Overall, however, this book is a bit slow and had it not been for the remarkable insights that it provided as I traveled Thailand, I may not have stuck it out to the end of the book.

  • Massey Pierce
    2019-02-20 00:41

    This book has a lot of detail about a personal experience of a London businessman traveling to Thailand to become a monk. Don't read this expecting to learn everything about Buddhism, read this instead to get an experience of one particular case of someone transforming into a monk. You'll learn a bit about the practice, but you'll learn more about Peter. There are funny parts, serious parts, and parts where you'll think it drags on a bit. It's all very real though and well written.

  • John
    2019-03-08 19:45

    Many travelers to Thailand see the monks and wonder what it is like to live as one. Peter Pannapadipo, an Englishman, decided to do it. Often hilarious, sometimes sad, sometimes frustrating account of Phra Farang's (Brother Foreigner) struggle for enlightenment. A very honest and forthright book.

  • Dennis
    2019-03-02 22:37

    Must Read: 5Kept Attention: 5Well-Written: 5Meaningful: 5Accessible: 5A good account that makes understandable why some follow a monastic life, without romanticizing it. Having been there myself (Orthodox and Anglican), I appreciate that it says so well what is often difficult to explain to others.First read: June 12, 2011

  • Nina
    2019-03-20 01:43

    Surprisingly enjoyable novel about thai buddhism, even though it was somewhat difficult to comprehend every now and again. It was nice to read about all the cultural mishaps Phra Peter experienced as a monk.

  • Jason Jones
    2019-03-21 19:47

    Excellent book that highlights not only the religious culture of Thailand but also emphasises many social aspects of the country in great detail, a worthwhile read before embarking on a trip to Thailand.

  • Nathan
    2019-03-11 01:50

    Pretty good. There are a few sections that really stand out, but mainly it was ok.

  • Lisa
    2019-03-20 03:36

    An interesting read if you are in Thailand visiting wats. Good insight into the life of monks.

  • Alison
    2019-02-24 20:52

    Absolutely loved this book!!I was fascinated by his experience and life. One of those books that you feel gutted when you finish it. Now plan to read his other book 'Little Angels'. :-)

  • Paul Kotheimer
    2019-03-18 21:50

    Chapter 30 (the last chapter before the afterword) was wonderful. Interesting account for anyone's thinking about ordaining as a monk.

  • Jackie
    2019-02-20 02:46

    good insight into Thai Buddhism from a foreigners point of view - wasn't so much about Buddhism as about him becoming a monk but an interesting read non the less