Read The Art and Alchemy of Chinese Tea by Daniel P. Reid Online

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The fine art of preparing and drinking tea has become a hallmark of Chinese civilization, handed down through the ages in China by monks and martial artists, doctors and hermits, emperors and alchemists. In his latest book, Daniel Reid explores Chinese tea in its manifold varieties, its long and colorful historical development in China, and its refinement as a mainstay ofThe fine art of preparing and drinking tea has become a hallmark of Chinese civilization, handed down through the ages in China by monks and martial artists, doctors and hermits, emperors and alchemists. In his latest book, Daniel Reid explores Chinese tea in its manifold varieties, its long and colorful historical development in China, and its refinement as a mainstay of Chinese culture.He describes the principles that lie at the heart of tea culture in China, the potent medicinal properties of Chinese tea, and how to cultivate Cha Dao, the Daoist way of tea, in daily life. A central section of the book explores for the first time the alchemy of Chinese tea, an esoteric aspect of Chinese tea culture that remains unexplored by modern science but was known and cultivated in ancient China. Jin Dan, the `golden elixir of life' is the elusive essence that resides dormant within tea (as in some other plants and minerals) and can be extracted, activated and transferred to the human system to protect health, prolong life, and enhance mental performance. The author looks at how and why this works, and explains the chemical transformations that take place as well as explaining the energetic transfer that takes place when tea is prepared by a Master.Illustrated with many photographs, by Christan Janzen, the book contains detailed descriptions of many Chinese tea varieties, especially the High Mountain Oolong Tea of Taiwan, which is considered by many to be the pinnacle of perfection in both the art and alchemy of Chinese tea. The book also contains entertaining tea anecdotes from the author's 'Tea Tidings' bulletin, and a useful glossary of Chinese tea terms.Tea lovers, as well as those with an interest in tea culture, the Dao, and Chinese history and culture, will find this book an absorbing and revelatory read....

Title : The Art and Alchemy of Chinese Tea
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781848190863
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Art and Alchemy of Chinese Tea Reviews

  • Russell Smith
    2018-08-16 08:52

    This book never leaves my side. Or, I should say tea table. Can't get enough of it. Never gets boring. I love the way Dan writes about tea and I love reading it. A true ambassador for the world of Chinese tea, and in particular Taiwanese High Mountain Wulong.

  • Harry Green
    2018-07-16 09:46

    Daniel Reid has always been a great source of inspiration for me. His explorations of Taoism and health have helped me a lot. I've always loved tea and now I have a great reference book to go back to over and over again.

  • Jason Gregory
    2018-08-03 05:43

    Daniel Reid has outdone himself again with his profound knowledge on Chinese culture and Taoist health in regards to this wonderful book on tea. Reid explores the ancient art of alchemy in tea which exposes a whole esoteric realm of benefits and principles that tea possess. Like any book written by Daniel Reid, he focuses on the spiritual perspective of health and why tea, and especially high mountain oolong, is imperative for the human body, mind, and spirit. At the heart of this book Reid explains with precision how Tea and Zen are the one taste, meaning that tea itself has the ability through "cha dao" (the art of tea) to bring a pure stillness of mind and creative clarity to consciousness that one only assumes comes about by meditation and other spiritual practice. This gem of a book on tea will stand alongside the classics in its own right.

  • Ani
    2018-07-27 08:42

    I liked this book but there could definitely have been some improvements. The best part was all of the information about high mountain oolong teas. I also appreciated the Chinese glossary. But there are a lot of unsubstantiated health claims and a lack of references/footnotes other than a short section for recommended reading. Also, the last bit provides the first 12 issues of his "Tea Tidings" newsletter in a condensed form but photographs referenced in these issues are obviously not in the book itself which is confusing and disappointing.