Read The Apple Stone by Nicholas Stuart Gray Online

the-apple-stone

An ancient and wise entity that takes the form of an engraved stone falls into the hands of a family of children. They learn that it has the ability to bring things to life, and they willfully and impulsively make use of this ability with varied results....

Title : The Apple Stone
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780696516108
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 277 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Apple Stone Reviews

  • Francesca Forrest
    2018-10-20 06:34

    This story is on the model of E. Nesbit's tales, but written 60 years later. I felt the author was much less successful at using Nesbit's model than Edward Eager was, though it may just be that I read Nesbit and Eager when I was more accepting.In any event, I didn't like this very much. Part of it was the narrator: I found Jeremy, the oldest brother, to be overbearing and pompous, which was a big problem. The other kids were pretty one note: responsible sister Jo, impetuous sister Missy, artistic temperamental cousin Nigel (I guess that's two notes for Nigel?), rapscallion cousin Douglas. I liked Missy and Nigel better than Jo and Douglas, and I liked Jo and Douglas better than Jeremy.With the apple stone, the children can bring things to life (with certain restrictions, though they push the boundaries), but the magic only lasts until they fall asleep. The story works hard to make up for that automatic de-tensioner by having scary-dangerous situations, but those were more distressing than heart-pounding, though the one with the Guy Fawkes Guy was pretty genuinely scary. In general I preferred the humorous moments--like with the giant sheep.The story wraps up when the author decides we've had enough random adventures. The last adventure was a good one--but it also added ridiculous drama within the last few pages.Ah well. It seems like it's a fun story if you read it at the right time of life or in a less persnickety frame of mine.

  • Francesca Forrest
    2018-10-23 01:52

    This story is on the model of E. Nesbit's tales, but written 60 years later. I felt the author was much less successful at using Nesbit's model than Edward Eager was, though it may just be that I read Nesbit and Eager when I was more accepting.In any event, I didn't like this very much. Part of it was the narrator: I found Jeremy, the oldest brother, to be overbearing and pompous, which was a big problem. The other kids were pretty one note: responsible sister Jo, impetuous sister Missy, artistic temperamental cousin Nigel (I guess that's two notes for Nigel?), rapscallion cousin Douglas. I liked Missy and Nigel better than Jo and Douglas, and I liked Jo and Douglas better than Jeremy.With the apple stone, the children can bring things to life (with certain restrictions, though they push the boundaries), but the magic only lasts until they fall asleep. The story works hard to make up for that automatic de-tensioner by having scary-dangerous situations, but those were more distressing than heart-pounding, though the one with the Guy Fawkes Guy was pretty genuinely scary. In general I preferred the humorous moments--like with the giant sheep.The story wraps up when the author decides we've had enough random adventures. The last adventure was a good one--but it also added ridiculous drama within the last few pages.Ah well. It seems like it's a fun story if you read it at the right time of life or in a less persnickety frame of mine.

  • Ruby Hollyberry
    2018-10-27 23:35

    Very much along the lines of an E. Nesbit children's fantasy novel plot, and just as good! Actually maybe even better! I would say that my favorite full-length E. Nesbit books are probably Wet Magic and The Enchanted Castle and I would say that The Apple Stone is even better than The Enchanted Castle. It is also similar in some respects (although less so) to the wonderful, fabulous Green Knowe series of children's fantasies (of which The Children of Green Knowe is the first and The River at Green Knowe my favorite). I'm not sure why N. S. Gray is so obscure here in America even now when spooky fantasies are half the intermediate market. I've only been able to get my hands on a few of his books, and they are magnificent. Much better than Alan Garner and as sophisticated as Susan Cooper if not as epic. I also particularly recommend Gray's Grimbold's Other World.

  • Kathryn
    2018-10-30 03:34

    Oh wow, I had NO idea that the same author who wrote "The Seventh Swan" also wrote "The Apple Stone". Well he did a much better job with this one, because this is one of the best children's stories out there. A group of young relatives find a magical stone that can bring things to life. AND the stone happens to be alive, and has a kind of snarky attitude, so it tends to let the children know exactly what it thinks about their projects, which are believably small ("Let's bring this fur-rug to life to see what animal it was made from," or "We brought to life the stuffed bird that was decorating our terrifying aunt's hat, and now it's flown off and she's going to pitch a fit.") In the end it's fun, and a tiny bit sad. (This, by the way, will always be remembered as the first "quest" book. Ie: my sister read PART of it and told me about it, and then we couldn't find another copy for the longest time. See my review of "The Jeremy Mouse Book" for another book I obsessed about for ages.)

  • Elizabeth Wallace
    2018-10-19 03:41

    I read this book at least 20 years ago, and it has remained one of my absolute favorite books. It's about a group of children who find a magic stone inside an apple that brings things to life (statues, scarecrows, a feather boa, that sort of thing) and it's so wonderfully written and sweet and sometimes a little sad...I can't say enough nice things about it.AND, having just reread it for the first time in YEARS, I have to say it's aged VERY well. And I completely forgot how clever the conversations are. This is definitely not a kids book, it's at least a young-adult novel, because the cleverness of some of the comments would go right over a younger readers head. It's just delightful, and very very British, which I ALSO forgot. Amazing, a very fun read.

  • CLM
    2018-10-30 02:39

    Nesbit-like fantasy set in England. Four children, Jeremy, Jo and their cousins Douglas and Nigel, find the apple-stone inside a withered apple in an orchard. The apple-stone's magic brings things to life, including bookends resembling elephants, a lost glove, a stone gargoyle, a feather boa, a broom, a stone ball, a cage of butterflies, a toy rocket, a rug and so on, with unexpected and unnerving results (some very scary aspects).

  • robyn
    2018-11-05 03:36

    Be careful what you wish for. Somewhat in the tradition of Five Children and It, but with an odder wish-granter, and a greater sense of peril.

  • Alfreda Morrissey
    2018-11-13 23:41

    This was a super cute book. I loved it, and my girls loved it at ages 6 and 8. There were some really thought provoking moments considering this was a children's book. I especially loved when they awakened that statue that only wanted peace. That was a particularly insightful conversation.When they first found the apple stone and I learned that the power is to awaken things that are inanimate, I was thinking there is nothing useful you could possibly do with that. The resulting mischief was delightful however, and I believe the children learned an awful lot from the experience.The characters are very realistic portrayal of children of different sorts and varying personalities. I would have loved to be their cousin and spend a summer at their house. I highly recommend this small novel to all children and adults alike.For a free audio version, you can download it from the kayray reads to you podcast.

  • Pashi
    2018-10-25 06:42

    3.9 I try not to compare books by the same author because I believe it's important to view books as their own work and see how they stand by themselves. But ugh, sometimes that's so hard to do when I really liked the first book I read and this one wasn't as good! Grimbold's Other World by Gray was fantastic and comparatively speaking this was a tad disappointing. But still, standing on its own, it was good. The dialogue was to die for, it had me cracking up, all the children, the puppeteer parents, the Apple Stone, and the side characters. The chapter where they bring to life the scarecrow (or some British equivalent of what I guessed was one) was positively creepy and the chapter where they bring to life the statue was beautiful and very thought-provoking. Some chapters were better than others and I'm glad to have read it.

  • Louise Culmer
    2018-11-07 00:34

    Amusing fantasy story about a family who find a magic stone that can bring inanimate objects to life, but luckily only until sunset. This causes some interesting situations - like the distraught lost glove frantic because it can't find it's partner, the stone ball (slow but not stupid) and the mischievous gargoyle from the church, not to mention the Guy who wants to burn things, and the stone effigy of the knight. The variety of things brought to life give the children some interesting and often funny adventures. The children themselves are amusing characters, especially the two feuding Scottish cousins - a Campbell and a Macdonald.

  • Warren Rochelle
    2018-10-24 00:37

    I love it still. I can't remember the first time I read this whimsical fantasy of 4 English children who luck into the ancient Apple-stone, which can make the inanimate alive. There's flashes of darkness, the mad guy/Guy Fawkes, effigy, seeking fire, the powerful Quetzalcoatl, and the sweetness of the boy-turned-demon-turned gargoyle, rescued from misery, the rocket that was alive, and the rest. Of course, magic comes with a price. Lovely book.I didn't even know I had a first edition from the UK, sold originally for 15 shillings.

  • Miriam
    2018-10-24 00:39

    Three Devon siblings and their two Scottish cousins find an ancient and powerful entity in their apple orchard. Reminiscent of the stories of E. Nesbitt or Edward Eager, albeit with some darker notes.

  • Kimbolimbo
    2018-11-07 05:30

    This was a cute book for tweens and people who like sweet innocent books with some witty humor. I decided to listen to Kara Shallenberg (my favorite Livrivox reader) read this book since it is difficult to find.

  • Kate Forsyth
    2018-10-17 07:56

    Ah, The Apple-Stone. One of my favourite books from my childhood. Why does no-one write books like this anymore?