Read Rich Land, Wasteland by Sharyn Munro Online

rich-land-wasteland

The current effect of mining in Australia : the author interviews people from around Australia on how rural and semi-rural people are being affected. It is not anti-mining per se, but it does describe how Australians arent the first on the agenda in many instances; and neither is the future of the land. Check the website : http://richlandwasteland.com/ the publishers' websThe current effect of mining in Australia : the author interviews people from around Australia on how rural and semi-rural people are being affected. It is not anti-mining per se, but it does describe how Australians arent the first on the agenda in many instances; and neither is the future of the land. Check the website : http://richlandwasteland.com/ the publishers' website : http://www.panmacmillan.com.au/displa... and the author's blog http://sharynmunro.com/...

Title : Rich Land, Wasteland
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781742610993
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 453 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Rich Land, Wasteland Reviews

  • Ruth
    2019-04-18 23:15

    Saw the author being advertised on tv .... couldnt not buy it just now in a bookshop ... this is so so so important and the type of book i will willingly hand on for others to read when finished so just say if you'd like it next ...

  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    2019-03-31 22:53

    ‘Solastalgia is the pain experienced when the place where one resides is under destruction. It is the homesickness one gets when still at home.’During 2010, Sharyn Munro, a writer and grandmother with a social conscience, travelled around Australia visiting Australia’s coal mining communities. Ms Munro lives in the Hunter Valley, and was well aware of the impact of coal there. The Hunter Valley has both open cut coal mining in place and coal seam gas exploration underway, and Ms Munro wondered whether this was unique to the Hunter Valley, or are other parts of Australia also under threat?Ms Munro spent almost a year visiting Australia’s coal mining communities, and discovered that individuals, towns and districts are suffering. The price of the coal rush is being paid by individuals and communities, while the profits are being paid to large (and apparently mostly foreign –owned) mining and gas companies.Ms Munro writes of homeowners being forced out of townships, often broken in health and spirit. Some homeowners choose to battle the huge mining companies, but at what cost to themselves and their families?‘I am talking of an invasion of our country, a taking over of land and a clearing out of people. And I mean this literally.’This is an impassioned account of the price being paid for coal at the local level – by individuals and communities. Ms Munro’s research shows that the incidences of asthma, cancers and heart attack are higher in communities close to coal mines and coal-fired power stations. Ms Munro also writes about rivers and aquifers drying up, or becoming polluted, and of fertile agricultural land rendered unusable as a consequence of mining. How can this happen in Australia? How many Australians are aware of what is happening? What role should government play in this? And, at the individual level, what will we do about it? Our rural communities, and their people, are important.‘Australia, the great quarry down under! ‘Come and get it’ – until it’s all gone and we leave our grandchildren a dirty great hole, a toxic environment, no compo funds and no future.’Reading this book is an eye-opener – especially for those of us living at some distance from coal mining activities or coal-fuelled power stations. I’d have liked a map, to help me quickly locate the communities being written about. But even without a map, I get the picture: no community or landowner seems safe from mining interests. What will our children and grandchildren think of our legacy? Is this the Australia we want to be?Jennifer Cameron-Smith

  • Peter Franklin
    2019-04-01 20:55

    This is the story of the terrible way the coal mining and coal seam gas industry tramples on the land and people. It just seems shocking that this industry can have access to private land. The book is written from the victims perspective. When travelling through the Hunter region of NSW I was appalled at the coal mines size and felt that it is not right that such scars should be permitted, I had read elsewhere of locals trying to stop these companies coming on their land, but didn't realise how terrible this industry is nor the extent of how Governments bend to the wishes of the miners at the expense of the lives of citizens and the land. It seems Governments are even worse in doing their job than I thought.

  • Lisa
    2019-03-30 21:17

    There are terrible things happening all around the world for the sake of progress and the wealth of a few. Australia is now firmly in the sights of the avaricious, the greedy and the ruthless in the form of coal and CSG companies. Beautiful places like the Hunter Valley have already been destroyed and others like the Pilbara, Bimblebox and Margaret River are next on the chopping block. We need to be aware of what has happened and what is about to happen and this sad book unfortunately outlines the mess we have found ourselves in. Every Australian should read it and be angry.