Read The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty by Nicholas Buccola Online

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Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history, was born a slave, but escaped to the North and became a well-known anti-slavery activist, orator, and author. In The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass, Nicholas Buccola provides an important and original argument about the ideas that animated this reformer-statesman.Frederick Douglass, one of the most prominent figures in African-American and United States history, was born a slave, but escaped to the North and became a well-known anti-slavery activist, orator, and author. In The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass, Nicholas Buccola provides an important and original argument about the ideas that animated this reformer-statesman. Beyond his role as an abolitionist, Buccola argues for the importance of understanding Douglass as a political thinker who provides deep insights into the immense challenge of achieving and maintaining the liberal promise of freedom. Douglass, Buccola contends, shows us that the language of rights must be coupled with a robust understanding of social responsibility in order for liberal ideals to be realized. Truly an original American thinker, this book highlights Douglass’s rightful place among the great thinkers in the American liberal tradition....

Title : The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty
Author :
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ISBN : 9780814787113
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 225 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Political Thought of Frederick Douglass: In Pursuit of American Liberty Reviews

  • David Lucander
    2019-03-02 06:48

    If you need 169 pages to be convinced that the core Frederick Douglass' political thought is within the liberal tradition, this is your book. The bad: Coming out of an highly respected academic press, it's surprising that the author chose to write "I" so frequently (11 times in one paragraph, p. 77-78) and that copyeditors didn't catch the very repetitive use of words like "robust" so often (as in phrases like "a morally robust foundation" and "a robust philosophy of mutual responsibility," whatever that means). Lots of jargon, gratuitous name dropping of other scholars, and unnecessary highfalutin' political theory. If you're not a professor or academic, this is going to be a tough one. The good: Buccola clearly knows his stuff about intellectual history, political theory, and Frederic Douglass so you're going to learn something if you read this. It's almost impossible to write a bad book on Douglass because, like W.E.B. Du Bois, he is so perfectly quotable that some degree of wisdom will inevitably shine through.