Read The Legend of Spring-Heeled Jack: Victorian Urban Folklore and Popular Cultures by Karl Bell Online

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WINNER of the 2013 Katharine Briggs Award NEW LOWER PRICE This book uses the nineteenth-century legend of Spring-Heeled Jack to analyse and challenge current notions of Victorian popular cultures. Starting as oral rumours, this supposedly supernatural entity moved from rural folklore to metropolitan press sensation, co-existing in literary and theatrical forms before finalWINNER of the 2013 Katharine Briggs Award NEW LOWER PRICE This book uses the nineteenth-century legend of Spring-Heeled Jack to analyse and challenge current notions of Victorian popular cultures. Starting as oral rumours, this supposedly supernatural entity moved from rural folklore to metropolitan press sensation, co-existing in literary and theatrical forms before finally degenerating into a nursery lore bogeyman to frighten children. A mercurial and unfixed cultural phenomenon, Spring-Heeled Jack found purchase in both older folkloric traditions and emerging forms of entertainment. Through this intriguing study of a unique and unsettling figure, Karl Bell complicates our appreciation of the differences, interactions and similarities between various types of popular culture between 1837 and 1904. The book draws upon a rich variety of primary source material including folklorist accounts, street ballads, several series of -penny dreadful- stories (and illustrations), journals, magazines, newspapers, comics, court accounts, autobiographies and published reminiscences. The Legend of Spring-Heeled Jack is impressively researched social history and provides a fascinating insight into Victorian cultures. It will appeal to anyone with an interest in nineteenth-century English social and cultural history, folklore or literature. Karl Bell is Senior Lecturer in History at the University of Portsmouth....

Title : The Legend of Spring-Heeled Jack: Victorian Urban Folklore and Popular Cultures
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ISBN : 9781843837879
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 262 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Legend of Spring-Heeled Jack: Victorian Urban Folklore and Popular Cultures Reviews

  • Emily
    2019-03-07 04:31

    Possibly the only book in existence that references both Jeff Vandermeer and Clifford Geertz in the bibliography.I did enjoy the book, but I would give it 3 stars for my enjoyment level. I gave it 4 stars because of the scope of the book and the research that obviously went into it. Language was a bit too densely scholarly at times to make this a smooth read, because I had to read some sentences 2 or 3 times. This is one I had to read twice: "...Spring-heeled Jack provided an unusual lens through which differing elements of the social strata could view themselves and others, being a site for cross-class allegiances, as well as a means of reiterating bourgeois hegemonic ideals and of reinforcing social divisions." - p 100. Definitely not right-before-bed light reading, but a good and thorough scholarly treatment of the subject of Spring-heeled Jack.This sentence basically sums up the premise of the book pretty well: "...Spring-heeled Jack's legend had no geographical centre, and was formulated less at the site of the 'event' than in the more diffused imagined community fostered by a developing nineteenth-century print culture." - p. 34

  • Peter
    2019-03-07 04:23

    This is the ultimate book on Spring-Heeled Jack. You read everything about the cultural anatomy of the legend, its cultural functions and its cultural dynamism. Besides you come to know why Spring-Heeled Jack's myth vanished with the rise of Dracula, Sherlock Holmes or Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde and of course Jack the Ripper. You get so much inspiration for further research. Brilliant work of non-fiction by a brilliant researcher who worked through a tremendous workload putting this book together. Hats off, Karl Bell!

  • Bianca
    2019-03-24 04:49

    Folklorists, ugh. Read the first two chapters if you want to know about the legend itself. Continue reading for historical and cultural details.