Read No Turning Back : A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds by Polingaysi Qoyawayma Vada F. Carlson Online

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This is the story of the Hopi woman who chose in her early youth to live in the white man's world. She became known as Elizabeth Q. White. Born at Old Oraibi, Arizona, she was of the first Hopi children to be educated in white schools. Later she was the first Hopi to become a teacher in those schools. Here her biographer records Qoyowayma's break with the traditions of herThis is the story of the Hopi woman who chose in her early youth to live in the white man's world. She became known as Elizabeth Q. White. Born at Old Oraibi, Arizona, she was of the first Hopi children to be educated in white schools. Later she was the first Hopi to become a teacher in those schools. Here her biographer records Qoyowayma's break with the traditions of her people and her struggle to gain acceptance for her radical teaching methods.Throughout her life this remarkable woman has held to the best in Hopi culture and has fought to maintain it in the lives of her students. Her story, rich in information on Hopi legend and ceremony, is a moving introduction to the Hopi way of life. ...

Title : No Turning Back : A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds
Author :
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ISBN : 9780826304391
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 188 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

No Turning Back : A Hopi Indian Woman's Struggle to Live in Two Worlds Reviews

  • John
    2019-05-14 14:26

    07/05/10Oh, for a heart as pure as corn blossoms,And for a life as sweet as honey gathered from the flowers,And beautiful as butterflies in sunshine.May I do good, as Corn has done for my peopleThrough all the days that were.Until my task is done and evening fallsOh, Mighty Spirit, hear my grinding song.She is young and has, of her own volition, joined the white mans' school in her Hopi village: Oraibi, AZ. Her story focuses on the ostracism she indured from her tribe for taking on the white mans' ways, her development into a teacher and attainment of a pinnacle of achievment.While accepting Christianity she retains much of her Hopi core values, love of space and balance with nature, but she sees an imperitive in culturally moving forward and that education is key to bringing the Indian living experience out of the stone age. She becomes a teacher. We all realize uncountable sufferings were endured by the American Indian. That is not her story. Here is a lady, a woman, that does not regret her involvement with anglo influences, no axe to grind, no recriminations.*** How well she taught, how much her methods were appreciated by those in higher circles in education became apperant when she was chosen from all the Indian Service teachers in the nation to demonstrate her teaching methods at the 1941 summer session in Chemawa, Oregon, before a gathering of supervisors and teachers from the Unided States and Alaska.***I keep thinking how this ties in with the film Koyaanisqatsi. For those of you whom haven't seen this film, I highly recommend it. Not for the impatient, but rather to be seen uninterrupted, with serene mind, to its conclusion.

  • Kendal Washington White
    2019-04-26 08:15

    I really found this book to be profound in that it helps the reader understand the challenges individuals face when they are the first to do something, or to go against the traditions of family, culture, etc. Polingaysi details her transiiton from a traditional Hopi Nation girl to willingly receiving the "white man's education" at boarding schools, and the struggles to fit in with her family and the Hopi people and also within the White society. Very well done.

  • GRACIE HAWKINS
    2019-04-21 14:20

    What an amazing memoir of a wonderful woman who changed many lives and succeeded despite the judgements of everyone else during hard times. This book taught me so much about early Native American life as well as the merging of the cultures between the white man and the Hopi/Navajos. I loved how she chose her own path.

  • Marysue Ryan
    2019-04-22 12:22

    Excellent book

  • Nathan
    2019-05-05 11:21

    GOOD BOOK

  • Laurie
    2019-05-11 07:12

    Picked this up at the Grand Canyon book store -- so far, interesting and relevant -- as a teacher, she has straddled two cultures -- I have just begun to read her book.

  • Kris Neri
    2019-05-17 08:09

    A good, well-written personal account of a woman who felt torn between her traditional Hopi culture and the white world.

  • Sally
    2019-04-26 12:36

    I absolutely recommend this. It is poignant and perspective broadening. It is a quick read.

  • Mary
    2019-05-09 08:36

    saw at GC bookstore