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resurrection-networks

It's Super Tuesday in March, 2004. Having staggered along triumphantly for ten decades with its pants hanging halfway down its collective booty and its shoe soles never touching the white line of economic sobriety, California’s fifth-largest city has been busted. Its formerly bullet-pocked mall lies in heaps of rubble, bulldozed and cyclone-fenced. The tattoo parlors and bIt's Super Tuesday in March, 2004. Having staggered along triumphantly for ten decades with its pants hanging halfway down its collective booty and its shoe soles never touching the white line of economic sobriety, California’s fifth-largest city has been busted. Its formerly bullet-pocked mall lies in heaps of rubble, bulldozed and cyclone-fenced. The tattoo parlors and bars on Ocean Avenue have been razed to make way for a future postponed indefinitely. Long Beach is down to its last reprieve: it stands like a crackhead before Drug Court, sentence suspended upon completion of urban renewal. Jimmy Ryan, 27, a recovering alcoholic and former Poly High varsity basketball player, drives a City of Long Beach detox van. On his evening break, Ryan rolls into Del Amo Park to watch the playground basketball games. Hundreds of cartons of stolen cigarettes fill the back of his vehicle. Just after dark, three people hear four gunshots. Abdul Contreras, 19, recently released from South Bay Boys Correctional and living with his mother and stepfather, is last off the basketball courts; Jin Lin, a cigarette wholesaler, walks into the park in search of her child's father; and Cole Johnson, formerly a rising star in Sports at the San Francisco Chronicle, now a stringer for the local Lighthouse-Beacon, grappling with alcoholism, divorce, and a warrant, sits on a hilltop in the park making notes for a feature he can't finish.Channel Eight's forensics expert and the hottest crime reporter in LA, Jane Fitzgerald, arrives with her crew and goes live at the scene. She’s 36, a Harvard and UCLA grad who has put in her time and developed a winning mix: dressed in capri pants slung low enough to show her navel ring on camera, she teaches her audience the science of homicide. As police comb the park, her crew shoots a tease for the news.With the steady metallic rhythms of rap and the newspaper business in the background, with the hype of crime TV and sportstalk radio in the air, the third person narrative unfolds from the points of view of Abdul, Jin, Cole, and Jane. Each has a personal stake in the fatal shooting of Ryan and, increasingly, in each other. As the mystery around the killing is tugged apart, the story focuses on the intricate, feverish vocations of reporting and selling, and on the hopes and costs of reinvention, both personal and civic....

Title : Resurrection Networks
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 15760588
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 434 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Resurrection Networks Reviews

  • Alex Daniel
    2018-12-27 12:59

    After I read Ray Murphy's RESURRECTION NETWORKS, I felt like I needed someone to talk to about it. Murphy's prose was described as "literary with a pulse," and the statement is a very apt description of this novel. RESURRECTION NETWORKS has a lot to say about media, addiction, and the American dream, but the narrative is coalesced as a sort of whodunnit where the main characters are looking for meaning in life just as much as the murderer of young Jimmy Ryan. Add a bit of violence, a dash of profanity, and a smidge of sex.I don't know if it is deliberate, but this novel feels like an exercise in voice: the characters range from inner-city young black man, an spunky Asian immigrant, a highly educated young woman, and a sports-focused everyman. Accordingly, the way these characters communicate are radically different from one another. Aside from these key cast members, there is a British(?) news editor, an inner-city homeless man, and several other Long Beach inhabitants. Murphy does a fantastic job juggling these acts and keeping them separate -- when these characters (and voices) come together, it's a pretty fun show to watch. Additionally, Murphy's dialog really flies by: there were a couple of exchanges that I read over a few times (particularly one with a doctor that occurs a little over halfway through the book -- you'll know it when you get to it).What isn't dialog though often borders on the poetic. Passages can be crammed with symbolic meaning -- this imagery was meant to be picked apart and mulled over. In most cases, it works remarkably well. At worst, it makes the novel unnecessarily clunky. With that said, Murphy excels at letting readers create the narrative's world. By showing (rather than telling), the near-dystopian setting of Long Beach, California is formed. Readers aren't always told what characters' motives are, but it can be inferred by their actions. It's nice to have an author that trusts his reader.The plot of RESURRECTION NETWORKS is strong at times, but it really took me a while to be taken by it. The crux of story involves a death of someone the audience knows very little about, and the specifics of the murder don't seem all that significant in a town that is seemingly riddled with dehumanization. The key characters also begin as pretty unlikeable: the only one of these that are charismatic is the news reporter Jane Fitzgerald. Now, I was able to invest in all of the characters by midway through the novel, when the book shows a little more of their humanity, so in the end, it wasn't a problem. The issue is that readers will need to hang in there and trust Murphy to let his story come together.The most jarring thing about RESURRECTION NETWORKS is the pacing. At times, I was reminded of Cormac McCarthy (make no mistake, the two writers have very different styles,): locations and times can drastically change between paragraphs. Because Murphy's dialog is so readable, it's hard to slow down when some of the more expository paragraphs come up. This led to me often having to backtrack and reread passages because it sometimes felt like an intermediate paragraph was edited out or completely excised.Overall, Ray Murphy's RESURRECTION NETWORKS is a pretty solid character(s) study: this novel left me thinking about the characters and story outside of the book and ever since I've finished. There are a few blemishes here and there, but if readers stick with it, it pays in dividends. I would recommend this book to anyone who is looking for a crime story that has something meaningful to say.