Read The Caller by Juliet Marillier Online

the-caller

Neryn has made a long journey to perfect her skills as a Caller. She has learned the wisdom of water and of earth; she has journeyed to the remote isles of the west and the forbidding mountains of the north. Now, Neryn must travel in Alban's freezing winter to seek the mysterious White Lady, Guardian of Air. For only when Neryn has been trained by all four Guardians will sNeryn has made a long journey to perfect her skills as a Caller. She has learned the wisdom of water and of earth; she has journeyed to the remote isles of the west and the forbidding mountains of the north. Now, Neryn must travel in Alban's freezing winter to seek the mysterious White Lady, Guardian of Air. For only when Neryn has been trained by all four Guardians will she be ready to play her role in toppling the tyrannical King Keldec.But the White Lady is not what she seems. Trapped with Whisper, her fey protector, Neryn is unable to send word to her beloved Flint, who is in danger of being exposed as a double agent. When a new threat looms and the rebellion is in jeopardy, Neryn must enter Keldec's court, where one false move could see her culled. She must stand up against forces more powerful than any she has confronted before, and face losses that could break her heart.The Caller is the thrilling conclusion to the Shadowfell trilogy....

Title : The Caller
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781742612454
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 414 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Caller Reviews

  • Cait • A Page with a View
    2018-10-22 10:33

    I am so glad I found this wonderful trilogy :) The first two books were on the slower side, but I gave them 4 stars because I had a feeling they were building up to an awesome ending!I think what made this book so much stronger for me than the previous two was how much page time was devoted to Flint's POV. (He still totally reminds me of Aragon btw. I was waiting for him to walk out at the end like I'M SECRETLY THE HEIR even though that was obviously not the plot). I didn't really have a strong sense of his character in earlier books and thought the romance didn't have much to go on. So being able to thoroughly see the situation he's in as a spy really strengthened the threat of the king and created a lot more tension. I cared about everything in this book waaaay more. AND I LOVE ROHAN SO MUCH. He needs his own book. Anyways, this might not be the most intense or fast-paced trilogy, but it's just so... wholesome haha. The worldbuilding is great!! I guess I'd recommend these books to anyone who loves Aragorn, Scotland, and/or Sarah J Maas.

  • Melanie
    2018-10-04 16:30

    1.) Shadowfell ★★★★2.) Raven Flight ★★★★This trilogy is such a hidden gem, I feel so blessed to have stumbled upon it. Faeries, fae courts, tyrant kings, vigilantes, rebellions, strong female leads - These are all so in my wheelhouse, I would have been surprised if I didn't like this series, but I truly ended up loving it. These books were so whimsical, but so believable. I truly felt like I was with Neryn on all her travels, eating the food she had to eat, sleeping in the non ideal locations, meeting all the companions along the way. I really do think that 2016 is now going to be the year of Juliet Marillier for me. After this trilogy, I just want to consume everything she has ever written. The Caller starts off where Raven Flight left off - Neryn has already found the Hag of the Isles, she woke up the Lord of the North and, as much of a mystery he is, met the Master of Shadows. All that is left is the White Lady, who seems very hard to find. Neryn is running out of time, because the revolution is coming this summer. Meanwhile, the king has found another Caller and is using him past his limits. Well, maybe I should say Queen Varda and her terrible right hand man, Brydian, are using the Caller past his limits. The king now has a fae army, against their will of course, and Flint is in charge of it. This book really shows Flint's moral dilemma and him trying his hardest to keep his head on for the revolution, for Neryn, and for the new Alban that is promised.Flint was my favorite throughout this series, and this book was no exception. He is a perfect example on how love should complement you, not complete you. He wants Neryn, but he wants her to fulfill her destiny more. The reason this entire series received four stars, and not five, from me is totally because I like a little more romance in my books. This is just a personal preference, obviously, but when you write a character as perfect as Flint, a girl needs a little something more than what that last 5% gave! “Don't punish me for what you see as your own failings. I want to be with you more than anything in the world. I've dreamed of this since that day you spoke of, the day you called me 'my heart' and surprised me with a kiss. Never mind the handfasting, if you don't want that. But please don't push me away. I know you love me. I love you with all my heart. Please give this time.” Juliet Marillier's writing lulled me into a completely enthralled state while reading these books. Maybe that's why every death hurt so much? Maybe that's why I felt so connected to the characters? Her writing definitely feels hypnotic, and before you know it you've read an entire 400 page novel of hers. The world feels so real, and there is nothing lacking in content. These books are really under-hyped masterpieces. My heart is heavy. I'm not sure I'm ready to say goodbye to Neryn, Flint, Sage and the rest of the Good Folk, yet. But, Tali and Rohan are totally going to hook up. I couldn't have been the only one to read that sexual tension. So, maybe there is hope for a spinoff? Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch

  • Angela
    2018-10-04 16:30

    I'm finding this, the final book in the Shadowfell series, a bit hard to review. Ever since first picking up Shadowfell and being introduced to Neryn, and the land of Alban that she inhabited, I was invested in this story. I grew to love the characters, the world, the magic the permeated it. My heart was with them as they were crushed under the tyrannical rule of King Keldec. My hopes lifted with the rebellion. Trust came with difficulty - and in fits and starts. I began to see how it could be done.Raven's Flight lifted me even higher. With a tighter story, the stakes raised, and my heart already connected to the characters and the world, I bit my nails as I raced through the book. I knew the entire time I was reading it that I wouldn't get the climax and resolution that I so wanted, because there was one more book to come. But I couldn't help but needing to know how Neryn, and everyone else I loved was. Were we any closer to the freedom that Alban so deserved?When I finished Raven's Flight I had no idea how I was going to manage the wait to The Caller. Somehow, with a few re-reads thrown in, I managed it. And it was definitely worth the wait. The Caller was, nearly, everything I could have asked for in a concluding chapter of this story I'd become so intensely invested in. And if this review were to be about the first 95% of the book I would have easily given it ALL the stars, an A+, everything I could have.There was tension that kept me on the edge of my seat, enough emotion to have me near tears, characters that I ached for - that I wanted to simply have the peace and happiness they so deserved. Everything I could have possibly asked for upon finishing Raven's Flight was in The Caller. I could find no fault with it what-so-ever. Because of spoilery reasons I'm having a hard time talking about everything I loved. There were shocks, and drama, hard choices, and good instincts. Every decision was hard made and thought over. Neryn and company realized the possible ramifications of their choices and made the conscious choice to deal with those consequences, if need be. I loved them for that. Things aren't always easy, there's not always a right answer; sometimes you just have to do the best you can with what you have.Then came the climax - as fraught with tension and hope as it should be. Sorrow and joy. Love and hate. It was all there for the taking. My emotions were in a whirlwind of ups and downs. I was both proud of and terrified for Neryn. She had accomplished so much - could she and her rebels do this last, biggest, thing? When it was over I think I breathed for the first time in 20 minutes.Five percent of the book left to tie everything up - and this is where I'm left slightly disappointed. How can you possibly tie up everything that these characters, this world, have been through in just a single chapter? With a hint, a hint of what could be, what might be. It wasn't enough for me. There's too much left to be decided, too much left to be done. Yes, I can imagine it for myself, but I would have liked more. More time to catch my breath, relax into new reality, and see where things were going to go now. It's really hard to get into this without spoilers....I felt I only got to see part of the resolution, not the entirety. There's a lot of doubt left in my mind about where things are heading, and after how much I came to care for so many of these characters - I want more surety.So. How to grade a novel that had me breathless throughout, and then left me feeling let down at the very, very last bit of the end. It's such a minor thing, the denouement of the novel, the place where it all comes to conclusion. Usually, I'm one that will say "less is more" here. Don't show and tell me everything - let me imagine it for myself. But here, I think, there was a little too much left to imagination. And, yet, this book - and especially this series is SO worth reading. I'd highly recommend it to anyone that has a love for fantasy and great characters. After all, Juliet Marillier only left me wanting more.4.5 Stars

  • Ashley Daviau
    2018-10-15 09:42

    I'm very sad to say that this series went very quickly from a hero to a huge zero. The first two books were excellent and I was so looking forward to this one but I was left with nothing but a bad taste in my mouth. The writing was long, drawn out and incredibly boring. I actually managed to fall asleep while reading this which I NEVER do! It completely lacked all the magic and spark that the beginning of the series had and I'm still puzzled at the drastic turn it took for the worse.

  • Masako Lin
    2018-10-15 10:42

    The Shadowfell trilogy is one of Juliet Marillier's best written YA fantasy novels, probably one of the best written trio of books she's had post-cancer and the Caller just ends this lovely trilogy up nicely. It's well written with amazing characters, good pacing and intricate world building. However the plot itself was a little too predictable and almost borderline stereotypical for the fantasy genre while the resolution and ending was wrapped up a bit too neatly for my taste. To be frank the plot failed to surprise me in any way but it's written really well and where it shines is really the characters. Neryn and Flint are an amazing couple. It's very rare that I actually like both characters equally in a romantic relationship (I usually have a preference for either party) but in this case they are both strong characters with different conflicts and I love the fact that they are GOOD for each other. I love their romance. It's so subtle (Marillier uses book 1 to set their romance while you can probably count the number of times they interact in book 2 and book 3 in one hand) yet you can just feel how deep their love has grown despite them having very very little interaction in this book (even less than Ravenflight can you believe that!)What I really like is how Neryn's portrayed in book 3. She's grown a lot from the naive lost girl that required a lot of saving in Shadowfell. Now she's greatly matured in a woman who is conflicted about how she wants to help people without putting herself and the cause at danger. I love the inner turmoil she faces. Flint on the other hand has reached his breaking point where he is conflicted with what he has to do in order to still be the King's trusted aide. The challenges and struggles they both face felt very real and the way they go about resolving them felt very matured.My heart also goes out to all the secondary characters such as Whisper, Tali, Brenn, Ean, Silva, Scie etc... Even though we only met them very briefly, each of them was fleshed out so well and had vital role to play that it would be impossible to do this without them. Marillier certainly doesn't 'waste' any characters.Overall, the Shadowfell is a lovely piece in YA fantasy fiction. Despite it being a tad too predictable in regards to a plot and not getting really 'deep' into uncomfortable emotions, the strong characters plus strong pacing makes this a favorite of mine.

  • Jo
    2018-09-26 13:38

    Bravo, bravo! This has been excellent from start to finish. I am so sad that it is finished. I now want to go and re-read some Juliet Marillier favorites - Daughter of the Forest and Heart's Blood. Alas, I have fallen behind in my review books while reading this trilogy so I cannot. I know I have remarked before on Marillier's ability to create such a complex and intricate world. When I finished the last page, I was absolutely convinced that callers existed, and a secret part of me was hoping I could become one. She weaves a spell that enthralls just as much as the Enforcers did. She has such a gift with words being able to evoke powerful emotions with a few letters on a page. And that is true magic. I'm not going to tell even one detail about the book. I do not want to rob anyone of the true pleasure it is reading this series. Suffice it to say I think this book had it all - plotting, characterization and beautiful language. If you are a fan of Marillier's already, then you know what amazing books she can write. If you have not read anything by her, I urge you to pick one of her books up. I guarantee it will not be your last.

  • Isabelle
    2018-09-25 12:26

    WHAAAATTTTT!??!SEPTEMBER 2014!?!?! WHAT IS THIS TREACHERY? ARE YOU TELLING ME I HAVE TO WAIT?!?!!

  • Susana
    2018-09-24 16:42

    (review in english below)Este livro causou-me sentimentos mistos. Houve alguns aspectos da história que me fizeram lembrar a autora no seu melhor, mas outros...Achei a cena da batalha final muito fraquinha e algo atabalhoada (não fazia mal à Juliet ler alguns livros do Bernard Cornwell). Tendo em conta que esta cena era o culminar de toda a história, fiquei bastante desiludida.Também as cenas entre a Neryn e o Flint me pareceram bastante insossas, o que constituiu outro motivo de desapontamento.Enfim, gostei, mas não me encantei...I got mixed feelings from this book.There were some aspects of the story that reminded me of Juliet at her best, but others not so much...I found the final battle scene was very feeble and somewhat clumsy (you should read some Bernard Cornwell, Juliet!). This scene being the climax of the all story, I was rather disappointed.Also, the scenes between Neryn and Flint felt quite bland, which meant more disappointment.So, I liked it, but I wasn't thrilled about it...

  • Rosanne Hawke
    2018-09-23 09:45

    I enjoyed the first two books in the Shadowfell trilogy, but I think I liked The Caller the best. Maybe because everything gets sorted at last. However, there were times I couldn't read as there was such tension, that I wondered if anything would turn out right. Juliet Marillier is such a great storyteller. Four and a half stars.

  • Shaheen
    2018-09-22 08:51

    4.5/5The Caller is a hard book to review. When I turned the last page of this book, I couldn't help but be sad. I've grown to love the characters in the Shadowfell series and the world they live in, and I've found it hard to say goodbye.Neryn has gone through so much in the last three books that I sometimes can't believe she's the same shy, uncertain girl I met in Shadowfell. She's really grown into her own and has taken her future in her own hands. Although she never forgot her place in the rebellion, and deferred to Tali (the leader of the rebels) when needed, I love that Neryn wasn't afraid to follow her instincts and support her friends.I can't talk about this series without sighing over Flint. Flint breaks my heart :( He and Neryn are so perfect together, and I love that the author hasn't tried to make their story all about how they mightn't be able to trust each other or something silly like that. Their romance is epic in every sense and I love that they never lose sight of their goal of a united Alban where they are free to be together.(view spoiler)[I didn't agree with the decision to keep sex as something the two of them had to earn at the end of the book. I understand that they couldn't bring a child into the world, and so they were abstaining, but surely they had some sort of protection they could use (sheep's intestine was popular back in the day). I think this was a really good opportunity to bring up safe, consensual sex, and instead we were treated to about six variations of 'we can't lie together as man and wife' and 'we slept chastely that one time we were together'. In fact, I think this speaks to my one and only frustration about The Caller: that the author seemed to continually under-estimate her audience and simplified too many things. (hide spoiler)]Although I enjoyed the storyline in this book, I think that it could have been more ambitious. I'm left wondering whether the author felt that simpler plot-lines would work best for a YA audience, but my opinion is that everything went a little too easily and most of the cast came out too unscathed for it to be realistic of the kind of rebellion they lead. Their success was never in any doubt, and the key characters weren't in real danger.In addition to the Shadowfell world, which is based on Scotland, I really enjoyed getting to know more about the Good Folk and the Guardians (especially the White Lady). I'm fascinated by the fantasy element in this series and loved seeing everything come together in this book, and for the human and canny populations of Alban come together for the rebellion.I say goodbye to Neryn, Flint, and the other rebels with a heavy heart. I've loved adventuring with them, and think that Marillier's YA fantasy series will be enjoyed by those who like character driven stories set in exciting new worlds.A copy of this book was provided by the publisher for review.You can read more of my reviews at Speculating on SpecFic.

  • Kriss
    2018-10-14 15:27

    The Caller is the strongest of the Shadowfell trilogy; it's filled with the best action and emotion. I cried at the end because I was touched and happy and hopeful. The romance in this series is just a touch, but it's powerful. After the first two books dragged horribly, this one is proof that the author has real storytelling skill and I am glad I stuck it out til the end (though it wasn't without some suffering--I do not think I'll ever revisit the first two books). A lot of people probably never get to book #3 to really see the story blossom because of the first two books killing off readers' desire to keep slogging through the slowness.Overall, not a bad read! This isn't a book or series I'll ever care to revisit, and I'm glad I only borrowed the books from the library, but I think for a once-time experience it was enriching in its own right. I don't really have any complaints to voice outside of the fact that this series is overall slow and takes some effort to get through--if the pacing had been quicker, the more exciting events given more time over the boring ones, this would have been a 5 star series, but due to the slowness I'd give this overall series a 3.5/5 just because I've read huge books that didn't feel half so cumbersome.

  • Nina Carboni
    2018-10-08 12:45

    Excellent series! I hope for a return to this world and these characters 😊😊😊

  • Liviania
    2018-09-26 08:43

    Flint has been a steadfast inside man for the rebellion, but when THE CALLER opens, he's ready to abandon his post because of the tragic events of RAVEN FLIGHT. One of the perils of reading so many books is that in the year between the second and third books of the Shadowfell trilogy, I'd forgotten what tragedy had happened. It took me a couple of chapters to get back into the swing of things, but I managed.Neryn has accepted her position as the Caller, and she has two more teachers to seek out before she uses her powers at the Gathering to depose the wicked king. But Flint was bringing news: the king has found his own Caller. The rebellion's plan was already a fragile thing, and now Neryn's role is more important than ever.The Shadowfell trilogy is an enjoyable throwback to more traditional fantasy. THE CALLER has an accelerated pace, compared to the gentle slowness of the first two books, but it makes sense given that it covers the culmination of a rebellion. I enjoyed Flint's increased role in THE CALLER, as well as Neryn's tendency to be more proactive as she comes into her power. I missed Tali, however, who is busy running the rebellion elsewhere for most of the novel.Given that I was a little lost just from the break between books, I do not recommend picking up THE CALLER cold. It might still be an exciting story, but one that lacks the build up. I found it a very fitting conclusion to the first two books, and only wish there could be more. I'm curious about how the characters who survive live, after. But that is another story, and this one is complete. I recommend the Shadowfell trilogy to fans of Jane Yolen and Lloyd Alexander.

  • Bayla
    2018-10-03 11:28

    Buzzwords: Tyranny, rebellion, destiny, Good Folk/fairies, magic, responsibility, greater good, good vs. evil but with shades of greyThis trilogy does not stand out to me among Ms. Marillier's work, but that's not really a bad thing - it just means I love everything I've read of hers. Neryn is a strong female heroine despite not being a typical 'kick-ass girl' - there are some of those, but one of the things I love most about Ms. Marillier's books is the variety of female, male, and fey creatures that she introduces, all of them distinct, special, not stereotypical or token. Neryn and Flint's romance is subtle but lovely, her friendships are realistic and varied, the magic beautiful and real.Cleanreaders: Violence, murder, death, orders to commit henious crimes, attempted rape, some kissing and off-page sex (young readers might miss this). I believe this would be appropriate for older middle schoolers and plus - perhaps as a next step for fans of Wildwood Dancing.

  • Rita
    2018-10-04 09:38

    Mas que leitura tão boa, viciante, prazenteira e reconfortante! A Voz foi sem qualquer dúvida o culminar de uma belíssima trilogia. Amei todo o livro, dos momentos de pesar aos de felicidade, dos de ansiedade aos de alívio. A Voz é daquelas obras que nos deixam "quentinhos" por dentro, apesar daquela pontada de saudades que fica. Uma característica maravilhosa dos livros da nossa Juliet.Gostei especialmente dos últimos tão ansiados capítulos. Toda eu me arrepiei, num momento ou outro, ou me emocionei. Só acho que o destino da maioria das personagens podia ter ficado mais claro. Mais um pequeno capítulo pós final ou um Epílogo tinha calhado muito bem.Shadowfell com os seus belos personagens e toda a sua sábia magia antiga é uma trilogia que já ganhou um cantinho especial no meu coração.

  • Esther
    2018-10-01 08:36

    I had to buy an e-book version of The Caller because the Australian publisher is only releasing it in that format for now, which is simply not fair, not fair at all. It was a great read, Juliet at her best in young adult fiction. The trilogy is highly recommended for young adult fiction readers, whether young or old, and a must for followers of Juliet Marillier's wonderful books, as I am.

  • Krystle
    2018-10-15 11:33

    2.5 stars.Wow, I’ve completed another series this year! I’m on a roll. Getting all those books off my to-read list, finally, feels like an accomplishment.Juliet Marillier is always one of my favorite female fantasy authors. She usually makes females the center of focus in her novels, has positive female to female relations, and stays away from most of the negative tropes and stereotypes. Her fantasy worlds are fun and rich with beautiful descriptive prose, and always include a romance which isn’t overbearing.For The Caller, there is much the same of that here. A larger expansion of her world, bigger cast of fae characters, and the culmination of the long running narrative. I must say finally getting out of the long travelling scenes across mountains and forests were a relief. I was getting pretty tired of it, although you can’t escape it for about the first half the book. That part was slow to read through and not as interesting.I really liked seeing all the different fae types working together with their human counterparts for a unified goal. Not to mention seeing Neryn standing alone as a character and using her own skills to stand out without the help of others. The ending was great too in that (view spoiler)[they managed to talk things through. Not everything has to be resolved with or resort to violence. Sometimes there are better ways and there is enough violence in our society already. That’s not to say there wasn’t a battle. (hide spoiler)]However, there were many things that just didn’t work for me. Neryn was simply too good. She was too virtuous and perfect. There never was really any tension to any of the scenes because she’d somehow find the way to the solution. There weren’t any scenes where the characters messed up or were beset with obstacles that were put them in dire straits or forced them into tough decisions.(view spoiler)[Okay, while I applauded the use of non-violence for the final culmination in most parts. I thought things were really lacking because we were built up to this great huge finale over the course over three books with long, long sections devoted to Neryn’s ability learning and the payoff at the end was not worth it. Sure, while there may have been a short scene of actual fighting and war going on, the way the characters simply stood up in the crowd and decried the king’s tyranny which caused everyone to realize the horrors they had been subjected to is weak and laughable at best.I really doubt brutal dictators as we are shown him to be, and his queen, would have their title taken away as easy as that and the people under their rule would be so eager to lend their support to this movement. No, they’d be scared and unwilling to make a stand. Not to mention, even if under enchantments, the king’s soldiers would sure have a lot fighting strength than that.Furthermore, what about the other people they were directly impacted and had experienced pretty horrifying and awful things? This is suddenly swept away and everything is good now? No, I don’t think so. (hide spoiler)]That being said, the ending was all right. We get resolution for the characters that really matter and Neryn and Flint’s romance reach a sweet end to make everyone happy.It’s a decent wrap up for this series but I’ve read much better from this author. But if you want a really pure and clean fantasy, then you might enjoy this more than I did.

  • Patrícia
    2018-10-13 08:36

    Opinião do blogue Chaise Longue: http://girlinchaiselongue.blogspot.pt...Despedir-nos de uma história de Marillier é como dizer adeus a amigos queridos, é como fechar um ciclo da nossa vida, é morrer de saudades de um local, de um sentimento. Capaz de nos fazer sorrir e chorar, capaz de nos enfeitiçar com a sua voz de bardo, que tece feitiços e encantamentos e nos leva para um mundo onde sombras e luz se digladiam, esta autora enreda-nos sempre em histórias pelas quais nos apaixonámos e cujos finais enternecem-nos, marcam-nos, e se tornam inesquecíveis. A Voz é mais um desses finais, um final de tormentas e sonhos, uma história encantada onde o felizes para sempre está coberto de cicatrizes mas também de esperança. O caminho para a paz é pedregoso, cheio de perigos, de perdas, de desespero. Por isso, é preciso procurar o conhecimento, é preciso descobrir como proteger os nossos amigos e ideais. É preciso manter-nos fiéis a nós próprios e sermos capazes de acreditar, sempre, que a esperança brilha, mesmo que fugazmente, nos lugares mais assombrados. Com o tempo contado e o risco de tudo perder, Neryn e Flint vivem a batalha das suas vidas. Entre o amor e o dever, entre a esperança e o desespero, ambos têm que manter os seus papéis numa causa maior, mesmo que isso signifique perderem-se um ao outro, mesmo que isso signifique sacrificarem-se pela felicidade de um mundo que ambos desejam construir.Numa narrativa cheia tanto de coragem e crença como de malvadez e ambição, muitos são os momentos em que quase nos sentimos quebrar pela dor e atrocidades de que a loucura sedenta de poder é capaz de provocar. Vemos amigos cair em nome dos sonhos, vemos magia ser usada com tirania, vemos lágrimas cair em faces contraídas num vazio de sentimentos. Mas também há momentos de luz. Gestos de amizade e confiança, palavras de esperança, olhares de compreensão, são capazes de nos fazer sorrir mesmo nos piores momentos, mesmo quando o coração se contraí de apreensão e a vitória parece muito longe de ser alcançada. Numa guerra do bem contra o mal, da tirania contra o livre-arbítrio, somos levados a conhecer o melhor e o pior da alma enquanto somos avassalados pela intensidade das emoções que cada momento e cada gesto nos conseguem provocar. Somos ensinados a compreender que a justiça, a crença e o amor são essenciais à vida e precisos na construção de um futuro, que são a base para a esperança e as razões porque realmente lutámos. Da primeira à última página é isso que predomina, mesmo nos piores momentos, é a capacidade que só Juliet tem de, no lugar mais escuro, fazer brilhar a vida.Mais uma vez, é com fervor e carinho que fecho mais um livro desta autora extraordinária. Mais uma vez, faltam-me as palavras para vos explicar a beleza e a intensidade das suas histórias. A Voz não é apenas mais um final encantado, contudo. É o final, também, de uma trilogia que, por trás de uma suposta inocência, é capaz de derrubar mentes e encantar corações.

  • Li
    2018-10-17 13:47

    I’ve been a bit lukewarm on the previous books, but thought Marillier really hit her stride in this conclusion to the trilogy. THE CALLER pulled together the various plot threads very neatly, and I couldn’t put it down - suspenseful fantasy indeed. I also liked that she explored revolution in this book - what does it mean to put the cause ahead of everything/everyone else?As for the writing, sometimes alternating POVs can really get on my nerves, especially when the back-and-forth feels mechanical, but I thought the switching between Neryn and Flint POVs were done seamlessly here and added depth to the story. I still don’t care for the Neryn/Flint insta-love from the first book, but their connection worked for me at this point in their relationship. One quibble: the villains felt slightly two-dimensional - I’d have liked to have understood their motivations a bit more, and have had more shades of grey.

  • Andi
    2018-09-30 10:27

    I devoured this book.I was on pins and needles over if everything would turn out okay for the rebellion and if Neryn and Flint would be reunited again. There was so much danger, so much proximity to the opposing side that I was praying for the best.(view spoiler)[Let me tell you who really shone in this book: Rohan. UNF. This book really brought him out to shine. Glad we got more of him. (However I wanted so much more than what was give.)The reason that I rated the book one-star less is that the damn ending was too 'perfect', too 'wrapped'. I didn't feel like I lost anyone, I didn't feel like I deserved to have an ending so 'clean cut' like the one that ended up in the book.(hide spoiler)]Still, it was a great end to the series. The ending was just a little blah to me. :/

  • Tammie
    2018-10-13 10:30

    Fabulous ending to the trilogy.

  • Heidi
    2018-10-02 09:55

    With all genre series, but in the YA set in particular, it is so utterly rare to uncover one that truly builds as it goes. But Juliet Marillier’s Shadowfell series does just that, the three books acting as one long, slow-burning story that improves with each step along the way.It’s a series where I started with little more than disdain for the Care Bear main character, and ended with her burrowed deep into my heart. The final book in the trilogy is part epic revolution, part sweeping romance—The Caller brings to life two characters who risk love for everything rather than risking everything for love.Neryn, born with the uncanny gift of a caller, has a mere two seasons in which to finish her training, master her gift, and unite the good folk and humans together in a battle to free Alban from its imperious ruler. Although aided by a myriad of friends and allies, she must stand alone as the linchpin of Shadowfell’s revolution. Neryn, her comrades, and Flint—the man who carries her heart—each tread a perilous path in which one misstep could have their cause exposed and destroyed forever. The Shadowfell series is a classic revolution story told through the masterful pen of Juliet Marillier. Weaving together Celtic mythology with her own inspiration, Marillier creates a world of deep seated dread in which the tiniest flame of hope must be held close for fear of its being extinguished.What began as a patented chosen one tale grew into so much more with one single twist at the close of Raven Flight, the book preceding The Caller. Suddenly, it is no longer Neryn’s gifts of birth that make her ideally chosen for her role in the revolution, but her gifts of life. Neryn grows throughout this series so subtly and steadfastly that it is impossible not to feel sheer and utter pride in this young woman by the series’ close. She goes from being a mere Pollyanna to a character who knows her importance and role and is willing to make the tough decisions required to put that role first, though she continues to see the world with a sort of sideways hopefulness that takes a unique way of thinking to understand. Neryn is a beautiful reminder of the potential for good in all beings. A reminder that kindness, understanding, and unfailing optimism have their rewards on all sides. Instead of a heroine who sits around feeling sorry for herself or those comrades who have fallen, Neryn shows every living creature the respect they deserve and looks always forward to a brighter day.If The Caller is enriched by the character growth of Neryn (really people, I look back to my thoughts on Shadowfell and am reminded how little I liked her), it is doubly improved by the regularity in which we are given Flint’s point of view. Flint, Shadowfell’s ears and eyes as an undercover spy in King Kaldec’s court, is nearing his breaking point. He is the counterbalance to Neryn’s unflagging hopefulness. Filled with paranoia and fear, Flint has abandoned his last shred of self confidence and lives each day only for the cause. No one can write a broken man like Marillier, and she forms Flint in such a way that no heart could resist him. We are given bits of The Caller from his perspective regularly as the book goes on, pieces that reflect how Flint himself may most desperately be in need of the mind mending task he himself is able to perform on others. The quiet romance between himself and Neryn continues, always a steady force in both lives, though never the priority. Marillier’s willingness to push the romantic plot to the background makes it all the more engrossing for the delayed gratification crowd, and the torturous wait is worth it.While I still wish that the Shadowfell series weren’t told in first person, this continued complaint is the only one I can make toward The Caller. This third installment was crafted in such a way that we are reminded of the previous volumes with no info dumps, and what I worried would be a rushed plot due to the amount of tasks left to Neryn was in fact perfectly timed and paced. The Caller starts out slow, as any Marillier work does, but her books are always worth the hard work of reading them. Despite having a very directed path, Neryn’s journey is riddled with surprising twists and turns that lead her to dangers much more imminent (and interesting) than life on the road. While it continues on with the series’ strong cast of side characters, Neryn is truly the star of The Caller, becoming a fixed point around which all others orbit in a perfectly balanced dance.If my initial criticism of Juliet Marillier’s YA was that it wasn’t as strong as her adult books, The Caller blows it away. If taken as an entire arc, the Shadowfell series is stunning. The growth of Neryn, her relationships, and the revolution itself comes on so slowly and surely that it would be nigh impossible to not feel wholly invested by midsummer’s arrival. There are tricksters, surprises, bravery, respect, and the world is surprisingly clean (ie: never one threat of rape) considering the downtrodden state of Alban. As in all her books, Juliet Marillier uses the Shadowfell series to show the strength and power that women can control regardless of their place in the world or society in which they are born. Though Neryn wields a great power, it is her own personal fortitude and spirit that enables her to use it for the betterment of those around her.In short, like most reviews of Marillier books, I find myself descending into blathering fangirldom, unable to fully or properly articulate how she affects me. The Shadowfell series was not without its faults, but in the end and as a whole I must declare The Caller to be one of the most successful YA series endings I’ve read in some time. This trilogy is a triumph in young adult fantasy, and well worth picking up for Marillier fans of all ages.This review originally appeared at Tor.com.

  • Sofia Teixeira
    2018-10-07 15:46

    Andava a guardar a leitura deste livro como quem guarda um tesouro proibido. Quem segue o blogue há algum tempo, ou qualquer pessoa que conheça minimamente os meus gostos literários, sabe que Juliet Marillier é das minhas autoras preferidas de sempre. Descobri-a através da Trilogia de Sevenwaters e foi de lá que o Bran, do nome do blogue, veio. De certa forma, a minha relação com os livros desta autora são como uma longa caminhada em que através de lições dolorosas, cheias de dor, sacrifício e abdicação, também percorremos um percurso de rejubilo, de crescimento e de cura. A Voz, último livro da série Shadowfell, traz-nos o tão aguardado desfecho no que ao destino de Alban, e com ele de Neryn e de Flint, diz respeito.Já percorremos este trilho antes, o dos mitos antigos em que seres místicos habitavam cada recanto com a sua singular magia, os quatro elementos representados, numa série de lendas que convergem maioritariamente no mesmo sentido - a fuga desses seres pela incompreensão e repressão humanas. Alban é regido por um tirano, alguém que, com o tempo e com a pessoa errada do seu lado, se tornou maquiavélico, intolerante, obcecado por um sentido de lealdade desmesurado. A cada Encontro, evento anual do Solstício de Verão, a violência e os castigos escalam cada vez mais e o povo está a chegar a um ponto de ruptura. A lealdade passou a obediência cega por medo, cada passado e cada palavra dados são calculados infinitas vezes, mas já se começam a dar alguns fenómenos de que talvez as coisas estejam prestes a mudar.Durante demasiado tempo Flint teve de desempenhar um papel que ao mesmo tempo o corroía por dentro. Neste último volume, o seu papel enquanto o homem mais leal ao rei é levado ao limite e as consequências são brutais. Enquanto isso, Neryn também arrisca a sua vida propondo-se a viver numa duplicidade em que um passo fora da linha pode condenar todos a um terrível destino. É na esperança, na fé e no amor, que também os une, que reside a força que os continua a fazer mover. É este o talento supremo de Juliet Marillier, tecer estórias que atravessam momentos tão brilhantes quanto tenebrosos, cheios de perda, mas também cheios de um ímpeto feroz, de constante superação. Ler Juliet Marillier, para mim, é uma espécie de acto de redenção, de uma certeza que sairei renovada ao fechar o livro. A candura das suas personagens, o utilizar uma sabedoria antiga para criar enredos inesquecíveis, faz com que eu tenha sempre este desejo de guardar os seus livros para alturas em que sinta mesmo o "chamamento" para pegar neles e foi por isso que decidi, com alguma nostalgia, terminar esta série neste momento - porque precisava. E a opinião de um último livro de uma trilogia acaba por ser sempre um balanço de toda a estória, sendo que da minha parte está mais do que recomendada. Um grande bem haja para esta grande escritora e para a sua capacidade em, depois de enfrentar valorosamente o cancro, criar o mundo maravilhoso de Shadowfell. Andava a guardar a leitura deste livro como quem guarda um tesouro proibido. Quem segue o blogue há algum tempo, ou qualquer pessoa que conheça minimamente os meus gostos literários, sabe que Juliet Marillier é das minhas autoras preferidas de sempre. Descobri-a através da Trilogia de Sevenwaters e foi de lá que o Bran, do nome do blogue, veio. De certa forma, a minha relação com os livros desta autora são como uma longa caminhada em que através de lições dolorosas, cheias de dor, sacrifício e abdicação, também percorremos um percurso de rejubilo, de crescimento e de cura. A Voz, último livro da série Shadowfell, traz-nos o tão aguardado desfecho no que ao destino de Alban, e com ele de Neryn e de Flint, diz respeito.Já percorremos este trilho antes, o dos mitos antigos em que seres místicos habitavam cada recanto com a sua singular magia, os quatro elementos representados, numa série de lendas que convergem maioritariamente no mesmo sentido - a fuga desses seres pela incompreensão e repressão humanas. Alban é regido por um tirano, alguém que, com o tempo e com a pessoa errada do seu lado, se tornou maquiavélico, intolerante, obcecado por um sentido de lealdade desmesurado. A cada Encontro, evento anual do Solstício de Verão, a violência e os castigos escalam cada vez mais e o povo está a chegar a um ponto de ruptura. A lealdade passou a obediência cega por medo, cada passado e cada palavra dados são calculados infinitas vezes, mas já se começam a dar alguns fenómenos de que talvez as coisas estejam prestes a mudar.Durante demasiado tempo Flint teve de desempenhar um papel que ao mesmo tempo o corroía por dentro. Neste último volume, o seu papel enquanto o homem mais leal ao rei é levado ao limite e as consequências são brutais. Enquanto isso, Neryn também arrisca a sua vida propondo-se a viver numa duplicidade em que um passo fora da linha pode condenar todos a um terrível destino. É na esperança, na fé e no amor, que também os une, que reside a força que os continua a fazer mover. É este o talento supremo de Juliet Marillier, tecer estórias que atravessam momentos tão brilhantes quanto tenebrosos, cheios de perda, mas também cheios de um ímpeto feroz, de constante superação. Ler Juliet Marillier, para mim, é uma espécie de acto de redenção, de uma certeza que sairei renovada ao fechar o livro. A candura das suas personagens, o utilizar uma sabedoria antiga para criar enredos inesquecíveis, faz com que eu tenha sempre este desejo de guardar os seus livros para alturas em que sinta mesmo o "chamamento" para pegar neles e foi por isso que decidi, com alguma nostalgia, terminar esta série neste momento - porque precisava. E a opinião de um último livro de uma trilogia acaba por ser sempre um balanço de toda a estória, sendo que da minha parte está mais do que recomendada. Um grande bem haja para esta grande escritora e para a sua capacidade em, depois de enfrentar valorosamente o cancro, criar o mundo maravilhoso de Shadowfell.

  • Maria
    2018-09-30 10:27

    про всю трилогию напишу. не ожидала даже, что такая хорошая - видимо, джульет марильер (женщина из австралийской глубинки, но с кельтскими корнями) из параллельной янгадалт-вселенной, не из той, откуда все громкие именав этой истории решает интонация - спокойная, немного сказочная, очень искренняя. сюжет простой, и если пробовать кому-то перессказывать, то и скучный. но за счет глубокого раскрытия героини, ее внутренней работы, борьбы со страхами, ее воспоминаний, горя, надежды и магии - не оторваться. хороший язык, хотя добрый народец со своим шотландским говором и заставил продираться через кусты - все эти их Ye can dae it, или вовсе This realm o' oors, 'tis full o' the strange and wondrous, ye ken? (пользуясь случаем, спасибо сериалу Чужестранка за краткий курс шотландского английского)обязательно буду читать этого автора еще

  • Melissa
    2018-10-15 12:52

    This was a good series. A lot of fantasy and deep thinking. I love the lesson this series teaches and how it's written. This was a good ending. A lot of nail biting, the bad guys seriously freaks me out and I was always worried for my characters. I really didn't know how this would end and I was happy. I just wish the characters had had a little more interaction but the build up to the end was so well done. This book has some violence and torture that is sad but is not detailed. More stuff you here after the fact and it is ok for older teens who are more comfortable with violence. There is no sexual content at all in this or the first and only a paragraph of it in the second book.

  • Quinn David
    2018-10-09 14:28

    The mediocre and expected ending saved The Caller from earning 2 stars, however it didn't save it from being a hard uphill battle. The Caller continues to plod along in a loose direction in a style reminiscent of Raven Flight. I was hard on Raven Flight because I felt that too much time was spent in introspection and mindless journeying, but I had hope at the end of that book that we were done with all that and could move on. Sadly I was mistaken. The Caller begins right where we left off, with Neryn having only completed half of her journey to find the four Guardians. Marillier, however instead of giving us a condensed version of the White Lady's training, wastes 25% of the book traveling to and learning from her, repeating the same steps we've already traversed in Raven Flight. And while the characters we meet are new and the situation itself is different, the end result is the same, Neryn has once again refined her call. Roughly 170 pages in Marillier finally changes it up and instead of continuing the monotonous Guardian journey, finally moves Neryn closer to the front lines. For the first time in 2 books Neryn and Flint are actually in the same location and the problem is closer than ever, but instead of actually making moves towards setting up the final confrontation Marillier spends too much time on the minute. Days go by following Neryn as she makes poultices and potions and eats dinner in the dining room with Daven. The problem is not that the pacing is slow so much as the fact that the pacing is slow and there is little dialogue to break it up. Instead The Caller is made up of pages and pages of descriptions and feelings, of fears and longing. Over and over and over again without change. By the time Marillier again breaks format and jumps to the conclusion there are only about 50 pages of the book involved in the final showdown, which considering we've been waiting a combined 1150 pages for it, in hindsight, was underwhelming. My final frustration lies in the fact that again Neryn and Flint have almost no time together. Before the concluding chapter they have exactly 2 scenes together that last approximately a total of 4 pages. 4 pages out of 400! It is mind boggling how underutilized this sweet slow burning romance was. Truthfully after the disappointing end of Raven Flight (in which their relationship was also underutilized) I had hope that the final confrontation would bring Neryn and Flint together working towards a common goal. It did not. Even more confusing the fact that Shadowfell exists solely on the journey between the two. And it was beautiful because of that. Even more than romance it was their companionship that really sold that book and proves that you don't need constant forward plot progression if there are characters relationships to rest on. Marillier instead chooses to abandon their relationship in favor of filling pages and pages with again a new cast of ultimately minor characters, half of which are dead by the end. I truly had to fight my way through to the end of this book. At no point did I ever consider DNFing it but it truly was a struggle and it felt as if it was only my desire to see this through to the resolution rather then true interest that kept me going.

  • Carina Carvalho
    2018-10-04 09:43

    Este volume foi sem dúvida o que teve mais desenvolvimentos. Adorei a forma como Neryn evoluiu e Flint teve uma papel mais preponderante. Uma trilogia que nos fala de luta por liberdade, luta por direitos, esperança e acima de tudo a luta do bem contra o mal

  • Rachel
    2018-09-26 09:43

    How does Juliet Marillier do it, each and every time?Full series review: When it comes to fantasy done right, I have two people I go to: Robin McKinley and Juliet Marillier. Never have they disappointed, and when it comes to Juliet Marillier, after reading the Shadowfell books, that statement stands. I remember being excited for Shadowfell a long time before it released, I got an egalley, started it...and lost steam. I was pretty afraid I'd found one of her books I couldn't get into. I set it aside. For a long time. Years. I bought a paperback copy on a whim at least a year ago, which then sat around for a long time. Until a couple of weeks ago, when I had the biggest need for some fantasy, and I figured it was time for another try. BOY WAS IT EVER.When I first tried Shadowfell, I got stuck in the first hundred pages. They're pretty slow. There's plenty going on, but it still manages to be very introductory. And yet, once I got past those hundred pages, I flew through the remaining 1,100 pages of the series with no problem whatsoever. Never a sticking point, never a moment where I thought I should back off and read something else. Once Neryn and Alban got me, they had me. Shadowfell in and of itself is good, but it never really stood up to my favorites from Juliet Marillier. This is partially, obviously, because my favorites are her more sprawling, intricate adult fantasies, and partially probably just the book itself.A lot changed with Raven Flight, though. Since all that pesky world-building is, for the most part, done--as are most of the character introductions--you really get into the meat of the world and of Neryn's journey. There's a lot of travelling back and forth through Alban in the three books, but in the last two it's mixed in so well with important moments and character development that it really doesn't drag ever. And the characters have such a wonderful arc over the series, which is obvious no matter what, but highlighted all the more in the quick succession in which I read the series. Neryn is small, quiet, and principled, raised to value the old ways of Alban. As she develops her gift as a Caller, not only does she become more skilled and connected to the land, but she also becomes more confident. The girl who finishes the series is definitely not the one who started it. With Flint, most of his development comes in the first book, but we're given more glimpses into his past and that development throughout the final two. You see just how hard the life he lives is, and the toll that takes on him, each and every day.The Caller felt like it was all rising action. There's a rebellion that's going to happen, whether its key players are ready or not, and each page turn takes you closer. It's not necessarily a bad thing, but I felt a bit like I was living for the final pages. At the same time, Juliet Marillier really threw in some unexpected turns, which both kept me on my toes and made me realize that the events leading up to the finale definitely were not set in stone--which was something my forward-thinking mind had done. The finale itself is brutal at times, hard for someone who so quickly and completely became entrenched in the world of Alban, but it's so worth it.Juliet Marillier's books are a treasure to me. There are so few authors whose work I connect with each and every time, but she's never failed me. Her writing is, without fail, peerless and completely gorgeous. If Shadowfell is a series you tried and stopped, or haven't tried at all but you like fantasy, I hope you'll give it a chance--past the first one hundred pages of Shadowfell. Neryn, Alban, and the Good Folk will enchant.You can find this review and many more fun things on my blog: Paper Cuts.

  • 재스민♡
    2018-10-05 09:42

    between 3.5-4The thing I that I really loved about the book was Flint's character. Since he was a spy at court and Keldec's confident, the stress and danger can really pile on. You can see that he was breaking down, mentally and physically exhausted at his pretense. I'm not surprised since such a thing can really damage one's psychological mindset. In other stories, such a character wouldn't really exist. He/She would be acting tired, but not to the point where Flint was: ready to give everything up. I'm actually glad that I could see what was happening in Flint's mind. It seemed more realistic.I was hit with sorrow at the end when Neryn was told who died in the battle, however short it was. They were friends who braved through tough times together, friends who worked together, friends who encouraged each other, and family under Alban's sky. Just now, all this reminded me of Akame ga KILL!, Vol. 1: rebels who were friends and family in secret working to overthrow the corrupted king. They all worked together and watched each of their comrade fall along the way to their goal. It's upsetting. When they decided what to do with Keldec and Varda, I thought "Just kill Varda." Her character was a despicable one. For Keldec, I felt a little sorry for him. Both Neryn and Flint saw something in Keldec if he didn't become the person everyone knew him as. I guess that would have been for me too. Brydian was annoying pest. Esten. I don't know if I should sorry for him or don't care. He seemed to be pitiful, but he's the kind who craves for power once he gets it, you know.Honestly, the end was a bit disappointing. It seemed a little rushed, but Neryn is Caller so she couldn't have done much. I understand that with the rebellion over and the land was working to be free, Neryn and Flint would want to spend time together. It's nice and all but I'd prefer it if we got a chance to see the meeting unfolding, see how things worked out and what was to be done for the new age. Oh well. Maybe in the future, there would be a special: the meeting or a glimpse at ALban's new age.I'm done now.

  • Josiphine/Tessa
    2018-10-22 15:38

    3.5The beginning and middle were mostly boring with short stints of interest (especially after Neryn went to that place) but the end and climax were incredible.This book could have been a lot shorter. There were a lot of filler parts that did nothing to enhance the plots or characters, just bogged the story down. Better than the second but not as good as the first.