Read Mrs Ronnie of Polesden Lacy by Siân Evans Online

mrs-ronnie-of-polesden-lacy

An intriguing illustrated biography of the remarkable Mrs. Greville and her magnificent house, Polesden Lacy—a fascinating life story laced with scandal, wit, and intrigue, set against the backdrop of 80 years of tumultous world eventsFrom obscure and humble origins Margaret Greville rose to become a millionairess and prominent society hostess and friend to a portfolio ofAn intriguing illustrated biography of the remarkable Mrs. Greville and her magnificent house, Polesden Lacy—a fascinating life story laced with scandal, wit, and intrigue, set against the backdrop of 80 years of tumultous world eventsFrom obscure and humble origins Margaret Greville rose to become a millionairess and prominent society hostess and friend to a portfolio of royalty and politicians. Following an advantageous marriage to one of Edward VII's best friends, Captain Ronald Greville, Mrs. Greville created two magnificent houses, Polesden Lacy (now National Trust) and 16 Charles Street, Mayfair, taking as her model the opulent luxury of the Ritz Hotel. Mrs. "Ronnie" Greville was instrumental in advancing the courtships of both the Mountbattens and the Duke and Duchess of York, who became King George VI and Queen Elizabeth after the Abdication, and in fact, honeymooned at Polesden Lacy. Among her friends she numbered Edward VII, Queen Mary, George VI and Queen Elizabeth, Oswald Mosley, Ribbentrop, and Mussolini. Her meteoric rise to social prominence was lived against a background of tumultous historic events: the halcyon years of the Edwardian era, the Roaring 20s, the Depresssion, two World Wars, and the London Blitz. Mrs. Ronnie survived for almost eight momentous decades and was in the front row for many of the great moments in history. This is her thrilling story and that of her magnificent house, Polesden Lacy, illustrated many previously unpublished evocative period photographs....

Title : Mrs Ronnie of Polesden Lacy
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781907892387
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 176 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Mrs Ronnie of Polesden Lacy Reviews

  • Penny
    2018-09-30 08:11

    This was a coffee table type book in appearance, large but quick and easy to read. Too easy really - repetitive in places and a bit flat and shallow. However, Mrs Ronnie led an amazing life, she 'knew everybody' and she was absolutely stinking rich (a 'beeress' with her father making millions from McEwans lager) so it would have been very hard to write a dull book about her.I loved the way she used to deck herself in her most fabulous emeralds and diamonds during the Blitz, so that if a bomb hit 'she'd go out looking wonderful'.A lot of her jewellery was beyond beautiful and was bequeathed to the Royal Family who still wear it, especially the Granville Tiara.Her amazing home Polesden Lacey is now owned by the National Trust who published this book. Mrs Ronnie had no children and originally intended to leave the house to 'Bertie', the second son of George V. However, in a strange twist of fate, Bertie became king when his elder brother abdicated following his affair with Mrs Simpson and Mrs Ronnie handed the property to the NT instead. The glossy illustrations were gorgeous and stopped me from giving this a 2.5 which is probably what it really deserved!

  • Margaret Sankey
    2018-09-30 09:20

    Margaret McEwan Greville was the legitimized daughter of an Edinburgh beer baron, safely married off into the aristocracy before WWI, Edwardian society hostess, widowed in the 1920s, confidante of the royal family, matchmaker of the upper class in Britain, collector of Indian princes, and despite being a friend of Sir Ernest Cassel and the Rothschilds, an early admirer of Mosley and Hitler. This is an extraordinary life, but presented in a book that would be at home in the gift shop of her now National Trust country house--it is a narrative of fancy parties and jewels worn, and showing off ties to the Windsors. A better book would have seen this life in the context of the huge upheavals to Britain from the 1880s to WWII, or, even more interestingly, how someone like Greville could stay so insulated from them.