Read Flashing Before My Eyes: 50 Years of Headlines, DeadlinesPunchlines by Dick Schaap Mitch Albom Online

flashing-before-my-eyes-50-years-of-headlines-deadlinespunchlines

Muhammad Ali stretched out on a brown couch, a towel across his waist, while an air conditioner fired cool air across his body. It was a scorching Manila morning, and in thirty minutes Ali would go to war with Joe Frazier for the third and final time. Ali yawned and stared at the ceiling of his dressing room. "Just another day's work," he said. "Just gotta go beat on anothMuhammad Ali stretched out on a brown couch, a towel across his waist, while an air conditioner fired cool air across his body. It was a scorching Manila morning, and in thirty minutes Ali would go to war with Joe Frazier for the third and final time. Ali yawned and stared at the ceiling of his dressing room. "Just another day's work," he said. "Just gotta go beat on another man." The reporter did what a reporter is supposed to do. He listened and wrote down Ali's words.And so began just another day's work for Dick Schaap, who in the past half-century has carved out his own legend, not with his fists but with his reportorial verve, his indefatigable curiosity, and his irrepressible wit. Now, in Flashing Before My Eyes, the longtime ABC correspondent and host of ESPN"s The Sports Reporters recounts a charmed career in which he has met almost everyone and seen almost everything. He has played golf with Bill Clinton, tennis with Bobby Fischer, cards with Wilt Chamberlain. He has written books with Joe Namath and Joe Montana. He has taken Brigitte Bardot to dinner and Lenny Bruce to a World Series. He saw the Baltimore Colts beat the New York Giants in sudden-death overtime, and the Green Bay Packers beat the Dallas Cowboys in the Ice Bowl. He saw Bill Mazeroski end a World Series with a home run, and Willis Reed lift the New York Knicks to an NBA title. He has covered murders and riots, presidential campaigns and Broadway openings. He introduced Muhammad Ali to Billy Crystal, and Billy Crystal to Joe DiMaggio. He walks with sluggers and senators, cops and comedians, authors and actresses, and he shares the sights he sees and the words he hears in stories that make you laugh and cry.With an introduction by Tuesdays with Morrie author Mitch Albom, Schaap's memoir gives the reader the ultimate highlight reel of the last fifty years and makes a compelling case that if Dick Schaap wasn't there to see it, it didn't happen....

Title : Flashing Before My Eyes: 50 Years of Headlines, DeadlinesPunchlines
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780380975129
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 300 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Flashing Before My Eyes: 50 Years of Headlines, DeadlinesPunchlines Reviews

  • Mike
    2019-02-02 10:13

    A gentle and genial summer rain of dropped names and anecdotes that run the gamut from the hilarious to the profane to the profound. Dick Schaap was a polymath and renaissance man and in this winning memoir holds the door for you and ushers you into rooms you wish you could have been in.

  • Yoshi Perkoff
    2019-02-01 05:11

    I'm sure quite a few people are going to call bullshit on this post, but what I'm writing is the truth. Dick Schaap was my grandfather. I lived my life for 11 years walking next to this great man, this man people loved and cherished and respected. A man who was a giant in his time, who knew "everyone". I can also tell you that he was a family man before anything else. When this book came out he took the time to come down to my school, my little suburb elementary school, and give a presentation to the class about his work and what he did as a journalist. But it wasn't just that. Hang around at his apartment, or his ranch, and people like Mohammed Ali, or Billy Crystal, or "Broadway" Joe would stop by. To me these people weren't famous, they were my grandad's friends. I never understood why people were so excited about my grandfather, his friends, all of that show biz stuff...that is until I finally sat down and pulled my copy he signed for me off my shelf and read it. I knew some of these stories already of course, but looking back at it now, with the insights he provided in this book, I feel like I only knew half of him. After finishing this book I feel as though I know him now. Not just as my grandfather, and not just as Dick Schaap of ESPN, but as the man Richard Jay Schaap. Quite honestly this is one of my favorite books I have ever read because it gave me something nothing else could, it gave me my Grandfather back over 10 years after his death. Nothing is more amazing than that.

  • Stephen
    2019-02-06 11:37

    Dick Schapp knew almost everyone and those he didn't know probably knew him. His autobiography, while short on personal insights, is fascinating journey through the career of a journalist and writer who was the Isaac Asimov of "as told to" books. If there was ever someone who should be on your short list for "stuck on a desert island with nothing but conversation to fill your time" it should be Dick Schaap. The world is a poorer place without him and his erudite and accessible stle of revealing us through the stories of others.

  • TheLongWait
    2019-02-07 05:26

    Yes...Dick Schaap knew everyone. But its his integrity that bleeds from every page. Dick often gets overlooked when discussion about "new journalists" comes up. And true his work was not as flashy as Thompson, nor as driven as Breslin, nor as deep as Capote. But he was there putting pen to page in ways that no doubt made the others envious.

  • Michael Dixon
    2019-02-03 11:20

    not normally a fan of name dropping, but, this book is a rollicking good time. A tour through the second half of the 1900s as seen through the lens of sports, and journalism, with stops at practically every major event, and personal glimpses into the characters that made them happen. A really great read. I recommend this to sports and pop culture fans of the 1960-90 time period.

  • Matthew
    2019-01-31 11:18

    It was alright. But most of the info schaap talked about was related to baseball which was not what I expected. He would have made it better by talking about sports such as golf.

  • Joe
    2019-02-04 09:19

    A really interesting and honest memoir from someone who lived a truly interesting life.

  • Tom Delise
    2019-01-30 12:13

    I miss Dick Schaap.

  • Yofish
    2019-02-09 12:12

    Dick Schaap knew *everyone*. And isn't afraid of name-dropping. Lots and lots of good stories here. Might have been better in print; he reads it himself, leaving room for rim-shots.

  • Scott
    2019-02-11 09:37

    Miss and love Dick Schaap.