Read March, Women, March by Lucinda Hawksley Helen Pankhurst Online

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March, Women, March explores the women's movement in Britain, from the Vindication of the Rights of Women in 1792 to women attaining the vote in 1928. Published to commemorate the centenary of the death of the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who was dragged under King George V's horse during the Derby and thus sustained fatal injuries, this fascinating book uses anecdotMarch, Women, March explores the women's movement in Britain, from the Vindication of the Rights of Women in 1792 to women attaining the vote in 1928. Published to commemorate the centenary of the death of the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who was dragged under King George V's horse during the Derby and thus sustained fatal injuries, this fascinating book uses anecdotes and accounts by both famous and hitherto lesser known suffragettes and suffragists to explore how the voice of women came to be heard throughout the land in the pursuit of equal votes for females. Using diary extracts and letters, the main protagonists of the women's movement are brought back to life as Lucinda Dickens Hawksley explores how they were portrayed in literature and art as well as the media reports of the day....

Title : March, Women, March
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781780121123
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 272 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

March, Women, March Reviews

  • Lisa Bywell
    2019-02-18 19:31

    An incredibly enjoyable and very readable account of the fight to get the vote. I was outraged for what women suffered and inspired by what they achieved. Would l have been a suffragist or a suffragette I wonder...

  • Kay
    2019-01-24 22:37

    This is an admirably clear book about the fight for the recognition of the rights of women and for the struggle for women's suffrage.

  • Kat O'Connor
    2019-02-02 16:22

    I've just finished this book yet and overall, I enjoyed it. I already had an outline knowledge of the suffrage movement and this has definitely furthered my understanding with some fascinating details and engaging outlines of the main characters involved. However at times I've found it frustrating for a number of reasons. Sometimes it reads like an early draft because there are several typos (on a single page there is a rogue apostrophe in "Houses" and the date of Davison's protest at the Epsom Derby is given as 1912, not 1913, for example); also, sometimes the grammar is clunky and the footnoting is very sporadic - there hardly seemed to be any footnotes in the first half of the book. Not sure if this is just a Kindle issue perhaps. I agree with another reviewer that although it is well-paced, the structure doesn't always seem logical and the chapters end quite abruptly. Finally there are a few points that I'd like to have seen analysed in more depth, for example the reasons behind the anti-suffrage movement, and in particular why some women were adamant that they didn't want the right to vote. Hawksley sometimes abandons neutrality and the tone can be quite emotive instead. Overall though, I am enjoying it and it is worth a read! Would be interesting to see how it compares with other books on the same topic. Another positive was the exploration of the progress of women's rights after the 1918 Act and the revelation that Marie Stopes' pioneering work on family planning was partly driven by some very dodgy beliefs on "hygienic" breeding...

  • Tim Rideout
    2019-02-01 16:37

    ‘The Times announced that the new bill [The Representation of the People (Equal Franchise) Bill] had enfranchised 5,240,000 more voters. Britain now had more female voters than male. It had been a century and a half since Mary Wollstonecraft had published A Vindication of the Rights of Women, but at last women in Britain had a fully enfranchised voice.’Charting the establishment of full women’s suffrage from the publication of Mary Wollstonecraft’s ground breaking ‘Vindication’ in 1792 to the achievement of full women’s suffrage on the same terms as men in 1928, Lucinda Hawksley’s book provides an excellent overview of each key stage in that hard fought journey.From a perspective in 2018, the achievements of the suffragists and suffragettes must be celebrated, both as a commemoration of what was achieved, but as importantly to mark the work still necessary to secure true gender equality. There is still so much to be done.

  • Siv
    2019-01-23 19:40

    Met the author last year a great speaker who talks to her audience with exceptional warmth and honest and insightful appraisal of her subject Highly recommended

  • Gayle Noble
    2019-01-28 16:23

    I have read books on suffrage before but this one was particularly interesting. The author did not keep to only the well-known faces of suffrage (such as the Pankhursts) but talked about women who have now been forgotten but who contributed so much to the suffrage cause. The later chapters were the most difficult to read when the author talked about the state sanctioned practice of force-feeding those on hunger strike in prison, how this was done dozens of times leaving victims with permanent health problems, and also when protesters were violently manhandled by both bystanders and the police, some of which constituted sexual assault. This book should be required reading so that future generations are aware of the sacrifices made and horrors endured by these women (and men) in order to obtain the vote and to gain equality in the eyes of the law for women with regards to family law, earning money and control of property.

  • Christine Blachford
    2019-02-11 20:26

    I've tried to read a few historical books and this is one of the first that has grabbed my attention so I can see it through to the end. I don't know if it's the subject matter or the writing but either way, it was an interesting read and an educational one as well.Documenting the story of women searching, campaigning and battling for equal terms, laws and votes as men with suffragettes the key to the story. I've heard of people chaining themselves to the railings, of course, but this goes far deeper. I hadn't realised the fight for equality started so early on, and that it took so long!A fascinating book, well balanced and showing the good, the bad and the ugly of the suffragist and suffragette movement, and those that opposed the cause.

  • Mary
    2019-02-13 19:24

    A succinct and brilliant history of the fight for equality for women, in particular in relation to the vote and to be recognised as individuals.

  • Sarah Mccloskey
    2019-02-20 17:24

    'The only measure which can satisfy us is one which shall secure to women the same rights to their own property and earnings which are enjoyed by men' - Elizabeth Wollstenholme

  • Meg
    2019-01-24 15:35

    An excellent and comprehensive look at the quest for women's suffrage that really helped me get my head around what happened and when. Fascinating stuff.

  • Laura Noakes
    2019-02-06 21:45

    Concise and interesting history of the women's suffrage movement in the UK.