Read Bighorn by Erin O'Quinn Nya Rawlyns Online

bighorn

Truckee . . . you can call him Truck.A mixed-blood native man on the road to visit his spirit heritage in the Wheeler Peak range in Nevada.  A man life has seemed to bludgeon, by the look of his craggy features and eff-off attitude. Life hasn’t handed Truck any breaks. The only man besides his father he has ever loved was killed in Iraq, now only a memory that eats at hisTruckee . . . you can call him Truck.

A mixed-blood native man on the road to visit his spirit heritage in the Wheeler Peak range in Nevada.  A man life has seemed to bludgeon, by the look of his craggy features and eff-off attitude. 

Life hasn’t handed Truck any breaks. The only man besides his father he has ever loved was killed in Iraq, now only a memory that eats at his gut. His wind spirit, born of his Paiute heritage, drives the wilderness images he pens and draws for a living. 

And then one day, hitching a ride on the Loneliest Road in America, he accepts a lift from a good looking, arrogant man named Dominic Majors.Call him Dom. A man who lives up to his name . . .

Running from a lifestyle that is sucking his soul for no emotional gain, Dom thinks he can find a kind of salvation in his work for the Federal Wildlife Agency, helping to save the mountain bighorn.

At the end of a trail, literally as well as emotionally, he sees a hitchhiker with impossibly broad shoulders and black suit on a lonely road to nowhere. Curious, needing a companion for the long trail ahead, he stops for the giant man with an even bigger ’tude. 

And then begins the ride of their lives....

Title : Bighorn
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780989249683
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 192 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Bighorn Reviews

  • Susan Laine
    2018-12-18 06:35

    4.5 stars. How to put this reading experience into words? This is definitely unlike any erotic romance I’ve read before. Took some getting used to—but it was well worth it.To start with, there’s an amazing lyrical quality to the writing style that is impossible to miss. In the capable hands of Ms. O’Quinn and Ms. Rawlyns, the English language becomes a thing of beauty. However, in the first part of the book there’s an info dump about the backgrounds of Truckee and Dom. By then, I was anxiously waiting for the story to start. Still, with patience, this wait didn’t take much out of the story. Just a point to note.Also, what we have here is what I like to call “the soul connection“. A common trope in romance novels. Two (or more) people meet, and without speaking much at all, there’s a powerful instinctive bond. Let’s call it fate, shall we, or true love. Truckee is a reserved man and Dom is surly, so they don’t talk much. At all. And yet… they are instant soul mates. Now, don’t get me wrong. There’s a purpose to this approach. Both men are truly alone. I mean loneliness with a capital L. And, as is said in the story, it’s not so much what they say than what’s between the pauses, hidden yet visible if you stop to look. Truckee and Dom need and want each other, but both are broken and been burned before, so they almost take too long to come to terms with their feelings, let alone admitting them to one another. The L word is the hardest to say, apparently.To help mediate their unspoken mentalities, we have BDSM. Reluctant Truckee has no experience with this, and Dom’s used to being, well, the dominant one in casual one-nighters that serve no purpose. Only… that’s not the role Dom wishes to undertake, and Truckee is in for a learning curve, offering a touch of discipline to tame the cocky Dom, to transform their climaxes from good to ecstatic. Every scene between these two men is ripe with immense sexual tension. Every look, every held-back word, every gesture is a sign of what they both want, yet are unable to express. It’s kind of funny, really, that what they cannot say is given to us, the readers, with eloquent and poetic language that takes our breath away, transporting us to another world. In fact, if there’s one thing about this story that makes it stand apart from the rest of this genre, it’s immersion. The evocative writing pulled me in, and left me disoriented when I stopped reading and had to go back to the real world.Now, after all that gushing, here’s a few drawbacks. Sometimes I was left a little confused as to what was happening. Let me explain. I couldn’t always tell where the guys were in relation to each other, or turned to what direction, or where in the room they were. That sounds weird, I know, but because of the highly descriptive language that focused on emotional turmoil and inner workings I couldn’t get a handle on the tangible world, so to speak. It was like the spatial relations were a bit wonky. That is, however, no reason to not read this. After all, perhaps it was just me. We all have differing reading experiences.For a short story, we get amazing insight into Truckee and Dom. Truckee’s Indian heritage is intriguing, and Dom’s job provides the suspenseful action in the story. In fact, while the first part of the story is character-driven, the action sequences are stark and harsh, blood and danger of death awfully real and scary. In comparison, the sensual and sexual scenes are potent in every sense of the word. The energy between the two men is all but frightening with its magnitude, so compelling and erotic it cannot be ignored or dismissed. I relished every moment.In the end, this is a unique piece of writing, I have to say. I believe the feel of this book will remain with me for quite a while. There’s an almost tardiness to the storytelling, a slow build of a true connection that grew beyond dialogue. No words needed.Highly recommended.

  • Susan
    2018-12-15 04:45

    This is a very difficult review to write. Not because I didn’t enjoy the book (I did) or it’s not well-written (it is). Because I’m totally bowled over by the fierce astringent beauty of it: the characters, the setting, the story. This book has moved me in the depths of my hidden secret self, the one I don’t even show to ME most of the time. The story of these two men is sacred; it is holy: I fear to touch it with my mortal words.But I will try.Nya Rawlins and Erin O’Quinn have teamed up for the first time; I beg the wind spirit that it will not be the last. Each is a stunning writer on her own; together they are the reflection in the eye of the eagle: perfect, sublime, riding the current of their words to show us the world spread in beauty beneath them.The story is set in Nevada, Erin’s home state, and her attachment to the very soil of the place illuminates the book as the full moon illuminates the night. She knows the bones of Nevada, the bones of earth and stone and sage and stream. Through her eyes, we see this land of welcomed solitude, where each scrap of life takes on meaning in ways it cannot in the midst of noisy invasive knots of harried people. She and Nya both have a deep respect for the purity of Native American thought, and song, and practice, and that’s readily apparent here.It would have been simple to write a cliched romance, one partner being a sort of Native American paperdoll paraded across a poorly plotted stage into the arms of a white man. There isn’t a puff of a breath of that in this book. Truckee, the Native American, loves his heritage, his birthright, and expresses that love in poems and in drawings. He’s quiet, contained, respectful, humble: all things one would expect from a Native American. Part of what makes him so very much more than a cliché is his relationship with Dominic.Dominic is a federal research specialist, with a twist. He’s studying the poaching of big game animals (specifically, bighorn sheep), and he has the firepower and know-how to put a stop to the horror that is exploitation for profit.The two meet when Dom, on a whim, picks Truckee up as he’s hitching toward his summer living quarters. Each man is laconic; each carries an emotional burden he needs to drop; each desires the other. But Dom isn’t just short for Dominic; this man is a dominant, has delved into the world of big city BDSM clubs, has taken subs and then dropped them. Truck’s heart has a gash in it, torn by his Eric’s combat death. Can these two find a way to bring Dom’s practices into Truck’s life of seeking the wind spirit within him? Nya and Erin answer that question in this masterful banquet of imagery and action.Five stars just isn't enough. If allowed, I'd rate it the whole Milky Way.

  • Pati
    2018-11-18 06:48

    Filled with oddly worded prose instead of English. So much so that it was hard to follow at times and had me wondering how they got from point a to point b. The story, what ever it is, if it exists at all, is lost somewhere underneath all that flowery mess.

  • Susan Laine
    2018-12-02 08:29

    4.5 stars. How to put this reading experience into words? This is definitely unlike any erotic romance I’ve read before. Took some getting used to—but it was well worth it.To start with, there’s an amazing lyrical quality to the writing style that is impossible to miss. In the capable hands of Ms. O’Quinn and Ms. Rawlyns, the English language becomes a thing of beauty. However, in the first part of the book there’s an info dump about the backgrounds of Truckee and Dom. By then, I was anxiously waiting for the story to start. Still, with patience, this wait didn’t take much out of the story. Just a point to note.Also, what we have here is what I like to call “the soul connection“. A common trope in romance novels. Two (or more) people meet, and without speaking much at all, there’s a powerful instinctive bond. Let’s call it fate, shall we, or true love. Truckee is a reserved man and Dom is surly, so they don’t talk much. At all. And yet… they are instant soul mates. Now, don’t get me wrong. There’s a purpose to this approach. Both men are truly alone. I mean loneliness with a capital L. And, as is said in the story, it’s not so much what they say than what’s between the pauses, hidden yet visible if you stop to look. Truckee and Dom need and want each other, but both are broken and been burned before, so they almost take too long to come to terms with their feelings, let alone admitting them to one another. The L word is the hardest to say, apparently.To help mediate their unspoken mentalities, we have BDSM. Reluctant Truckee has no experience with this, and Dom’s used to being, well, the dominant one in casual one-nighters that serve no purpose. Only… that’s not the role Dom wishes to undertake, and Truckee is in for a learning curve, offering a touch of discipline to tame the cocky Dom, to transform their climaxes from good to ecstatic. Every scene between these two men is ripe with immense sexual tension. Every look, every held-back word, every gesture is a sign of what they both want, yet are unable to express. It’s kind of funny, really, that what they cannot say is given to us, the readers, with eloquent and poetic language that takes our breath away, transporting us to another world. In fact, if there’s one thing about this story that makes it stand apart from the rest of this genre, it’s immersion. The evocative writing pulled me in, and left me disoriented when I stopped reading and had to go back to the real world.Now, after all that gushing, here’s a few drawbacks. Sometimes I was left a little confused as to what was happening. Let me explain. I couldn’t always tell where the guys were in relation to each other, or turned to what direction, or where in the room they were. That sounds weird, I know, but because of the highly descriptive language that focused on emotional turmoil and inner workings I couldn’t get a handle on the tangible world, so to speak. It was like the spatial relations were a bit wonky. That is, however, no reason to not read this. After all, perhaps it was just me. We all have differing reading experiences.For a short story, we get amazing insight into Truckee and Dom. Truckee’s Indian heritage is intriguing, and Dom’s job provides the suspenseful action in the story. In fact, while the first part of the story is character-driven, the action sequences are stark and harsh, blood and danger of death awfully real and scary. In comparison, the sensual and sexual scenes are potent in every sense of the word. The energy between the two men is all but frightening with its magnitude, so compelling and erotic it cannot be ignored or dismissed. I relished every moment.In the end, this is a unique piece of writing, I have to say. I believe the feel of this book will remain with me for quite a while. There’s an almost tardiness to the storytelling, a slow build of a true connection that grew beyond dialogue. No words needed.Highly recommended.

  • Alex Akira
    2018-11-19 10:28

    This wonderful story, which reads like a lovesong of understanding, angst and joy, spun me on my tail and then some. The language is like fine liquor on the tongue if you are a drinker, the sweetest of desserts if you are a foodie. Whatever your passion, I’m sure you will find it within these pages, for this is a story of passion and soul and the trust it takes to find and hold both. It is a simple tale of man meeting mate, but often the simple appears complex until you unlock it and Erin O’Quinn and Nya Rawlyns supply a most exquisite key. Dominic Majors is a loner, a bit of a control addict, and fiercely protective of his ideals, which center on tracking and protecting Mother Nature from those who tend to harm her. He’s a federal specialist researcher in the employment of the US Field and Wildlife services and he goes where he is needed to accomplish his job. After recuperating from an “incident” at his last designation, he’s been assigned to Nevada to check out the big horn sheep population, seems there might be some poaching going down. Loath to admit it, he’s seething, spoiling for a fight even. The combination of the “incident” plus the loss of his young lover, to the opposing team no less, is messing with his mind and has him shoring up his argument that he doesn’t need anyone. He’s on the long, dusty trail to his destination venting and fantasizing about quitting and becoming a mountain man when he spots an odd hitchhiker whose mood seems to match his own.Paiute Indian, Truckee, is en route to see his cousin, through the courtesy of strangers; or those drivers who are willing to pick up a six-foot-three hitchhiker dressed in a black suit and a red bandana. While the journey, not the destination, is generally the thing to Truckee, his time between rides on the hot, dusty road is giving his mind over to playing with memories best laid to rest. Dreams like, what if his one and only lover hadn’t been killed in Iraq five years earlier? And hell, could he call the man a lover given the too few/too fast encounters between the two of them? No, the past is best left in the past, he should focus on his present, on his fell-into-his-lap source of income, the selling of his poetry and sketches; the beauty of the wilderness of nature that he pens. When a ride finally stops, Truckee climbs in, and both men discover you are truly only as alone as you want to be.I cannot possibly hope to do justice to the beauty that is this story. Should I say I am a Native American who doesn’t particularly like reading stories with Native Americans in them? Should I say I generally like my heroes younger than the thirty-eight of these leads? Dare I say I’m an arrogant loner myself, so yeah, not particular to stories of like ilk. I could say all of that, but what I’ll say instead is that the story had me by the fifth paragraph and wouldn’t let me go. This is a riveting, sensual journey into the hearts of two strong-willed, unforgiving men, who find support in facing their own fears, desires, and realities, by finding each other. Is it hot? Damn sure is… Hot, steamy, provocative, and brilliantly original. I felt for these men, I yearned when they yearned, I ached when they ached, and I even cried…for the beauty of choice words strung together to form evocative imagery and feeling. I hesitate to say this, but for me, this is the book Brokeback Mountain should have been.Thank you, Erin O’Quinn and Nya Rawlyns, for this rare and superb story of two fractured men becoming one whole soul. “Sensual, Provocative, Raw, Beauty”NOTE: This book was provided by the author for the purpose of a review on Rainbow Book Reviews.

  • Becky Condit
    2018-12-07 08:55

    Please leave comments on Madam Aus's 4 sweet pea review at http://mrsconditreadsbooks.com/index....If he’d been the romantic sort, and they’d been near any kind of civilization, he might have sprung for flowers. Or a vitamin B-12 shot.OK this book left me feeling a bit punch drunk. I did like it, I liked Dom and Truck, I was invested in their well being and their HEA so I connected on some level, but even with that, I don’t think I really got to know them that well, not really and not until towards the end. I think part of this was the book is a study in verbosity. It was like going to a museum to see coal drawings and instead being bombarded by many multi-layered Monet’s. Both are stunning in their own right but they ARE different.This book was beautifully done, although sometimes the language and prose was overwhelming, which I feel was what we sacrificed, in no small way, getting to know the men for. Even with the layers of prose the story line for the most part flowed properly although the rushing of some of the smaller plot points could have been handled less carelessly. But the development of Truckee and Dominic’s relationship flowed beautifully and the way they just seemlessly fit is truly worth it the read.I realised very fast that their sex scenes were very there and in the moment, and geting lost in the picture that was being painted by Nya Rawlins and Erin O’Quinn, did lend itself to a slower sensual burn, rather than an explosive sexual fire. These two men were in the right time and space for each other, the only problem being neither talked much… at all…. so of course we had a whole misconception plotline underneath the “real life” catch the badguys one.The book truly hit its stride in the second half and I did thoroughly enjoy reading it. There is another in the Wilderness Trail series by these two authors, which I will get and read because they intrigued me with their different writing style and strong and silent MC’s. It makes for interesting plotlines and developing relationships.

  • DL
    2018-11-19 10:37

    Much of the language had me rolling my eyes, it just tried so Hard to be poetical. Sometimes it worked, sometimes it was just too over the top. But I liked the book anyway, despite or because. I don't know. It was intense that is for sure. Even if all the sex scenes were left out, it would still be intense. The little sex twist, didn't make sense to me but whatever.

  • JR
    2018-11-27 05:44

    not finished may pick up later

  • Avril
    2018-12-11 02:48

    Wow. So good.

  • Erin O'Quinn
    2018-12-02 10:47