Read It's About Time: From Calendars and Clocks to Moon Cycles and Light Years - A History by Liz Evers Online

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Beautifully packaged, this book examines the people and places behind time's inventions, as well as reveals oodles of quirky facts related to timekeepingFrom the ice-age recordings of moon cycles and the earliest calendars, to modern wristwatches and quantum clocks, time and its effects have always enthralled mankind. People have spent centuries developing new ways of measBeautifully packaged, this book examines the people and places behind time's inventions, as well as reveals oodles of quirky facts related to timekeepingFrom the ice-age recordings of moon cycles and the earliest calendars, to modern wristwatches and quantum clocks, time and its effects have always enthralled mankind. People have spent centuries developing new ways of measuring time, describing it and quantifying it, and such methods have given rise to some of the most technically and aesthetically beautiful devices ever invented. This book is a tribute to timekeeping in its many forms and takes in the most significant creations as well as countless time trivia. Peppered with time-related anecdotes and quotes, this is an essential handbook for anyone fascinated by the fourth dimension....

Title : It's About Time: From Calendars and Clocks to Moon Cycles and Light Years - A History
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781782430674
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

It's About Time: From Calendars and Clocks to Moon Cycles and Light Years - A History Reviews

  • Mikeh5972
    2018-10-15 14:43

    The book contains much factual and interesting material about concepts of time and how it is measured. Overall it was a bit too superficial.

  • David
    2018-09-29 18:21

    Very little of interest, unless, perhaps, you are about 12 years old

  • Russell
    2018-09-26 16:22

    Light-weight, occasionally interesting, but generally an unsatisfying read. The book began well, with an engaging overview of the history of timekeeping, but the author essentially shoots herself in the foot by declaring, after a few chapters, that she isn't a scientist, and that technical explanations are beyond her. Had the author explained that "further technical explanations are beyond the scope of this book," it might have sustained some credibility. However, for me, it was like declaring that the author was only interested in curiosities, and though I read to the end of the book, this tip-off was enough to make me notice the frequent errors and over-simplifications. One of the more annoying aspects was that only the northern hemisphere view was covered, with no acknowledgement that seasons and weather patterns are slightly different in places other than North America.

  • Paul
    2018-09-27 19:44

    Evers has brought together a series of stories, facts and anecdotes all linked by the common theme of time. From the ancient methods of recording the passing of time with structures such as Stonehenge she brings us right up to date with atomic and quantum clocks. There are some interesting bits in here, particularly the tales about individuals who have made or invented timepieces. But, it falls flat in lots of ways. She declares that she is not technical at all, just before going onto write about some highly complex things, and there is an awful lot of blank space in here as some facts are on a single page with a fancy border.More 1.5 stars, bit disappointing really.

  • Cara
    2018-10-19 11:39

    Way more basic than expected. Could have saved time and money just browsing the wikipedia pages of "calendars," "clocks," "moon cycles," and "light years." The narrative voice is mildly entertaining, but almost anti-intellectual - on multiple occasions, an expression akin to "this kind of thing is over my head, so this is all I'm going to say about it," which was pretty disappointing. As if an initial interest in a genuinely fascinating topic then turned out to be too much work to research/understand and so was abandoned and glossed over.

  • Darcie
    2018-10-01 18:30

    A disappointing read. It was certainly quick, but just as things were getting interesting in a topic, she drops it and moves on to something else. As others have stated, her declaration of "not being a scientist" really turned me off. You don't have to be a scientist to educate yourself on the topics you are writing an entire book about. I was excited to read this as I love learning new things about time, but this just left me hanging.

  • William Schram
    2018-10-23 16:33

    This book was interesting, but it wasn't superlative or amazing or anything. It contains little tidbits and factoids about time and how we measure it. Since time is a pretty wide ranging subject it also includes stuff on fictional time travelers and geological time scales and other such things.The book is a quick read, and won't take long to digest. Most of the information is introduced in chunks that are easily taken in.

  • Anne Dunham
    2018-10-11 14:23

    This provided a thorough-going chronicle of time, in all it's dimensions. A fact-filled book that helped me know many things about how we have come to view the universe. I learned much and had my mind trying to grasp ideas I had never thought of before. It is not hard to read and provides much food for thought. Anyone could glean a lot of new ideas from this book.