Read The Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (Great Courses, #8190) by Robert I. Weiner Online

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History at its most interesting is complex, a fascinating whirl of events, personalities, and forces, and few periods of history offer us such captivating complexity as Europe's 19th "century"—the often-broadly defined period from the French Revolution to World War I that formed the foundation of the modern world.How was that foundation built? And what did that transition History at its most interesting is complex, a fascinating whirl of events, personalities, and forces, and few periods of history offer us such captivating complexity as Europe's 19th "century"—the often-broadly defined period from the French Revolution to World War I that formed the foundation of the modern world.How was that foundation built? And what did that transition to modernity mean for peasants, workers, the middle class, aristocrats, women, and minorities?Why did an era that began with the idealism of the French Revolution and the power of the Industrial Revolution culminate in the chaos of World War I, considered by most historians to be the greatest tragedy of modern European history? Did nationalism and imperialism inevitably lead in such a direction, or were there other factors involved?Even these questions, as important as they are, can only hint at the complexity of this period, just as this course can really only put us on a path toward the answers....

Title : The Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (Great Courses, #8190)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9791565859936
Format Type : Audio Cassette
Number of Pages : 0 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Long 19th Century: European History from 1789 to 1917 (Great Courses, #8190) Reviews

  • Bevan
    2019-01-25 10:13

    Robert Weiner provides a thought provoking overview of this fascinating period. I've listened to it twice now and will again. Each lecture is packed with ideas. He adopts more of an interpretive approach rather than just reciting events although he does provide the context necessary. I also appreciated the excellent notes and recommendations for further reading. There is a noticeable emphasise on diplomatic history but other aspects are covered. My only minor criticism is that his vocal volume tends to go up and down a wee bit too much, although I was still able to hear everything. Excellent and I hope the Great Courses release a version of his course on the twentieth century.

  • Ilinca
    2019-02-05 18:26

    I think the four stars are more because of how interesting and complex the topic is, rather than for the actual analysis. I feel I know a bit more, indeed, and it's hard to make sense of such a complex set of circumstances all over the place. I could have done without the side remarks (no, I'm not impressed at Prof. Weiner's having spent New Year's Eve in Berlin once, or by how he and his wife once saw a rally in Paris. Seriously?) and without the over-emphasizing of half the words in a sentence and without him telling us how professional the people at the TC are. I guess I'm more of a barebones kind of reader.

  • Sean Leas
    2019-02-07 14:09

    This is one of the more enjoyable Great Courses that I’ve partook with. And I have a nice stack of books on my TBR to fill in the gaps.

  • Void lon iXaarii
    2019-02-23 16:05

    I started this course with great excitement, due to the teacher's great passion, oratorical skill and knowledge and the growing realization of just what a huge treasure of events and lessons unknown to me lie in that century. Unfortunately as the course went on I got more and more the feeling that this course suffers from the curse of most historians: a tendency to glorify or at least obsess about individuals & their morals (be it kings, generals or politicians), centralized governments & their monuments, battles and dates, all while being moralistic and using retroactive/retrospective logic (as opposed to logical analysis of incentives and means). This results in many long preaching sermons and not internally coherent positions. For example on the one hand the author condemns a lot of the actions of states/governments which have resulted in deaths, on the other he wishes they had done more with a socialistic & pro state-can-do-everything view of the world. I guess ever since I read the kind of history books like T.Sowell's "Migrations and Cultures" I've been spoiled and my standards have been raised of history books/course to also make logical arguments and theories and to sustain them with coherent research and comparative studies. For example both in that book and this course the issue of the persecution and treatment of Jewish people comes up, but where as in that book there was a reasonable theory offering some explanation as to reasons of behaviors of native populations as well as comparison's with similar treatments of other minorities in this course the line of reasoning seemed to me to be quite confused (a lot of talk about darwinism/evolution theory as causality seems to me unsatisfactory as an explanation). Anyway, I got off topic... just meant to say I encountered for me too much soft logic explanations in this course to be able to give it a higher score despite how fascinating I find the historical subject matter, how skilled a speaker the author is and what interesting events he relates.Still, I'm quite happy about this course because even though i might disagree with some of the positions took by the author, it awakened in me an even bigger thirst to dig deeper into the 19th and 18th centuries and provided me with a lot of anchor points and perspectives I didn't know of before.

  • Charlene
    2019-01-24 13:23

    This is the first Teaching Company product that I've been through . . . it was longer than I expected but very interesting. I thought it covered the material very well & I enjoyed the personal stories that the professor included as well as comments about recommended books to read, historians with different opinions about the events, etc. I tried to read the lecture notes after watching each 30 minute lecture to make sure I understood the main points.

  • Tom
    2019-02-08 17:10

    While a fine scholar, I suppose, and a very able communicator, Weiner's political correctness to me cripples his study. Instead of judging the period he discusses through their eyes and values, he stumbled badly by using a 21st Century filter which is both distracting, and to some extant, inaccurate. A less studied reader/listener might accept his opinions without a jaundiced eye. Objectivity is the first demand of the historian.

  • Mjmiyargmail.com
    2019-02-18 17:28

    A tour de force! I knew this history pretty well, but Professor Weiner's insights and his recurring habit of introducing the most eminent historians for every given moment, kept my head turning and going, Oh wow! ... that makes sense. I highly recommend this course.

  • Shannon
    2019-02-02 10:15

    Excessive pauses and emphases in the lectures made it difficult to listen to.