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Design for the Real World has, since its first appearance twenty-five years ago, become a classic. Translated into twenty-three languages, it is one of the world's most widely read books on design. In this edition, Victor Papanek examines the attempts by designers to combat the tawdry, the unsafe, the frivolous, the useless product, once again providing a blueprint for senDesign for the Real World has, since its first appearance twenty-five years ago, become a classic. Translated into twenty-three languages, it is one of the world's most widely read books on design. In this edition, Victor Papanek examines the attempts by designers to combat the tawdry, the unsafe, the frivolous, the useless product, once again providing a blueprint for sensible, responsible design in this world which is deficient in resources and energy....

Title : Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change
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ISBN : 9780897331531
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 416 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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Design for the Real World: Human Ecology and Social Change Reviews

  • John
    2019-01-15 04:17

    What are we to make of the fact that this book, itself a designed object, written with the methodological assistance of a flow chart process, with a direct intention to fill in a clear gap in socially-aware industrial design, is a mess with abrupt shifts in topic and sudden returns to a well-worn discussions? Wouldn't such a presentation engender the criticism that presenting something so clearly important to the writer in such a way lead to undermining that very content with the dismissal that it is the product of sloppy thinking, or is this concern a fallacy that fails to address the facts of the book?There are a lot of good things in this book, from critical facts about important problems to any number of design projects with the potential to do real good. There are even a few helpful techniques and methodological suggestions. The reader is given a certain kind of compendium or reference interesting developments, say in bionic (or, in our language, biomimickry) approaches and promises. However, while each paragraph presents its point with clarity and forcefulness, there is no usable infrastructure behind the ideas of this book, itself retaining the form of decades-long brainstorming session. To be fair, I may be placing the reading demands of a certain time, place, or culture upon the book. In some ways, a current design education inherits the positive legacy of this book without the negative, able to unabashedly work on social problems with the kind of presentation we now expect. Yet, I wonder if we've also inherited the negative tradition, letting a certain bite, vigor, or passion substitute for a synthesis that actually synthesizes. The error of presenting the raw functionality, but not the form or empathy that really allows people to use it, though heartily complained of, is to my mind what this book eventually suffers.

  • Mieczyslaw Kasprzyk
    2019-01-06 21:17

    This book changed the way I taught design.

  • Matt McLean
    2019-01-01 22:13

    There are some excellent insights in this book, especially regarding the power of and need for collaborative, multi-disciplinary teams to solve design problems facing the world, but I found Victor's tone a bit combative and I didn't particularly enjoy slogging through an excess of examples of poor design. Even so, I found myself agreeing with him wholeheartedly regarding the role of education in the lives of young designers, as well as the missive to avoid specialization.The book is a product of its time (1971), which makes it feel dated, but Papanek's call for designers to be world citizens and always mindful of the useful contributions of their work is timeless.

  • Vasilis
    2019-01-18 22:36

    Brilliant. It will change my teaching practice fundamentally.

  • Lee Ann
    2019-01-21 04:23

    Very bold thesis statement! Designers have a strong professional and even moral obligation to create items that are functional, aesthetic and well made (points for ecological sensitivity, too). They should not contribute to mindless consumerism through overbuilding or churning out endless variations of the same essential product. Wonderful sentiments indeed.

  • Andrew Tatge
    2019-01-02 03:27

    Thought provoking and often impassioned but chapters can meander. The main thread of a chapter can get lost amid examples, asides etc. and finishing individual chapters was daunting because material seemed arbitrary at times. Many chapters, however, have snappy attacks on design/industrial design; every now and then there are great frameworks or explanations about design values that might stick with you long after reading. Most of the ideas here are surprisingly prescient and jive well with humanist/humanitarian/life affirming design. The argument for designing for impoverished or under-advantages groups is repeatedly made in a wide range of examples and ways, but the underlying defense of this perspective is underdeveloped and frequently iterated. If you have drunk the kool-aid like I have, it can get a bit didactic but still leave a big impression. If your values don't line up with this worldview, Papanek's at times confrontational tone will put you on the defensive rather than persuade. Then again, perhaps his matter of fact outrage is something we could use more of, and as an intelligent call to action for those in the field, the book succeeds in that regard. What designers should do as professionals can seem daunting and difficult to reconcile with our workaday lives, but as designers that is, perhaps, exactly what we should be tackling. A final note: being written in 1984, there's some interesting, non-politically correct language when it comes to how Papanek refers to the mentally handicapped, developing nations, etc. . This is all acknowledged in the foreword, and I appreciate both the warning and leaving the flawed language as an indication of the times. Even with the best of intentions and liberalist worldview, the book is a product of it's era, as we all are products of our own. I'm sure I'll read this review one day and cringe at the terms I chose for this paragraph. Even so, it was sometimes jarring.

  • Shreyas
    2019-01-03 03:17

    Very enlightening design book. This book covers the very fundamental of design, as to what design should do and what roads it could pave. You are reminded of the intensely wielding power that industrial design possesses. A quote that has struck me still, after reading this book, is that unlike other fields, designers try to create new problems so that they could construct their own elegant solution towards it.This reminds me of the fingerprint lock for mobile phones. Nobody actually wanted fingerprint locks for mobile phones when they had number digit locks, there was no necessity, however, a need for this feature was created.The book continues along this line and explores a wide range of topics. I have noted down several ideas from this book from which I could continue to make meaningful product design ideas. He also covers topics from bionics and biomimetics, which needs to pondered upon more deeply. I am planning to read it again hopefully.

  • Shawna
    2019-01-23 01:23

    This is a must-read, not just for designers, but for anyone in a creative field. A call for ethics and pride of what you put out in the world. Something I've always admired about science (wrestling with responsibility), but hadn't seen in my field. Well, here it is.The only drawback is that it was last updated in the 80s and so doesn't talk specifically about web design (focused more on physical product design). If anyone knows of a good "updated" design book that talks about human ecology and social change for design in the internet age I'd love to hear about it.

  • James Eckman
    2019-01-01 05:20

    If you want to design products, this book is a five. It's a bit dated in spots, but the author is dead so updates are tough. Many of the same issues still face us, crappy, wasteful buildings, poorly planned urban areas and shoddy consumer products along with the corporate apologists for this mess. Includes how to design thoughts and methods as well as old news.

  • Nick DeMarco
    2019-01-13 21:19

    This is the book that sent me to design school. The first page is a deadly attack on industrial design as the worst profession in the world (second only to advertising). The rest of the book is filled with hope for the potentials that design can have in shaping the world in new, positive, directions.

  • Barbara Emanuel
    2019-01-10 02:34

    "first-world" designers teaching poor "third-world" designers how to think/design... good luck to the "first-world" people who read this book and believe this is the current design reality in the world...

  • Sherry Wu
    2019-01-06 02:37

    “Having experienced real design work, the designer will forever after feel a little ashamed when he designs a pretty, sexy toaster.” ——Victor Papanek, Design for the Real WorldDesign for the Real World is one of the world’s most widely read books on design. In this book, Victor Papanek denounced marketing-driven design (e.g. obsolescence) and exposed a set of issues by irresponsible design - tawdry, frivolous, useless, unsafe, waste, pollution.In the 2nd half of the book, he claimed that design should be Integrated. Design must focus on human and humane factors. Design must place the problem in its social perspective. Design must consider social groups, classes and societies. A designer should be a generalist instead of a specialist.Additionally, he discussed innovation thinking and advocated that a design team should be cross-functional to attempt Integrated Design. This could be viewed as the origin of Design Thinking.After all, design must be social and moral responsible.

  • Christopher Nilssen
    2019-01-15 22:08

    A kind of terrifying read once you get through it and realize that, while some things have improved, many of the most toxic elements that Papanek rails against have gotten significantly worse.One of the recommended reads for “Human-Computer Interaction”, though would be worthwhile for any designer to at least leaf through.In the end, the utopian ideal of designers being able to refuse work they found morally objectionable is a good one, but like most utopian ideals lives much more easily in dreams than reality.

  • Jacquie Shaw
    2018-12-30 21:19

    The whole time reading this book I kept wondering why it hadn't been presented to me during my time at design school. This is a fantastic read that touches on ethical and inclusive design. Though written in the 70's I found so much of Papanek's criticism of the practice of design still — very much unfortunately — relevant. Though some language I found was outdated in parts (I did though read an older edition I found in a second hand store)

  • Farhodjon
    2019-01-02 01:28

    Очень длинная книга для не-дизайнера. Но, для дизайнеров книга важная, т.к. дизайнерская этика не ограничивается только рисованием интерфейсов или графиков. Важность понять вещей и людей шире очень хорошо передается в книге.http://dmitriikuchev.ru/blog/all/desi...

  • Kate Belobrova
    2019-01-04 22:36

    Strong and evolutionary ideas, but the examples are quite too long and vapid. Their description distract from the main course of the book.

  • Ivan
    2019-01-19 00:08

    Великолепная книга. Несмотря на несколько устаревшие факты на которые ссылается автор, книга крайне актуальна и сейчас. Однозначно must read.

  • Iron Ic
    2018-12-24 22:34

    perfect book to show social responsibility aspect of designa lot of to think of

  • Ola Loobeensky
    2019-01-20 21:37

    BUM!"Zgodnie z oświadczeniem rzecznika z Detroit z 1971 roku przedni zderzak, który działałby przy prędkości 15 km/h, podwyższyłby cenę każdego samochodu o 500 dolarów i, co jest jeszcze bardziej zniechęcające, jego opracowanie miałoby potrwać od trzech do pięciu lat. By wykazać fałszywość tego twierdzenia skorzystałem z dwóch półek na książki o szerokości 30cm i długości 215cm. Między półkami umieściłem blisko osiemdziesiąt pustych puszek po piwie, tworząc coś w rodzaju ogromnego sandwicza w którym półki zastąpiły chleb, a puszki po piwie – pastrami. Przymocowałem puszki do półek, a potem całe to błazeńskie ustrojstwo do przedniego zderzaka mojego samochodu, po czym z prędkością 20km/h wjechałem w narożnik siedziby senatu."Facetem, który to wszystko zrobił był Viktor Papanek.Lektura „Dizajnu dla realnego świata” wprowadziła mnie w stan przekraczającego wszelkie granice entuzjazmu i po prawdzie nie mam zupełnie nastroju do konstruowania zwykłych zdań, o nie. Wydobywałabym z siebie najchętniej różne wykrzykniki typu: Ojej! Ach! O rany! Obawiam się jednak, że niewiele by one powiedziały ewentualnym zainteresowanym, a i sceptyków pozostawiły obojętnymi (czego bardzo nie chcę), w związku z czym oto konkrety.Na 360 stronach* książki zmieścił się cały ładunek papankowej bezpretensjonalności, multum prostych recept na trudne problemy, nowatorskich metod wspomagających twórcze myślenie i opowieści o różnych rodzajach utrudniających pracę dizajnera blokad. Ale to nie wszystko. Żadna pozycja o projektowaniu nie mogłaby się obyć bez pozytywnych przykładów, a tych w „Dizajnie” jest bardzo wiele. Zachwycające fotele relaksacyjne dla tancerzy, krzesła z podłużnym otworem w miejscu, w którym zwykle lądują nasze kręgosłupy, dzięki czemu ciężar ciała opiera się na miękkiej tkance tłuszczowej pleców, nie ugniatając wystających kręgów (pomyślcie o nich ciepło, wiercąc się na plastikowych siedzeniach komunikacji zbiorowej), napędzane siłą mięśni pojazdy, przeznaczone dla krajów Trzeciego Świata – nieawaryjne, nadające się do transportu rannych, towarów, do łączenia w łańcuchy, do względnie łatwego pokonywania wzniesień nawet przy pełnym obciążeniu. Można by wymieniać bez końca. Człowiek o tak wielkim poczuciu humoru, jak Victor Papanek, nie mógł jednak zostawić wszystkich tych tanich i solidnych rozwiązań bez złośliwego komentarza – znajdujemy się przecież w kapitalistycznej Ameryce. Otóż i komentarz: wycięta z gazety reklama podgrzewanego podnóżka w stylu królowej Anny, do tego oferta sprzedaży plastikowej dziewczyny, przypominającej nieco znane nam dmuchane lale. Przemierzając tekst książki natknąć się można na kolejne absurdalne przedmioty, a poza tym poczytać o trudnościach, piętrzonych przed Autorem, gdy ten usiłował spopularyzować odpowiedzialny społecznie i ekologicznie dizajn w miejsce bezsensownego projektowania opartego na chęci zysku. Papanek bez przerwy wyraża swój absolutny brak tolerancji dla rynku głuchego na realne potrzeby, traktującego ludzi jak małpy, którym w cenie złota wcisnąć można dowolną ilość tombaku. Nie ma miejsca na nonszalanckie zużywanie zasobów, na brak troski o środowisko, na niewłaściwą utylizację odpadów, na rzeczy źle pomyślane. Brzmi to bardzo współcześnie, prawda?A teraz niespodzianka: „Dizajn” pisany był w latach 1963-70, na półki sklepowe trafił zaś w 1971. Mało tego – za datą wydania przemawiają właściwie tylko jakość fotografii i fryzury modeli oraz modelek, pojawiających się na niektórych ilustracjach. Skala pionierstwa Amerykanina jest porażająca; ta książka to bomba i nie wyobrażam sobie, by kiedykolwiek miała przestać wybuchać.Przykre jest dla mnie wracanie myślą do przełomu lat 60. i 70., kiedy Design For the Real World odrzucali kolejni wydawcy, tłumacząc decyzję stosowaniem przez autora pojęć tak mało znanych, jak ekologia, etologia, czy Trzeci Świat.I śmieszno, i straszno._______________________________*Trochę kłamię, ponieważ 35 wieńczących dzieło kartek to odautorska bibliografia oraz indeks. Ale co tam.

  • Ola Loobeensky
    2018-12-28 23:23

    BUM! "Zgodnie z oświadczeniem rzecznika z Detroit z 1971 roku przedni zderzak, który działałby przy prędkości 15 km/h, podwyższyłby cenę każdego samochodu o 500 dolarów i, co jest jeszcze bardziej zniechęcające, jego opracowanie miałoby potrwać od trzech do pięciu lat. By wykazać fałszywość tego twierdzenia skorzystałem z dwóch półek na książki o szerokości 30cm i długości 215cm. Między półkami umieściłem blisko osiemdziesiąt pustych puszek po piwie, tworząc coś w rodzaju ogromnego sandwicza w którym półki zastąpiły chleb, a puszki po piwie – pastrami. Przymocowałem puszki do półek, a potem całe to błazeńskie ustrojstwo do przedniego zderzaka mojego samochodu, po czym z prędkością 20km/h wjechałem w narożnik siedziby senatu."Facetem, który to wszystko zrobił był Viktor Papanek.Lektura „Dizajnu dla realnego świata” wprowadziła mnie w stan przekraczającego wszelkie granice entuzjazmu i po prawdzie nie mam zupełnie nastroju do konstruowania zwykłych zdań, o nie. Wydobywałabym z siebie najchętniej różne wykrzykniki typu: Ojej! Ach! O rany! Obawiam się jednak, że niewiele by one powiedziały ewentualnym zainteresowanym, a i sceptyków pozostawiły obojętnymi (czego bardzo nie chcę), w związku z czym oto konkrety.Na 360 stronach* książki zmieścił się cały ładunek papankowej bezpretensjonalności, multum prostych recept na trudne problemy, nowatorskich metod wspomagających twórcze myślenie i opowieści o różnych rodzajach utrudniających pracę dizajnera blokad. Ale to nie wszystko. Żadna książka o projektowaniu nie mogłaby się obyć bez pozytywnych przykładów, a tych w „Dizajnie” jest bardzo wiele. Zachwycające fotele relaksacyjne dla tancerzy, krzesła z podłużnym otworem w miejscu, w którym zwykle lądują nasze kręgosłupy, dzięki czemu ciężar ciała opiera się na miękkiej tkance tłuszczowej pleców, nie ugniatając wystających kręgów (pomyślcie o nich ciepło, wiercąc się na plastikowych siedzeniach komunikacji zbiorowej), napędzane siłą mięśni pojazdy, przeznaczone dla krajów Trzeciego Świata – nieawaryjne, nadające się do transportu rannych, towarów, do łączenia w łańcuchy, do względnie łatwego pokonywania wzniesień nawet przy pełnym obciążeniu. Można by wymieniać bez końca. Człowiek o tak wielkim poczuciu humoru, jak Victor Papanek, nie mógł jednak zostawić wszystkich tych tanich i solidnych rozwiązań bez złośliwego komentarza – znajdujemy się przecież w kapitalistycznej Ameryce. Otóż i komentarz: wycięta z gazety reklama podgrzewanego podnóżka w stylu królowej Anny, do tego oferta sprzedaży plastikowej dziewczyny, przypominającej nieco znane nam dmuchane lale. Przemierzając tekst książki natknąć się można na kolejne absurdalne przedmioty, a poza tym poczytać o trudnościach, piętrzonych przed Autorem, gdy ten usiłował spopularyzować odpowiedzialny społecznie i ekologicznie dizajn w miejsce bezsensownego projektowania opartego na chęci zysku. Papanek bez przerwy wyraża swój absolutny brak tolerancji dla rynku głuchego na realne potrzeby, traktującego ludzi jak małpy, którym w cenie złota wcisnąć można dowolną ilość tombaku. Nie ma miejsca na nonszalanckie zużywanie zasobów, na brak troski o środowisko, na niewłaściwą utylizację odpadów, na rzeczy źle pomyślane. Brzmi to bardzo współcześnie, prawda?A teraz niespodzianka: „Dizajn” pisany był w latach 1963-70, na półki sklepowe trafił zaś w 1971. Mało tego – za datą wydania przemawiają właściwie tylko jakość fotografii i fryzury modeli oraz modelek, pojawiających się na niektórych ilustracjach. Skala pionierstwa Amerykanina jest porażająca; ta książka to bomba i nie wyobrażam sobie, by kiedykolwiek miała przestać wybuchać.Przykre jest dla mnie wracanie myślą do przełomu lat 60. i 70., kiedy "Design For the Real World" odrzucali kolejni wydawcy, tłumacząc decyzję stosowaniem przez autora pojęć tak mało znanych, jak ekologia, etologia, czy Trzeci Świat.I śmieszno, i straszno.__________________________*Trochę kłamię, ponieważ 35 wieńczących dzieło kartek to odautorska bibliografia oraz indeks. Ale co tam.

  • Donovan Richards
    2019-01-13 01:13

    The Many Hues of Charity It’s very easy to become caught in the notion of charity equaling money. We see disasters on television and nothing seems easier than a monetary contribution from the friendly confines of our couch. Some, however, choose to dive deeper. They see a need in the community and they volunteer outside of work hours. Could we go farther? Is there a way to use your time on the clock to help those in need? A divergent thinker, Papanek’s Design for the Real World peregrinates through a myriad of topics over the course of its 300+ pages. But in particular, I found his thoughts on work as charity intriguing. The Meaning of Design For starters, let’s get on the same page regarding the meaning of design. Living in the midst of the Internet era, one might confuse design with web development—the act of creating a website. Yes, design can take the form of building a website. But it’s much bigger. Others might consider design through the lens of logos and typography. While design plays a part in producing these items, it’s more holistic. For Papenak, “Design is composing an epic poem, executing a mural, painting a masterpiece, writing a concerto. But design is also cleaning and reorganizing a desk drawer, pulling an impacted tooth, baking an apple pie, choosing sides for a back-lot baseball game, and educating a child” (3).In short, design is the act of creativity behind solving a problem. The Problems of the Design Industry Design can be a lucrative industry. The world is rife with problem solving opportunities. As designers continue to use their skills to create new products and solve increasingly complex issues, Papenak’s Design for the Real World represents a careful caution about reckless design-for-profits. Instead of designing products that last, designers create goods with designed obsolescence—one makes more money when customers continually repurchase the same items. Even more, most of the design industry caters to the highest classes. While 80% of the world struggles around the poverty line, designers work on the next product for the affluent. Papanek mourns this development: “Isn’t it too bad that so little design, so few products are really relevant to the needs of mankind” (51)?Working CharitablyPapenak argues for a charitable principle in the design world. Much like the Old Testament tenet of “gleanings”, Papenak suggests designers devote a portion of their time lending creativity and problem solving abilities to social and ecological issues.“Being designers, we don’t have to pay money in the form of kymmenykset or a tithe. Being designers, we can pay by giving 10 per cent of our crop of ideas and talents to the 75 per cent of mankind in need” (57).The entire world needs to experience the gift of design. Imagine the result if business in general and design in particular devoted 10 percent of its time to helping those in need. Whether by developing free systems to help lift people out of poverty or designing products cheaply and efficiently to assist those in need so they can spend time more wisely, the donation of time and intellectual capital can realistically change the world. Design for the Real World dives into many issues. But for me, the charitable giving of our time resonates. Our work is a gift. While some positions lend themselves better to financial charity or volunteer work, other jobs directly influence the way we live. It is well worth considering how we can be charitable with our work. Check out Design for the Real World.Originally published at http://www.wherepenmeetspaper.com

  • Charlie
    2018-12-27 23:17

    criticism at its best.why spend your time chrome plating when the underlying mechanism doesn't serve the need nearly as well as it should? Profit. Specializations designed around corporate profit have created a headless monster that no one who drives it can appreciate for what it is. Design should be the cross-disciplinary glue that radically improves upon thoughtless expansion and profit seeking.it's my opinion that the auto makers have been able to get away with light aesthetic changes to a fundamentally archaic foundation for far too long. finally an upstart, Tesla, has managed to break through, expose what's really possible, and force the established corporate zombie companies to make serious investments in core technology that doesn't poison the neighbors and opens the possibility for virtually zero emission living - while offering unprecedented fun, safety and economy. I could go on...

  • SooYoung
    2019-01-10 23:32

    More or less anyone entering engineering, graphic design, marketing etc should have to read this book. I was sold immediately when I read the preface, "Advertising design, in persuading people to buy thing they don't need, with money they don't have, in order to impress others who don't care, is probably the phoniest field in existence today."The book goes on to talk about how poorly and dangerously designed American cars are, how foreign models are grossly out-building us, and yet for various political reasons, American manufacturing does nothing about it. He talks about how items for the handicapped are often terribly designed, or worse yet, non-existent. Designers create for such a small demographic - white, middle class, 18-45 years old, with disposable income. He talks about fancy pens that sell for $150, yet only cost 39 cents. "Additionally, the tooling, advertising, marketing and even the materials used in the packaging represent such an exercise in futile waste-making that is not acceptable except to a pampered elite." It was eye opening in that it makes you realize how short-sighted design can be. And this book isn't focused only on America, he discusses throughout how we create and market items around the world, as imperialists and colonialists, as well as how other nations create and market within their own countries, and which is better.Truly a great book that everyone designer - in whatever field - must read.

  • Christopher Edwards
    2018-12-27 21:13

    "Turning back to education, we find that part of the philosophical and moral bankruptcy of many design schools and universities likes in the ever-increasing trend to train students to become narrowly vertical specialists, whereas the real need is for broad, horizontal generalists or synthesists." Reads Papanek's condemnation of both design and design education and his vision and prescription for an approach to "integrated design". Writing over 30 years ago, the fact that it is only now reaching any kind of higher level impact is startling. Perhaps we've reached peak capitalism, where designers and design educators are finally, truly tired of being the grease of the machine? Papanek can read like your grumpy conspiracy-minded uncle, especially when he seems to bat down any idea of frivolity. He's at his strongest, however, toward the end of the book where he is laying out a view of a new kind of practice and education. Well worth the read.

  • Ethan
    2019-01-08 22:36

    Calling this the "classic design bible" is no stretch of the imagination. Reading this after my first year of architecture school did, and continues to, strongly influence my thinking on design. I return to this book regularly, and cite it often. It contains some truly eye-opening information, and it is a shame that, despite its publication in over 20 languages, it has not had more of an influence on design and design education. Of course everyone has jumped on the William McDonough bandwagon, but Papanek is the true pioneer. Some of the prospects of this book are frightening, especially considering it was written 30 years ago. Besides its intellectual merit, the book includes Papanek's usual brand of witty, humorous writing. This book is a must, not just for designers, artists, and architects, but I think, for everyone. I feel so strongly about this book, that I gave it to four friends as a Christmas gift.

  • Chris Beiser
    2019-01-09 22:15

    A mixed bag: At his best, (towards the start of the book) the author has some great ideas about the responsibilities that designers have to change the world, and presents some fascinating ideas for how to do so. At his worst, he's failing to understand the economics of price discrimination, making ridiculous claims about manufacturing costs ("my students and I estimate that a television for production in Africa on a cottage basis could be done at a cost of just $30!"), promoting geodesic domes, and arguing that Robert McNamera's promotion of tail fins on cars can be linked to his continuation of atrocities in Vietnam, and that eduction, as it currently exists is a literal crime against humanity, as defined by the Nuremberg Code. His ideas about telesis is rock solid, but by the time you get to 'total design,' you may as well just close the book.

  • Pavel Moiseenko
    2019-01-22 05:26

    Папанек крут. Левый до мозга костей, годами жил и работал в странах третьего мира, разрабатывал дизайн повседневных вещей для инвалидов, неграмотных, детей, бедных, больных, много преподовал. Известен его радиоприемник для отдаленных районов Индии и Индонезии из жестяной банки, питающийся от горючего. Про то и книга, что дизайн должен быть социально отзывчивым и экологически ответственным.Папанек настоящий революционер. Со своей идеологией, теоретической базой и последователями.Книга сама по себе сделана приятно (издательство Дмитрия Аронова). Полный отзыв: http://pavelmoiseenko.ru/blog/dizajn-...

  • Kars
    2019-01-23 01:11

    Papanek likes to ramble. In the closing section of the book he says this is on purpose. He wants the reader to make their own connections. But it does make for hard going some times. I had trouble staying focused. However when Papanek slams the design profession for pandering to the moneymen, and when he passionately argues for integrated, comprehensive, socially responsible design I found myself cheering him on. This dedication to progressing design makes this book as relevant today as it was back when first published in 1971. A must-read.

  • Alice Cerconi
    2019-01-08 23:35

    Even if written in 1971, “Design for the real world” by Victor Papanek is still relevant today and probably will always be since it’s advocating responsible design in a world where the resources are getting poorer. He strongly believes that design must be used to shape the society in a positive way by improving the life quality of the ones in need. Anything that does not add functional value is considered by Victor Papanek as a perversion of design. A must-read for designers, but could add value to anyone interested in making this world a better place.

  • Claudia Yahany
    2019-01-01 03:18

    No entiendo por qué, en el 2015, los diseñadores no hemos sido capaces de transmitir el ejercicio de diseño de tal manera que transforme no sólo los productos que utilizamos sino la forma en que vivimos, nos relacionamos, aprendemos, construimos organizaciones y sobre todo somos RESPONSABLES de lo que hacemos.Tengo mucha tarea. Me gustan los libros que me dejan tarea. Lástima que éste tiene 44 años (y se le notan). Fuera de eso, hasta puedo aplaudir de pie.