Read Great Horror Stories: Tales by Stoker, Poe, Lovecraft and Others by John Grafton Mike Ashley Online

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"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." —H. P. LovecraftFans of horror and the supernatural will savor the dark delicacies in this spine-tingling anthology of the genre's very best. Featuring an international gallery of the world's great horror writers, this collection celebrates one of litera"The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown." —H. P. LovecraftFans of horror and the supernatural will savor the dark delicacies in this spine-tingling anthology of the genre's very best. Featuring an international gallery of the world's great horror writers, this collection celebrates one of literature's most popular forms of fiction with 14 masterfully crafted tales of terror, including:• Bram Stoker's Dracula's Guest• Edgar Allan Poe's The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar• H. P. Lovecraft's The Colour Out of Space• Arthur Machen's The White People• Izumi Kyoka's A Tale of Three Who Were Blind• Algernon Blackwood's The Willows• Ambrose Bierce's The Damned Thing...and 7 more chilling classics. A truly macabre must-have!...

Title : Great Horror Stories: Tales by Stoker, Poe, Lovecraft and Others
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ISBN : 9780486461434
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Great Horror Stories: Tales by Stoker, Poe, Lovecraft and Others Reviews

  • Jim
    2018-10-19 01:36

    This is a superb collection of short horror stories, most of which I have read (and enjoyed) before. They include as standbys as M. R. James's "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad"; Saki's "Shredni Vashtar"; W. W. Jacobs's much anthologized "The Monkey's Paw"; Algernon Blackwood's great "The Willows"; Bram Stoker's "Dracula's Guest"; Poe's "The Facts in the Case of M. Valdemar"; Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery"; and H. P. Lovecrafts eldritch "The Colour Out of Space." Even among the stories I had no read before, there are some I will remember.There are no tales of straightforward hauntings here. Rather, the evil comes from elementals and other inexplicable forces. The most classical of these is the Lovecraft, which tells of a meteor from outer space which led to strange lethal effects on the human, animal, and plant life in the area:The rural tales are queer. They might be even queerer if city men and college chemists could be interested enough to analyze the water from that disused well, or the grey dust that no wind seems to disperse. Botanists, too, ought to study the stunted flora on the borders of that spot, for they might shed light on the country notion that the blight is spreading—little by little, perhaps an inch a year. People say the color of the neighboring herbage is not quite right in the spring, and that wild things leave queer prints in the light winter snow. Snow never seems quite so heavy on the blasted heath as it is elsewhere. Horses—the few that are left in this motor age— grow skittish in the silent valley; and hunters cannot depend on their dogs too near the splotch of grayish dust.They say the mental influences are very bad, too; numbers went queer in the years after Nahum's taking, and always they lacked the power to get away. Then the stronger-minded folk all left the region, and only the foreigners tried to live in the crumbling old homesteads. They could not stay, though; and one sometimes wonders what insight beyond ours their wild, weird stories of whispered magic have given them. Their dreams at night, they protest, are very horrible in that grotesque country; and surely the very look of the dark realm is enough to stir a morbid fancy. No traveler has ever escaped a sense of strangeness in those deep ravines, and artists shiver as they paint thick woods whose mystery is as much of the spirits as of the eye. I myself am curious about the sensation I derived from my one lone walk before Ammi told me his tale. When twilight came I had vaguely wished some clouds would gather, for an odd timidity about the deep skyey voids above had crept into my soul.This collection is great for Halloween reading, like others published by Dover.

  • Brandi
    2018-10-18 08:39

    A good selection of horror stories. I had read a couple of them, which is not surprising for as many of these horror story anthologies as I have read, but most were new to me. There were a couple that started off a bit hard to follow due to the language used, but entertaining once I got into them. Overall, a solid collection of horror stories from top-notch writers.

  • Neil Davies
    2018-10-19 03:40

    Despite being almost put off reading the book by the snobbish and pompous introduction from Mike Ashley (Good and bad horror? Really? Well written and badly written yes, but to label whole styles of horror as 'bad' because they don't meet your self-created standards of 'literature'? I don't know who you are and, frankly, I don't care. You're wrong.) I am now reading the stories, many of which are, of course, classics by classic horror writers, some I'm very familiar with, others less so. Been good so far - you know, in the end I've got these stories in other collections and I'd rather read them there than in a book with such a nauseating introduction. Sorry but I give up.

  • Scott
    2018-10-07 07:45

    A good amalgamation of short stories by famous horror writers. I bought this mainly to see which writers I should explore in more depth. Highlights for me were: "The Derelict" by Hodgson, "The Willows" by Blackwood, "The Lottery" by Jackson, "The Monkey's Paw" by Jacobs, and "Oh, Whistle, and I'll Come to You, My Lad" by James.

  • Ted Gault
    2018-09-28 05:44

    Probably the best collection of older horror stories I've come across! I've found most older horror fiction kind of lackluster, if only because the original pieces have been copied and often improved upon so much in contemporary work. But, in my opinion, all of THESE stories are eminently re-readable.

  • OnixJihane
    2018-10-19 02:37

    got to love the Dracula Story...

  • Seth Augenstein
    2018-09-30 03:57

    A great, eclectic collection.