Read Apex Magazine Issue 56 by Sigrid Ellis Ursula Vernon Gene O’Neill Pat Cadigan Jess Nevins Online

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Apex Magazine is a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field. New issues are released on the first Tuesday of every month. We are a 2013 Hugo Award nominee for Best Semiprozine! FICTION Pale Skin, Gray Eyes by Gene O'Neill Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon Dispatches from the RApex Magazine is a monthly science fiction, fantasy, and horror magazine featuring original, mind-bending short fiction from many of the top pros of the field. New issues are released on the first Tuesday of every month. We are a 2013 Hugo Award nominee for Best Semiprozine! FICTION Pale Skin, Gray Eyes by Gene O'Neill Jackalope Wives by Ursula Vernon Dispatches from the Revolution by Pat Cadigan NONFICTION Women in Pre–1947 Chinese and Indian Horror Fiction and Film by Jess Nevins Interview with Gene O'Neill Interview with incoming Editor-in-Chief Sigrid Ellis Resolute: Notes from the Editor-in-Chief by Sigrid Ellis Cover art by Emma Rios. Edited by Sigid Ellis....

Title : Apex Magazine Issue 56
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781370525430
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 92 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Apex Magazine Issue 56 Reviews

  • karen
    2019-05-25 04:04

    “She was beautiful,” he said. As if it were a reason.As if it mattered.As if it had ever mattered.tadiana recommended this to me as being reminiscent of Leigh Bardugo's shorts but with a Native American twist.which is how you get my attention. and that is absolutely the perfect description of this story: it has all the dark glittering fabulism of those bardugo shorts i love so much* while still feeling like a classic fairytale; a perfect blend of modern and traditional sensibilities shot through with beauty and regret and fairytale tropes. and of course "fairytale tropes" are never limited to the fantasy realm - there's always a kernel of something that resonates and bleeds into the real world; in this case, issues of sexuality and consent, kindness and duty. and sacrifice. what would a fairytale be without sacrifice?this is a spin on the celtic selkie tale. i don't know enough about native american mythology to determine whether it's an adaptation of an existing, analogous story or the author's own cultural transplant. instead of the selkie's woman/seal mashup, in which the creature can be captured and claimed as a wife by a man who steals her discarded sealskin while she bathes, this is about women who transform into jackalopes (or vice versa?), and a man who believes he's been given the go-ahead to woo-by-skin-theft a particularly beautiful and energetic jackalope wife as she dances by the firelight with others of her kind.this sense of entitlement comes from his having some magic in his blood, and the irresistibility-to-women he has always experienced as a result:A little magic is worse than none, for it draws the wrong sort of attention. It gave this young man feverish eyes and made him sullen…He was tall and slim and had dark hair and young women found him fascinating.This sort of thing happens often enough, even with boys as mortal as dirt. There’s always one who learned how to brood early and often, and always girls who think they can heal him.but his confidence leads him to make a tragic miscalculation with this jackalope wife; his panic and lack of resolve results in a suffering beyond his ability to process, let alone heal. he runs to grandma harken, whose knowledge and competence in magic and the healing arts are unparalleled, and whose familial affection for the boy, Pretty and useless and charming when he set out to be, does not prevent her from being horrified at what he has done, cursing his goddamn pity before she takes matters into her own hands:"Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both, because now you’ve made a mess you can’t clean up in a hurry.”it's a story full of arresting imagery, hinting at a larger mythology: And now you will ask me about the musicians that played for the jackalope wives. Well, if you can find a place where they’ve been dancing, you might see something like sidewinder tracks in the dust, and more than that I cannot tell you. The desert chews its secrets right down to the bone.and a fantastic character in grandma harken (who features in another story i have yet to read: The Tomato Thief) and whose sympathetic but matter-of-fact delivery of hard truths:“He’ll kill you,” the old woman said. “Or cure you. Or maybe both. You don’t have to do it. This is the bit where you get a choice. But when it’s over, you’ll be all the way something, even if it’s just all the way dead.”and down-to-earth resigned fatalism:“It was easier that way,” she said. “You get over what you can’t have faster that you get over what you could. And we shouldn’t always get what we think we want.”make her a fascinating character, even before we learn all her juicy backstory, and boy do i need more more more about this backstory.i loved this story every bit as much as a bardugo short,** and i can't wait for tadiana to find more hidden freebie gems on the internet for me to devour.read it for yourself here:http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...*don't know what i'm talking about?? they are here! they are free!! they are excellent!!!the witch of duvathe too-clever foxlittle knife** still don't know what i'm talking about??? see *, silly!

  • Nataliya
    2019-05-20 02:41

    "It’s different when you got a choice."This story is perfect. I have no other words for it - it's simply perfect. It takes only a few minutes to read, and yet in those few pages it easily achieves everything that it possibly can. It's incredibly atmospheric, lyrical, full of vivid imagery and told in a fairy-tale cadence and yet concise and complete and saying so much while saying little.The legend is old and familiar. Find a magically beautiful changeling, trick her to stay with you, forcibly separate her from everything that was hers and make her yours, turn love into possession to fulfill your heart's desire. Because the point of the stories, quests and legends is getting what you want, isn't it?"So the young man with the touch of magic watched the jackalope wife dancing and you know as well as I do what young men dream about. We will be charitable. She danced a little apart from her fellows, as he walked a little apart from his.Perhaps he thought she might understand him. Perhaps he found her as interesting as the girls found him.Perhaps we shouldn’t always get what we think we want."In a North American desert at half-moon young men watch jackalope wives dance - the part-jackrabbit part-antelope creatures that shed their skins for the night of dancing in the moonlight when they appear as the beautiful, alluring, breathtaking women. And as it always happens, one of the young men - the broody one with a touch of magic - wants, needs, to make one of them his own, to own and possess his heart's desire. "Now, it happened there was a young man in town who had a touch of magic on him. It had come down to him on his mother’s side, as happens now and again, and it was worse than useless.A little magic is worse than none, for it draws the wrong sort of attention."____________"This sort of thing happens often enough, even with boys as mortal as dirt. There’s always one who learned how to brood early and often, and always girls who think they can heal him.Eventually the girls learn better."Everyone knows what to do - grab her changeling skin and burn it, tying her to the world of humans, giving her no choice but to stay with you.“She was beautiful,” he said. As if it were a reason.As if it mattered.As if it had ever mattered.But what do you do if it's not that easy? If something goes terribly wrong?“Of course it hurts her!” yelled Grandma. “You think you can have your skin and your freedom burned away in front of you and not scream? Sweet mother Mary, boy, think about what you’re doing! Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both, because now you’ve made a mess you can’t clean up in a hurry.But forget the careless selfish young man. Forget the jackalope wife whose desires do not matter to him. They are in the story but it's not their story. It is the story of Grandma Harken, the one who picks up the pieces, the one who does not let love cloud her judgment, the one who has no illusions about the way the world works. The one who to me is a spiritual cousin of Pratchett's Granny Weatherwax.The one who knows the price and knows that it must be paid. "You get over what you can’t have faster that you get over what you could. And we shouldn’t always get what we think we want.”___________________It's a wonderful, wonderful story, fully deserving its Nebula win (and would have deserved a Hugo win if the world had been fair)._________________________Read it for yourself here:http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    2019-05-04 20:45

    When the sun goes down and the moon comes up, the jackalope wives take off their rabbit skins and dance in the moonlight to the notes of wild music. ("And now you will ask me about the musicians that played for the jackalope wives. Well, if you can find a place where they’ve been dancing, you might see something like sidewinder tracks in the dust, and more than that I cannot tell you. The desert chews its secrets right down to the bone.") But, so the story goes, if a man steals a jackalope wife's rabbit skin and burns it, the jackalope wife will stay in human form and he can keep her.Grandma Harken's moody, semi-magical grandson tries to do this, but loses his nerve when the girl screams in pain and gives her half-burnt rabbit skin back to her. When she puts it on, she's not only got severe burns but is caught between her two shapes, human and jackalope. It's up to Granny Harken to try to fix the mess her grandson has created.I loved Vernon's writing in this:The Patterned Man stared at her, unblinking. The ravens laughed to themselves at the bottom of the wash. Then he dipped his head and bowed to Grandma Harken and a rattlesnake as long as a man slithered away into the evening.Grandma Harken (love the implications of her name!) is great: she's impatient and abrupt, but also caring (though she tries to hide it with her grumpy comments) and insightful. This story is enjoyable not only on the surface, but on deeper levels, as it explores themes of selfishness, sacrifice, and respect for the ways of nature, among other things.This is a fantastic short story, evocative of Native American legends, and the winner of the 2014 Nebula award. Seriously, go read this if you have any love for fantasy.Free online at Apex Magazine.Art credit: Sarah Petkus.

  • Melanie
    2019-05-01 22:52

    You can read this for free: Here from Apex Magazine!Good Lord, this story was so close to perfect! I absolutely loved and adored it. Twist and turns throughout, with a perfect ending, all wrapped up in such a short tale. This story is about jackalope rabbits, which can turn into very beautiful women, who love to dance the night away. Many men desire to make them their wives, and by stealing the rabbit coats they shed while dancing, but by doing so you will also be trapping them into not being able to shift back into their rabbit forms. Some very cruel men burn their skins, while forcing them to be humans forever. I read this in The New Voices of Fantasy!Blog | Twitter | Tumblr | Instagram | Youtube | Twitch

  • Althea Ann
    2019-05-02 23:43

    A 'selkie story' set in the southwest. This story manages to do something rare: it takes a familiar folktale/myth, gives us a truly authentic-feeling rendition, and adds something truly new (and significant), and something unexpected. Beautiful, and sad.

  • Sr3yas
    2019-04-27 01:51

    Nebula Award for Best Short Story 2014Jackalope wives is set in a unique world where mythologies are not myths, but very much real as you and me. What makes it stand out of them all is the touch of a magical authenticity which is rare when you infuse myth with the real world. The story is absolutely perfect! I am delighted that this story won Nebula in 2014 and Its sequel, Tomato Thief won Hugo for best Novelette in 2017. I hope for more!Read it ------>here

  • Elena May
    2019-05-04 00:48

    “Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both”Prequel to the brilliant The Tomato Thief. A beautiful, myth-like short story of kindness, taking responsibility, and doing what’s right in spite of the sacrifices.If you, like me, are not very familiar with North American folklore and don’t know what a jackalope is, it’s this:Sweet, but strong and dangerous. And that’s exactly what this tale is! Jackalope Wives draws inspiration from Native American folklore – shape-shifters, rattlesnakes, ravens, coyotes. The story packs so much emotion within its short length.

  • Jess ❈Harbinger of Blood-Soaked Rainbows❈
    2019-05-22 22:57

    When I saw two of my friends, Tadiana and karen read this and gave it five stars, I knew I needed to jump on board. And I am so happy I did!You get over what you can’t have faster than you get over what you could. And we shouldn’t always get what we think we want.This is a gorgeous short story dripping with beautiful prose, traces of magic, and Native American folklore. Vernon certainly has a way with words. Her story kept me glued to it the entire time. I loved her creativity, her subtle use of the mystical, and her ability to think outside the box.The jackalope wives are mystical creatures who shed their rabbit skins in the evening and dance in the desert to wild music. The human boys from the town covet them and want to make them their own, but it is very difficult to do so. If a boy finds the shedded skin of a dancing jackalope wife, he must pitch it in the fire and the jackalope wife will be his. But the price of owning a wild thing is very steep, and the consequences are something not every boy can bear.“But it sounded like it was hurting her!” he shot back. “You weren’t there! She screamed like a dying rabbit!”“Of course it hurts her!” yelled Grandma. “You think you can have your skin and your freedom burned away in front of you and not scream? Sweet mother Mary, boy, think about what you’re doing! Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both, because now you’ve made a mess you can’t clean up in a hurry.”Grandma Harken is awakened to her grandson one evening who comes to her door with a captured jackalope wife in his arms. He couldn't commit to burning the skin and gave it to her half charred which caused her to shift and become a mutant caught between two forms. The poor thing is in misery, and Grandma Harken, though tough and dutiful isn't completely heartless and cannot end the poor creature's life. After seeing her suffer, Grandma Harken knows she must turn the jackalope wife over to the mysteries of the desert and let fate take its turn with her. This story was haunting and beautiful and luscious and I wish it were longer. You can read it for free here:http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...4.5 stars

  • Miriam
    2019-05-23 22:37

    http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...

  • Lynn
    2019-04-28 00:01

    Great story.....read it online: http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...

  • Annet
    2019-05-21 00:58

    I'm getting the hang of short stories. To the point. Sharp. Powerful. A gust of story, a twist,.. and then it's over. This one, intriguing, mysterious. A fairy tale. A fantasy story. Thanks for the goodreads friends who led me there.You can read it here. http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...Yes, enjoyed it. 3.5+ review. And hey, there's a sequel: The Tomato Thief. Already feel like reading it but will keep it as a treat.... for the right moment.... http://www.apex-magazine.com/the-toma...“You get over what you can’t have faster that you get over what you could. And we shouldn’t always get what we think we want.”

  • Alina
    2019-05-19 00:05

    Jackalope Wives by Ursula VernonSimply gorgeous!

  • Ivonne Rovira
    2019-05-09 00:07

    Thank you, Nataliya, for your recommendation of this wonderful story. Ursula Vernon's "Jackalope Wives" is a science-fiction short story for people who think they don't like science fiction. I cannot do this short story justice, but for a fine review, read Nataliya's take here. You can read Nebula Award-winning "Jackalope Wives" here, or, better yet, listen to the podcast reading here.

  • A.M.
    2019-05-11 21:51

    An award winning short story you can read here:http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...On rare nights, the jackalope wives dance around a fire in the desert. Men watch them, but they can’t catch them. But men always watch what they can’t catch.Now, it happened there was a young man in town who had a touch of magic on him. It had come down to him on his mother’s side, as happens now and again, and it was worse than useless.A little magic is worse than none, for it draws the wrong sort of attention. It gave this young man feverish eyes and made him sullen.And all the girls love him. Yeah… I’d believe that.He’s so sure of himself that he thinks he can catch a jackalope wife. And everyone knows that you have to burn their skin to keep them from changing back. But he messes it up, and he goes to the only person he thinks can help him, his Grandma Harken.“Of course it hurts her!” yelled Grandma. “You think you can have your skin and your freedom burned away in front of you and not scream? Sweet mother Mary, boy, think about what you’re doing! Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both, because now you’ve made a mess you can’t clean up in a hurry.”Hmmm… now how does she know that?***I read the stories out of order *rolls eyes at self* (see where it says number 2, AM?)I had never heard of a jackalope but it is a mythical animal of North American folklore described as a jackrabbit with antelope horns.It’s only 5,000 words but Ursula Vernon manages to fit more world building in here than some full fantasy novels I’ve read.Of course there’s a journey, of course there’s a price. And the Father of Rabbits sounds wonderful. (and is clearly an old lover.)“It was easier that way,” she said. “You get over what you can’t have faster that you get over what you could. And we shouldn’t always get what we think we want.”I really like Grandma Harken. I like the way family comes first for her. The way she’s willing to make a sacrifice for another woman she doesn’t even know; especially one who is young and at the start of her life. That resonates.5 dancing jackalope stars

  • Athena
    2019-05-06 00:40

    The moon came up and the sun went down. The moonbeams went shattering down to the ground and the jackalope wives took off their skins and danced.They danced like young deer pawing the ground, they danced like devils let out of hell for the evening. They swung their hips and pranced and drank their fill of cactus–fruit wine.5 stars? Yeah, so when I like things I really, REALLY like them (and it also won the Nebula for best short story in 2014). Good stuff.Jackalope Wives is a gorgeously rich, evocative piece of short fiction from Ursula Vernon (aka T. Kingfisher), a sorceress who strips the English language down to bleached bone and weaves a net of it to capture enchanted readers. I'm from sidehill-gouger* and jackalope country: for me now the dance of the wives is every bit as real as the jackalopes and gougers themselves .Read for free at: Jackalope Wives- - - - - - - - - - - - - *Sidehill-gougers are shy, shy critters, sorta cattle-like, but their legs are waaaay longer on one side than the other so they stay on the hillsides and make two trails instead of one when they move around, and they have to circle the hill instead of just turning around if they go too far one way. That's why western hillsides have layers of skinny trails from bottom to top - now you know!

  • Nadine Jones
    2019-05-03 04:58

    “It’s different when you got a choice,” said Grandma Harken.I'll tell you what, I did not expect that from the author of Dragonbreath. Or maybe I need to take a closer look at Dragonbreath.That was really just lovely, I was teleported to the hot desert under a blue blue sky, with the javelinas and the snakes ...The javelina dropped their heads and ignored them as they left the wash behind.The sun was overhead and the sky turned turquoise, a color so hard you could bash your knuckles on it. A raven croaked overhead and another one snickered somewhere off to the east. It reminded me a bit of the Trickster Coyote stories I've read from Plains mythology. And for such a short story, it really surprised me with that twist, I did NOT see that coming!! But of course there were secrets ......and more than that I cannot tell you. The desert chews its secrets right down to the bone.Like all fables, this tells a fantastical story that resonates quite strongly in real life themes. In this case the main themes are choice, and consent, and understanding that you shouldn't always get what you want.I also really liked how each animal that Grandma Harken passed had its own kind of magic, it was unexpected, but it also made sense.Read it for yourself here, because my review is not doing it justice. C'mon, this won a Nebula Award!!http://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...

  • Vishakha
    2019-04-26 22:50

    First Read this book herehttp://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalop...Done? Great.I don't want to write a review which is longer than the story itself, although I am very much capable of it.SO! this short-story is not written for children. But the way its written is that whimsical, mystical, beautiful way that children's books are written. And I absolutely adore children's literature. Part fairytale and part spook, with a hint of mythology. Its a simple story always on the verge of becoming an epic. Miss Vernon has said alot in words so few.My favourite line:"Be cruel or be kind, but don’t be both, because now you’ve made a mess you can’t clean up in a hurry"

  • Basia
    2019-05-11 04:42

    Oh wow, was this one a TREAT!!! A story of what we want. What should be ours. What shouldn't be. Wishes, both those fulfilled and those ignored. Even those delayed. Absolutely lovely. Not to be missed. Worth the half hour or so!

  • Leseparatist
    2019-05-07 20:42

    June was my pride reading month and I think July will be my "shorts I've been bookmarking forever" reading month. I'm not sure I'll have the patience for individual reviews.That said, I loved the imagery, the style and the theme of justice here. This was a very good story.

  • Courtney
    2019-05-10 23:56

    Read: Pale Skin, Gray Eyes by Gene O'Neill. 3/5 stars - read Jan 13/16.(view spoiler)[This kind of fits the tone of "The Lottery", in that what initially seems to be a quiet little community is slowly revealed to be much darker in reality. Here, the 'blue-skins' community reveals it's darker colours much more quickly, disturbing readers with racist speech and ideas reflective of things said in our own world's history (and likely among the more prejudiced elements today) . This prejudice becomes shockingly clear towards the end, when you learn just how far the 'blue-skins' will go to maintain their self-imposed isolation. The society's prejudices make the story a bit off-putting at first, from a readers' point of view. Most of the time, we're used to liking the characters we read about and we find ways to sympathize with them, or imagine ourselves in their shoes as they find their way. So when we find a character who shows traits that we find unlikeable or offensive, it can be hard to appreciate a story on it's own merits and not focus on it's negative traits.In "Pale Skin, Gray Eyes", the main characters of the story are children, and with them being children, most people might come to the conclusion that what they say is less of a biased personal opinion, and more them parroting the beliefs they pick up from those around them. That a child wouldn't be seen as having the experiences and exposure to realize that the commonly-held 'truths' aren't necessarily correct.In a way, though, I think that that could really be said of the 'blue-skin' society as a whole. As self-contained and isolated as they are, they've cut off from the other cultures in their world and as such have very little experience dealing with them except for what they hear about from rumours and their histories. Unlike most stories, where the characters would usually gain said experience by meeting & getting to know those of their neighbouring cultures, and lose their prejudices over time, this short takes a much different approach. In fact, by the end of the story, most readers would probably come to the conclusion that the blue-skin's prejudices - at least against their 'white-skin' neighbours - may, in fact, be justified. The prisoner, captured for the sole reason of having landed within their borders, proceeds to free herself from her bonds upon being sentenced to death and begin to rend through the people around her. Personally, given what we know of the society's history, I wonder if there's not a little more to it. We know that there was a war in the past, where the 'white-skins' supposedly committed atrocities against their enemies, the 'brown-skins'. And that in the last leg when the 'brown-skins' were winning, the 'blue-skins' jumped in to ally with them and help defeat the 'white-skins'. I can't imagine that caused much good-will between the societies. Not to mention that the ban on foreigners is apparently a long-standing order - has it been broken in the past? Did the 'blue-skins' attack others of the 'white-skin' society for breaching their territory in the past, when the 'blue-skins' still ventured outside their walls? I'd imagine executions simply for wandering onto the wrong lands wouldn't make a good impression on your neighbours. Is a new war brewing, and the 'white-skins' decided to make a pre-meditated attack before the 'blue-skins' could jump in at the last minute again? Sadly, as this is a short story it's unlikely we'll ever find out.(hide spoiler)]The story is quite interesting, overall, especially the world building. I think it would be quite interesting to read more about this world and it's various cultures, what caused them to evolve the ways they have. It would be nice to see what the other societies think of the blue-skins, as well - somehow I don't think it would be quite as favourably as the 'blue-skins' themselves might expect. The masks in particular were interesting, reminding me of the burqas used by some middle-eastern societies, or the masks used in historical Italy. Overall I'd be willing to read more by this author in the future, even books or stories set in the same world.

  • Sidsel Pedersen
    2019-05-19 04:48

    I have read Anasi Boys and I have read a little Sandman both by Neil Gaiman, Jackalope Wives puts me in mind of both. It reads very much like a myth of some pre-industrial people. Where or which isn't’t ever clear, which I do not mind as it doesn’t matter to the story.This also reminds me of the selkie stories that has been making the rounds the last few years, but this is a different kind creature altogether. While many of the selkie stories seems to center around the jealousy of the other women and envy of the men who does not have a selkie wife and the selkies’ endless longing back to the sea is also a theme. None of those themes makes it into Jackalope Wives. This is a story about (thinking hard) getting what you should not want, about the fact that you can’t both be kind and heartless at the same time, if you try things goes all wrong. It is about being willing to offer your live so that someone else don’t have to suffer. It is about the kindness and the hardness of old women, of grandmothers.It is a very good story. It holds so much emotion without pulling my heart-strings. It has the fable or myth-like air about it that I always finds fascinating. It is the same fascination that draws me to the myths of old. To the norse mythology, to the Finish ones, to the Greek ones. You tell a story about something that is so obviously fantastical (dear-bunnies that turn into woman and dance in the desert) and that is a perfectly fine story on its own, but you are also telling a different story at the same time. It is one of the oldest forms of storytelling and it has always drawn me. When it is done well as it is in this case it is amazing.I really liked the ending as well, it was not what I was expecting and I liked it a lot.So Ursula Vernon thank you for a fascinating, beautiful and scary story with a lot of heart. And thank you for a story about an old woman.See more of my reviews here: http://wp.me/p40HVI-gT

  • Skip
    2019-05-09 21:05

    The jackalope is a mythical creature from Native American folklore, and this award-winning short story by Ursula Vernon is very well written, about the folly of a young man's desires and its consequences.

  • Andrew Hickey
    2019-05-25 21:56

    A very strong story about choices and patriarchy, responsibilities and rewards. The basic plot is a selkie story, as so many of the most popular recent fantasy stories have been, but this one is written in a style that reminds me of Stephen King's better work -- apart from the main character, who seems to come straight from Pratchett. In another world I can imagine Granny Weatherwax making exactly the same choices, and for the same reasons.Another short story that would have been on the Hugo ballot were it not for vote-rigging fascists getting vastly inferior work on there instead.

  • Soorya
    2019-04-29 04:41

    The moon came up and the sun went down. The moonbeams went shattering down to the ground and the jackalope wives took off their skins and danced. A haunting reimagining of the selkie tale, with a wonderful, unexpected ending. I've read only 3 of her short stories, but Ursula Vernon’s already jumped up into my “must-read” list; she writes such beautiful mythic fantasy.You can read it for free here.

  • Terri
    2019-05-25 01:03

    Ursula Vernon is just fantastic. What a great little story.

  • Catherine
    2019-05-23 03:54

    Really liked this when I read it for awards season reading and glad it won. If you haven't read Vernon's work before, this is a very good introduction.

  • Hadas Sloin
    2019-05-27 03:02

    Wow, what a short story - beautiful and fascinating and original. It definitely left we me wanting to read more of the Vernon's stories.

  • Maittri
    2019-05-18 22:55

    One of the best short stories I have ever read.I read this here: https://www.apex-magazine.com/jackalo...

  • Sheila
    2019-05-07 04:41

    Excellent lyrical fairy story about magical creatures who change into beautiful women and man's desire to possess them. Winner of Nebula Short Story Award 2014

  • Ruth
    2019-05-08 04:05

    I love this. I love everything about this.