Read Poems from the First World War by Gaby Morgan Online

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Poems from the First World War is a moving and powerful collection of poems written by soldiers, nurses, mothers, sweethearts and family and friends who experienced the war from different standpoints. It records the early excitement and patriotism, the bravery, friendship and loyalty of the soldiers, and heartbreak, disillusionment and regret as the war went on to damage aPoems from the First World War is a moving and powerful collection of poems written by soldiers, nurses, mothers, sweethearts and family and friends who experienced the war from different standpoints. It records the early excitement and patriotism, the bravery, friendship and loyalty of the soldiers, and heartbreak, disillusionment and regret as the war went on to damage a generation. It includes poems from Wilfred Owen, Rupert Brooke, Vera Brittain, Eleanor Farjeon, Edward Thomas, Laurence Binyon, John McCrae, Siegfried Sassoon and many more. The Imperial War Museum was founded in 1917 to collect and display material relating to the ‘Great War’, which was still being fought. Today IWM is unique in its coverage of conflicts, especially those involving Britain and the Commonwealth, from the First World War to the present. They seek to provide for, and to encourage, the study and understanding of the history of modern war and wartime experience....

Title : Poems from the First World War
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 20751951
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 208 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Poems from the First World War Reviews

  • Trish
    2019-05-26 06:46

    AftermathHave you forgotten yet?...For the world's events have rumbled on since those gagged days,Like traffic checked while at the crossing of city-ways:And the haunted gap in your mind has filled with thoughts that flowLike clouds in the lit heaven of life; and you're a man reprieved to go,Taking your peaceful share of Time, with joy to spare.But the past is just the same--and War's a bloody game...Have you forgotten yet?...Look down, and swear by the slain of the War that you'll never forget.Do you remember the dark months you held the sector at Mametz--The nights you watched and wired and dug and piled sandbags on parapets?Do you remember the rats; and the stenchOf corpses rotting in front of the front-line trench--And dawn coming, dirty-white, and chill with a hopeless rain?Do you ever stop and ask, 'Is it all going to happen again?'Do you remember that hour of din before the attack--And the anger, the blind compassion that seized and shook you thenAs you peered at the doomed and haggard faces of your men?Do you remember the stretcher-cases lurching backWith dying eyes and lolling heads--those ashen-greyMasks of the lads who once were keen and kind and gay?Have you forgotten yet?...Look up, and swear by the green of the spring that you'll never forget. --Siegfried Sassoon --I was lucky enough to have been born a long time after the two World Wars but although most of the stuff I know about them comes from history books, poetry and documentaries, I've always felt this urge to commemorate what has happened and it has since become a matter dear to my heart. I want to never forget.This book features 114 poems about World War I. However, what makes this collection so special is the fact that each and every author of these 114 poems has experienced WWI first-hand! Soldiers, nurses, family members, spouses and friends of soldiers are giving their personal insight into what it was like - either behind the lines or in the trenches themselves.So to answer the question from the picture above: we should remember in honour of every single fallen soldier or civilian, for their sacrifice, for the pain it caused their loved ones and friends, and for ourselves because something as horrible as those two wars should never happen again (though it probably will even though warfare has changed in the meantime).

  • Angie Rhodes
    2019-06-05 09:16

    Beautiful, and so sad ,

  • irene
    2019-05-23 08:06

    A friend got me this book for my birthday and I expected it to be just another collection of war poetry written by soldiers, but surprisingly, it turned out to be much more than that! Of course there's plenty of poems about life in the trenches and about the destruction and desolation of war, but I liked the different perspectives that are reflected in this collection. There are poems by soldiers, but also by fathers, mothers and lovers. I'd say it's a pretty basic collection that offers a wide range of points of view on the disasters of war, so it's useful for people like me who have not read much poetry about it, but is interested in it and does not know very well where to start.

  • Charlotte Stevenson
    2019-06-04 05:15

    They shall not grow old, as we that are left grow old:Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.