Read Consequence: The Aftermath (Innocent until 'Made' Guilty #2) by Dwight Edgar Abbott Online

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Title : Consequence: The Aftermath (Innocent until 'Made' Guilty #2)
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 21178359
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 308 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Consequence: The Aftermath (Innocent until 'Made' Guilty #2) Reviews

  • Brian
    2019-04-25 21:35

    I don't know how you do it, Mr. Vollmann. Your bibliography for Rising Up and Rising Down is currently at 370 books (and rising); I'm just trying to pick through a few of books you've referenced and I'm not sure that I can hang. This non-fiction violence is getting to me. And I've only read a few off the list. How were you able to consult all of these books and then write a 3,500 page magnum opus on violence?In Abbott's I Cried, You Didn't Listen, the author details the horror of being placed into the California youth correctional system at the age of 9, raped by staff members, brutalized and humiliated by an institution specifically created to do these things to children. This isn't Abu Ghraib, this is the USA, and it happens every goddamned day. Oh yeah, Dwight was put into the CYA system because his parents were in a horrific auto accident in Nevada and he had no extended family to care for him and thus became a ward of the state. Shudder.Consequence is the follow-up the Abbott's first horror tale where he details what happens to a human that is systematically de-humanized and degregated for nine years. He was the youngest inmate sent to San Quentin. The stories of what happens to him - and other inmates - over the next 50 years (yes, he has been in the prison systems since 9) are just too terrible to believe. If only they weren't. America's prison system is just so dire, so horrific - is it any wonder why recidivism for paroled inmates is so high when we spend all this money on an environment that makes them into perfect criminals?You know what? Don't read this book. Not that you shouldn't, it's just that I like you. And I don't want you to feel as awful as I have these past couple of days after finishing this and feeling yet again the hopelessness of humanity. We suck.So I'm going to shut off this computer and go do the only thing that will make me happy.Prancercising.

  • Danny Tyran
    2019-05-19 17:51

    Oh, my...! I have to catch my breath and think a bit before writing my review because I want to do justice to the author. Let me just say for now that Dwight Abbott's biography is a deeply disturbing and exceptionally well written document. It gives you to feel (almost live) what the author went through and it does it in a so raw and so real way that you don't read it without putting yourself into question.-----------What can I write that really does justice to this exceptional man and great author, except to ask you to read the two books of his biography? Read them right away! Believe me, you will not regret it. Even if you have trouble reading books about injustice and cruelty, you will love them. They will dive deep inside and move you. But Dwight Abbott is so combative, we can consider that he is a survivor of a man-made jungle, more cruel than that with trees and wildlife. Because humans can be far more cruel than any wild animal. Wild animals take at least care for their children! Us, we put them in cages and we forget them there. Come what may! But what happens is that through constant mistreatment, abuses and rapes, we transform them gradually into predators increasingly dangerous and then we pretend that we are shocked by the final result.http://goodmenproject.com/ethics-valu...The picture is one of Sonny in cell 5.

  • Danielle Tremblay
    2019-05-06 22:31

    OMG! How can you live such a life? If at least I could tell that there aren't babies sent in jails anymore... But I can't. I know there is still a lot of them who live in hell at the moment, just like the author of this book. And USA pretends to be a civilized country! But I know that this is happening in many other countries.(view spoiler)[This book is the sequel of I Cried, You Didn't Listen: A First Person Look at a Childhood Spent Inside CYA Youth Detention Systems. The author describes in it how the gangs like Aryan Brotherhood, Pink Panthers, la nuestra familia and others began in jail and how they affected the life of the prisoners and of all the America. He also speaks of George Jackson and his death while trying to escape for San Quentin. The author describes too his own attempt at escaping the same jail, how he was nearly kill by members of the Arian Brotherhood and how he was kept 4½ years in isolation, a rat his only friend! This seems incredible, but I'm sure this is real. (hide spoiler)]It's a hard book to read. But it must be read! I'd like that a good movie director to make a movie out of this story. It'd become a success, I'm sure.Just read it!

  • Judy Stambaugh
    2019-04-29 20:40

    Amazingly eye opening! The horrors of the child penal system from an "inmate's, personal experience.This book is about how a normal little boy ,in the 1950's, ended up in "the system" and the effects his experiences had on the rest of his life. Learning at 9 years old that he had to quickly decide if he would allow himself to be used and abused or would he stand up for himself and fight back. This is how children in "The System" are groomed for prison. The author , DEWIGHT ABBOTT, grew up in this environment and is now serving 4 life sentences in the California prison system. My heart goes out to this man, who is a product of our treatment of children who fall into the system through circumstances beyond anyone's control. I pray his remaining time is much calmer than what life has dealt him for most of his life. Thank you for your story Mr. Abbott. I applaud you for bringing to light the horrors that go on and the need of change.

  • Karren
    2019-05-04 15:38

    After reading Abbott's first book, I Cried, You Didn't Listen, I couldn't wait to see if he would write a second book letting us know what happened to him after leaving the juvenile system. It was difficult at times to read that his life never really changed much from when he was a child growing up in the CYA, but at least it showed that he is survivor - no matter what has been thrown his way, he has overcome things that a normal person could never have.Along with tales of the brutality that is always pesent in prisons, Dwight shared a few stories that made me smile.I would encourage people to read both of Abbott's books, and if you have young people at risk in your life, share the books with them so that maybe they will re-think the way they are living so they do not spend the majority of their years behind bars.Merged review:After reading Abbott's first book, I Cried, You Didn't Listen, I couldn't wait to see if he would write a second book letting us know what happened to him after leaving the juvenile system. It was difficult at times to read that his life never really changed much from when he was a child growing up in the CYA, but at least it showed that he is survivor - no matter what has been thrown his way, he has overcome things that a normal person could never have.Along with tales of the brutality that is always pesent in prisons, Dwight shared a few stories that made me smile.I would encourage people to read both of Abbott's books, and if you have young people at risk in your life, share the books with them so that maybe they will re-think the way they are living so they do not spend the majority of their years behind bars.

  • Danielle Tremblay
    2019-05-09 17:44

    OMG! How can you live such a life? If at least I could tell that there aren't babies sent in jails anymore... But I can't. I know there is still a lot of them who live in hell at the moment, just like the author of this book. And USA pretends to be a civilized country! But I know that this is happening in many other countries.[This book is the sequel of I Cried, You Didn't Listen: A First Person Look at a Childhood Spent Inside CYA Youth Detention Systems. The author describes in it how the gangs like Aryan Brotherhood, Pink Panthers, la nuestra familia and others began in jail and how they affected the life of the prisoners and of all the America. He also speaks of George Jackson and his death while trying to escape for San Quentin. The author describes too his own attempt at escaping the same jail, how he was nearly kill by members of the Arian Brotherhood and how he was kept 4½ years in isolation, a rat his only friend! This seems incredible, but I'm sure this is real. (hide spoiler)]It's a hard book to read. But it must be read! I'd like that a good movie director to make a movie out of this story. It'd become a success, I'm sure.Just read it!

  • Adina
    2019-05-07 18:32

    If you thought Volume 1 of this book, "I Cried, You Didn't Listen", was hard to take in without being able to put down, you won't be disappointed. Dwight is naturally talented in exposing life's truths, horrors that most people tend to shut out and push away. No one can leave reading this book and the first volume of this book without being touched. This volume goes into depth about gang related details that are most likely a rarity to be found elsewhere. From the Aryan Brotherhood and its real roots, as well as the Nuestra Familia, the Mexican Mafia, the Black Panthers, and so on. The Afterward and Commentary are well worth the read as is the mini dictionary in the back.

  • ROBERT BOWIE
    2019-05-01 19:53

    Trauma is expensiveAbbott's works are compelling, brilliant; however, as he points out, political denial and expedience are powerful. Trauma costs -- individuals and society. Prisons, jails and juvenile detention graphically demonstrate the costs, yet they perpetuate the problem.

  • Kelly
    2019-04-24 15:37

    Hard, difficult, informative. Open a door to a world we would not otherwise know.