Read Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America by Sylviane A. Diouf Online

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In the summer of 1860, more than fifty years after the United States legally abolished the international slave trade, 110 men, women, and children from Benin and Nigeria were brought ashore in Alabama under cover of night. They were the last recorded group of Africans deported to the United States as slaves. Timothy Meaher, an established Mobile businessman, sent the slaveIn the summer of 1860, more than fifty years after the United States legally abolished the international slave trade, 110 men, women, and children from Benin and Nigeria were brought ashore in Alabama under cover of night. They were the last recorded group of Africans deported to the United States as slaves. Timothy Meaher, an established Mobile businessman, sent the slave ship, the Clotilda, to Africa, on a bet that he could "bring a shipful of niggers right into Mobile Bay under the officers' noses." He won the bet.This book reconstructs the lives of the people in West Africa, recounts their capture and passage in the slave pen in Ouidah, and describes their experience of slavery alongside American-born enslaved men and women. After emancipation, the group reunited from various plantations, bought land, and founded their own settlement, known as African Town. They ruled it according to customary African laws, spoke their own regional language and, when giving interviews, insisted that writers use their African names so that their families would know that they were still alive.The last survivor of the Clotilda died in 1935, but African Town is still home to a community of Clotilda descendants. The publication of Dreams of Africa in Alabama marks the 200th anniversary of the abolition of the transatlantic slave trade.Winner of the Wesley-Logan Prize of the American Historical Association (2007)...

Title : Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America
Author :
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ISBN : 9780195311044
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 340 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America Reviews

  • Margaret Sankey
    2019-01-09 03:40

    In 1860, an American slave dealer won a bet that he could bring a shipload of people into Mobile despite British and Federal prohibitions on the slave trade, and he won--the Clotilda delivered several hundred West Africans into the south just as the Civil War sealed off the trade forever. Amazingly, most of the survivors were able to reunite after emancipation, and they secured a section of land in south Alabama where they and their descendants live today (the last original settler died in 1935). Because they were first generation Africans, still speaking their native languages and practicing Islam, they remained isolated from other African-Americans nearby and became largely self-sufficient on their isolated river bend. It is both good and sad that a new bridge has brought them into wider contact with the 21st century, especially for young people who have a reason to return home, but at the cost of the loss of their independence, surviving craft skills and carefully passed on oral history.

  • Cherisse
    2018-12-30 00:48

    Fascinating and extraordinarily well researched. Diouf explores the experiences of the last Africans brought to America as they made sense of a new environment while being informed by their understanding of the world they left behind. Dreams of Africa adds to the rich tapestry of scholarship that examines the the complexity and the diversity of the black experience in slavery and in freedom.

  • Perry
    2019-01-13 00:37

    Fascinating historical account and anthropological studyImpeccably researched, very well-written book exploring how it happened that the last slave ship came through the port of Mobile, Alabama in the summer of 1860.As it happened, a scofflaw businessman from Alabama decided to hedge his bets in covertly bringing in slaves from Africa on the slave ship Clotilda in defiance of laws outlawing international slave trade. This is a splendid account of the slave ship Clotilda and its 110 women, men and children who were delivered into an already existing slave community.The author covers how these slaves handled life after emancipation in 1860 and tried, but failed, to return to Africa and then started a settlement later called Africatown, which makes the book also one fit for anthropological study on how these last slaves held onto their customs and social systems and language into this century despite the fact that the final Clotilda survivor passed away in the 1930s.

  • Albert
    2019-01-12 00:28

    I lost interest and did not finish; the tone is much too scholarly, focusing less on a great story and more on details and the different arguments/theses on each. Otherwise, it's the most complete and thorough telling of the Clotilda story.

  • Courtney
    2019-01-14 21:35

    Such an important book!

  • Christina
    2018-12-29 04:42

    For such a potentially interesting subject- this book is all over the place. Not only is it all over the place, but it is repetitive. I wanted to know more about the Africans who came over on Clotilda and their stories instead of Zora Neal Hurston's plagiarism. I wanted to know more about the Africans and their interactions with each other after freedom and this part of the story was indeed lacking. I wanted to know if any of the original group that came over on the boat and died here- did anyone back home connect with their history. Maybe this was briefly discussed somewhere in the book and got lost?

  • Kijani Mlima
    2019-01-05 21:44

    Engrossing Non-Fiction. The last slave ship to land in America on July 8, 1869. An ileagl landing due to the outlawing of importing Africans into the US. Dreams tells the story of the men who flaunted in order to "import" 115 souls into the US and sell them into slavery. More importantly it tells the story of those African slaves, and how they adjusted ( never actually full adjusted) to life in America. They managed to hold onto their language and cultures. They were from different ethnic groups, yet several of the African coalesced, and formed a unique, sustained community after the Civil war.

  • bill Holston
    2019-01-22 04:47

    This book was quite interesting to me, as it is an account about the last slave ship to enter the US, into Mobile, illegally, just prior to the Civil War. the event happened in Mobile, where I grew up. Thus there were Africans, speaking their tribal language, and living according To African culture well into the twentieth century. It's a very good look into the brutality of slavery as well.

  • Rosa Rose
    2019-01-23 02:31

    An amazing story, wonderfully written and extremely well researched. A fine piece of scholarship.

  • Amaru
    2019-01-15 01:28

    Very interested book about a tight knit group brought to the shores of the United States and their struggle to go back home and co-exist with their new neighbors.

  • Doris Raines
    2019-01-06 05:35

    Thats. Good. News. They. Finally. Made. Born. With. A. Real. Name. Know. Games. Doris

  • Christophe
    2019-01-11 01:33

    I didn't actually finish this book but what I read was really interesting.

  • Christopher Dickey
    2019-01-15 21:49

    Full of fascinating revelations and details about the last Africans brought to the United States as slaves (as far as we know) and their life in the South after emancipation.