Read The Nick Adams Stories by Ernest Hemingway Online

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The Nick Adams Stories show a memorable character growing from child to adolescent to soldier, veteran, writer & parent--a sequence closely paralleling events of Hemingway's life.The 1st section, called Northern Woods, includes "Three Shots", "Indian Camp", "The Doctor & the Doctor's Wife", "Ten Indians" & "The Indians Moved Away". The 2nd section, On His Own,The Nick Adams Stories show a memorable character growing from child to adolescent to soldier, veteran, writer & parent--a sequence closely paralleling events of Hemingway's life.The 1st section, called Northern Woods, includes "Three Shots", "Indian Camp", "The Doctor & the Doctor's Wife", "Ten Indians" & "The Indians Moved Away". The 2nd section, On His Own, includes "The Light of the World", "The Battler", "The Killers", "The Last Good Country" & "Crossing the Mississippi".The 3rd section, War, has "Night Before Landing", "Nick Sat Against the Wall", "Now I Lay Me", "A Way You'll Never Be" & "In Another Country". The 4th section, Soldier Home, has "Big Two-Hearted River", "The End of Something", "The Three-Day Blow" & "Summer People". The 5th section, Company of Two, has "Wedding Day", "On Writing", "An Alpine Idyll", "Cross-Country Snow" & "Fathers & Sons"....

Title : The Nick Adams Stories
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780848805241
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 268 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Nick Adams Stories Reviews

  • Gearóid
    2019-06-09 23:24

    This was Hemingway at his absolute best!I have read some of the Nick Adams stories before but never the complete collectionin one book.Loved every story!The writing was just so brilliant!He writes in such an elegant simple way and just leaves images in my mind that are so clear.Reading these stories i could nearly smell the fresh air as Nick Adams was fishing or campingor just eating a sandwich by the river or feel the cold water as he was wading into the river!Just awesome!Cant get enough of Hemingway!

  • Gregory
    2019-06-19 23:15

    Here's my admission: this collection is a sentimental favorite of mine. I have no objectivity when it comes to rating this collection. Why? I grew up in Michigan. I've traveled through much of the state (both peninsulas). I've been to Walloon Lake where Hemingway summered as a child at the family cottage called Windemere. I've visited the Little Traverse History Museum in Petoskey that houses a permanent exhibit on Hemingway in Michigan. But mostly because these stories resonate with my own childhood.As a young boy, my family (including some aunts, uncles, cousins and my Nana) rented lake cottages for a few summers on Black Lake. Here we swam almost daily; fished often; picked Huckleberries (one aunt made a terrific Huckleberry pie); played Euchre and checkers; and shot at cans in a nearby gravel pit. We usually stayed for 2 or 3 weeks during August. My arrival and departure depended on how the accommodations were arranged but usually us kids tried to arrive with whoever got there first and we tried to stay with whoever was departing last. There were fishing trips that came back with great catches and others that came back with just stories. There were lots of shared meals and almost nightly campfires near the small, yellow sandy beach. Was it ideal? No, we had our fights and petty moments. But was it fun and filled with life experiences? Absolutely and I have plenty of fond memories of those summers long since gone.So when I read Hemingway's Nick Adams stories (particularly the ones focusing on his adventures in northern Michigan), I make connections to the times and the joys (and the sorrows) that I too experienced during my Black Lake summers. These stories are Papa Hemingway's gift to Michigan and I treasure them.

  • Jay
    2019-06-14 03:25

    The Nick Adams Stories is one of the collections of Hemingway’s short stories published after his death. Organized by Phillip Young in 1972, it includes a total of 24 works presumably arranged in chronological order in regard to Nick Adam’s life rather than in regard to the actual date when Hemingway published the stories themselves. Young notes in his preface:Arranged in chronological sequence, the events of Nick’s life make up a meaningful narrative in which a memorable character grows from child to adolescent to soldier, veteran, writer, and parent—a sequence closely paralleling the events of Hemingway’s own life. In this arrangement Nick Adams, who for a long time was not widely recognized as a consistent character at all, emerges clearly as the first in a long line of Hemingway’s fictional selves.Of the 24 stories included in the volume, 16 had been published previously by Hemingway: 8, in In Our Time in 1924; 5, in Men Without Women in 1927; 3, in Winner Take Nothing in 1933. The remaining 8 were unpublished manuscripts and/or manuscript fragments that Hemingway had left among his papers.The stories are uneven in quality. Some are among the best of Hemingway’s fiction including, for example, “Indian Camp”, “The Battler”, “Big Two Hearted River” “Three-Day Blow” and “Fathers and Sons”. Others, generally those that Hemingway had not published and/or had not actually finished such as "The Last Good Company”, tend to be substandard.Although Young intended the order of the stories to follow Nick Adams fictional life, I am not certain that the arrangement is accurate. In particular, the stories included in the second section titled “On His Own” seem out of sequence:Young’s OrderTen IndiansThe Indians Moved AwayThe Light of the WorldThe BattlerThe KillersThe Last Good CompanyCrossing MississippiApparent OrderTen IndiansThe Last Good CompanyThe BattlerThe Indians Moved AwayThe Light of the WorldThe KillersCrossing MississippiStill, even ordered as they are, the collection does provide a more coherent sense of the struggles and challenges of one of Hemingway’s major fictional characters. With the stories in one volume, it is also easier to see the linkages between Hemingway’s life and that of Nick Adams. The stories flow clearly from northern Michigan and Nick’s youth; to Europe and Nick’s involvement in the war including his injuries sustained in battle; Nick’s return to Michigan and his recovery from the emotional strains of the war; his marriage and his return to Europe; his final reflections back in Michigan, with his son. In broad outlines, Nick’s life trajectory reflects part of Hemingway’s, a similarity that have led many to suggest that Nick Adams is one of Hemingway’s alter egos, although Nick does not follow Hemingway much after the early 1930s. Nick, except for World War One and a brief return to Europe, stays in Michigan.

  • Erik Graff
    2019-05-25 22:24

    At Grinnell College there was a self-proclaimed Diggers collective which, among things like free meals, parties, parades and other "happenings", ran a "free store" off the lounge of my south campus dorm, Loose Hall (renamed Augustus Stanley Owsley Hall by its residents). Basically, it was an disused cloakroom which students were urged to fill with unwanted, but still useful, items. Among other things, I found Hemingway's Nick Adams Stories there and allowed myself the pleasure of reading them while the school year was still on.The most memorable of the stories were those portraying Nick's return to his community in the northern midwest. Disillusioned, taciturn, he found such solace as could be found in the woods and upon the lakes, the portrayals of which I readily related to thanks to a lifetime of summers in the midwestern wilds. Furthermore, I enjoyed the stories because of their implicit critique of war, the conflict in Southeast Asia being very much on everyone's mind.

  • S Prakash
    2019-06-04 02:15

    Nick Adams stories are inspired by the author’s own experiences. Have picked it up, only for being written by Heming way. I doubt if someone were to read this book without knowing by whom it is written, she may not persist beyond couple of stories. The stories capture Nick Adam’s escapades and experiences in a chronological order. Some of them are good, for they capture the essence of the age of Nick at that point in time. Like getting exposed to the stark realities of the world during the childhood. Yet to Hemingway’s credit as Hemingway is revered for, the prose simply flows. His words flow like a fresh water river. Effortlessly, placid at times and turbid at others. His works are a training ground for aspiring writers as to how to write uncomplicated.

  • Mary Overton
    2019-06-05 00:10

    It can be unsettling, unnerving to revisit an author embraced during one's teenage years. Reader reaction can have less to do with literature than with memory and passion. I read all of Hemingway when I was in high school, and I had quite a crush on him. He became the first version of my Jungian "animus." Now, four decades later, I reread these stories and am stunned by the powerful feelings they generate - adolescent yearning, glorious self-confidence, a naive sense of ownership of all that is significant - yes, the world does revolve around me and why not? look at how marvelous it is to be young and alive. But emotion aside, the older reader in me was pleased to find well-crafted passages and true-to-the-ear dialog. A rewarding book.--from "The Last Good Country" pg. 84"Mr. John liked Nick Adams because he said he had original sin. Nick did not understand this but he was proud."'You're going to have things to repent, boy,' Mr. John had told Nick. 'That's one of the best things there is. You can always decide whether to repent them or not. But the thing is to have them.'" -- on insomnia after a war wound, from "Now I Lay Me" pg.126 & 130"I myself did not want to sleep because I had been living for a long time with the knowledge that if I ever shut my eyes in the dark and let myself go, my soul would go out of my body. I had been that way for a long time, ever since I had been blown up at night and felt it go out of me and go off and then come back. I tried never to think about it, but it had started to go since, in the nights, just at the moment of going off to sleep, and I could only stop it by a very great effort. So while now I am fairly sure that it would not really have gone out, yet then, that summer, I was unwilling to make the experiment....."If I could have a light to sleep I was not afraid to sleep, because I knew my soul would only go out of me if it were dark. So, of course, many nights I was where I could have a light and then I slept because I was nearly always tired and often very sleepy. And I am sure many times, too, that I slept without knowing it - but I never slept knowing it..."-- the opening of "In Another Country" pg. 149"In the fall the war was always there, but we did not go to it any more. It was cold in the fall in Milan and the dark came very early. Then the electric lights came on, and it was pleasant along the streets looking in the windows. There was much game hanging outside the shops, and the snow powdered in the fur of the foxes and wind blew their tails. The deer hung stiff and heavy and empty, and small birds blew in the wind and the wind turned their feathers. It was a cold fall and the wind came down from the mountains."

  • Heather Colacurcio
    2019-06-13 03:09

    I debated between the three and four star rating for this one. In terms of Hemingway's storytelling and writing ability it is certainly a four. On the contrary, in terms of how much I enjoyed the content of this book, it is most definitely a three for me. This is the second Hemingway book I've read (after promising myself that I would give each book a chance on it's own before I make my ultimate judgment on him. After tearing through "A Farewell to Arms", I immediately picked up the next Hemingway I found in the library. However, this one took me over a month to read, as I kept going back to it sporadically in between reading other novels. This collection of stories featuring character Nick Adams spans his childhood to the point where he becomes a father. I had a real problem getting through the majority of this book and it no doubt stems from the fact that this is not exactly a novel. Thus, the stories are disjointed and it feels somehow incomplete. While I understand that this is the collected stories of Nick Adams, the way in which Hemingway writes each of these stories seems like it jumps between completely different voices. Overall, not my cup of tea.

  • Alexis
    2019-06-16 19:20

    I’m afraid that short stories are just not Hemingway’s strong suit. One of the amazing things about his novels is the way he gradually adds layer after layer to his characters, slowly exposing their complexity. With the short vignettes here, we don’t have this deep understanding of the characters, so rather than the tension of unspoken emotions behind brusque dialogue, we’re just left with a lot of declarative sentences. That said, some stories worked much better than others. The war stories were the best in the collection; Hemingway excels at writing trauma and fear and frustration. Unfortunately, when dealing with more commonplace subjects, the stories verged on boring.

  • Nolan
    2019-05-25 03:12

    Oh this book just pulls my heart until it hurts. If I ever had a place to call my home town it would be Northern Michigan. Hemingway often wrote about the same area of Northern Michigan where he would spend his summers. These short stories are about growing up there and mentions all the little towns and places I know. I read this book every summer on the airplane when I go back to MI.

  • Emily
    2019-05-25 03:27

    I can now say I'm a true Hemingway fan...my question is if they are all truthful?

  • Mike Williams
    2019-05-26 00:24

    Some stories were okay. Interestingly, the connections between some of the characters here and characters in my Hemingway favorites are sometimes very similar and for that reason, I allowed 3 stars instead of 2. If this were written by anyone other than the great Papa, I would not have finished. I really was not impressed with nor drawn in to many of the stories and had put off this book for years based on summaries I had read in the past. I felt that I needed a dose of Hemingway, so I finally gave it a shot. I should've trusted my intuition. To Have and to Have Not, For Whom the Bell Tolls, A Farewell to Arms, and Islands in the Stream were fantastic, some of my all time favorites, these stories pale in comparison. I felt the same way about Death in the Afternoon and The Sun Also Rises. If for no other reason, I would recommend these to someone who was interested in learning about Hemingway's writing style, because I'm sure these stories give clues into the famed Iceberg Style Hemingway is known for, but for me, I'm not looking for an academic lesson in Literature, just some pleasurable reading with perhaps a light peppering of interesting wisdom or historical facts woven into the story.

  • Mark Fallon
    2019-06-01 00:33

    I was looking for a reintroduction to Hemingway. Fortunately, a friend is a former English professor, and sent me his copy of "The Nick Adams Stories". It was interesting to trace Hemingway's growth as a writer - from his obvious homage to Mark Twain, and later finding his own voice. The trout stream scenes caused a visceral reaction, and I could feel the cool stream rushing against my leg.

  • Riverlee
    2019-06-20 22:35

    I just wonder if in fact Hemingway was the great writer who' changed the style of English prose' or was he just an alcoholic who repeated bits of sentences over and over again? I must say I did enjoy reading the stories though (for the most part). He was definitely a 'man's man." Never really getting the female characters very flushed out or realistic.

  • Beth
    2019-06-11 23:10

    This is the third time I have attempted to say that I never finished this book, sorry Ernie! It was, indeed, fun to read about Northern Michigan a century ago, with so many references, but then, I simply lost interest, maybe 60% through! So many books, so little time, so I moved on!

  • Laura Bacon
    2019-06-07 23:10

    The Nick Adams Stories: A Magnificent CollectionBy: Laura Bacon Ernest Hemingway has been known as one of the most popular American authors to date. he does not fall short in this collection of short stories. Said to The Nick Adams Stories: A Magnificent CollectionBy: Laura Bacon Ernest Hemingway has been known as one of the most popular American authors to date. he does not fall short in this collection of short stories. Said to mirror Hemingway’s own life, The Nick Adams Stories are a collection of one memorable character, Nick Adams, as it follows Nick from a young child to a grown man. Near the end of the collection it came to my attention that Hemingway wanted you to think that Nick himself “wrote” the stories. One of the stories is when Nick witnesses a Native American woman give birth. But later on, Nick says “Of corse he’d never seen an Indian woman having a baby. That was what made it good. Nobody knew that” (Hemingway, 238). It seems that Nick made up the story and who knows what else he could have made up. I found it very interesting that Hemingway did it this way and it shocked me when I read that. I really enjoyed reading these short stories as they were really well written. I would find hidden meanings in every story and it was fun to read and think about what Hemingway actually meant. An overall amazing read and I would recommend it to anyone who was interested in short stories with deeper meaning. Hemingway’s own life, The Nick Adams Stories are a collection of one memorable character, Nick Adams, as it follows Nick from a young child to a grownsman. The collection begins with Nick as a young child. Seeing his relationship with his father and friends. Though the stories themselves are short it reflects on Nick throughout the rest of stories. Then you see Nick as a young man traveling on his own and making his own decisions. Then as a soldier, back home from war, and as a grown adult married with a son. Each story gives you a personal look into Nick’s thoughts and personal life. Near the end of the collection it came to my attention that Hemingway wanted you to think that Nick himself “wrote” the stories. One of the stories is when Nick witnesses a Native American woman give birth. But later on, Nick says “Of corse he’d never seen an Indian woman having a baby. That was what made it good. Nobody knew that” (Hemingway, 238). It seems that Nick made up the story and who knows what else he could have made up. I found it very interesting that Hemingway did it this way and it shocked me when I read that. I really enjoyed reading these short stories as they were really well written. I would find hidden meanings in every story and it was fun to read and think about what Hemingway actually meant. An overall amazing read and I would recommend it to anyone who was interested in short stories with deeper meaning.

  • Paul Cockeram
    2019-06-13 03:09

    Hemingway wrote stories that are good. He chose common words to name the lands of Michigan and the Midwest, he named their rivers and swamps and the fish that swim. He named the trees and hills and the people who hike, both the no-account types working for the government and the honest types just making their way and having a little fun. Sure this book has guns in it and yes many animals were harmed in the making of the stories. But nobody writes with more respect for nature. Nobody else’s stories read like recipes for a spiritual retreat via camping and fishing. Nick Adams is Hemingway’s voice and his stand-in, witness to all the ordeals and high points of life that you and I evade and seek both. Adams struggles with birth and death, sex and violence, love and crime, war and poverty, fatherhood and adolescence. Most of the stories are narrated by someone outside of him, though he speaks a few in first person, and anyway all of the stories are told from his point of view. His desires are remote even from himself, but the emotion is always there even when he tries hardest to hide it or push it aside. These are men’s stories and while the world of women abuts them, it never dominates them or sets their agenda.This collection is also a master class in minimalism. Everything important happens between the lines and underneath the dialogue, the way men spoke in the early twentieth century and the way they continue to speak in certain places. It is a healthy ambiguity, for the most part. The more meaningful the occasion, the less Hemingway is likely to say about it. Any details noted about a wedding or a funeral or a watershed moment between father and son will be peculiar, and they’ll hint at a narrative not present in surface recollections or acted upon in the here and now. But for all that Hemingway knows who we are and why we struggle, and he knows how important the quiet moments between the action are to a healthy psyche.

  • Eddie Hodges
    2019-06-07 23:27

    It's funny, but I've never read a lot of Hemingway's work even though I've really enjoyed that I have read. The Nick Adams Stories is no exception; the writing, the characters, the scenic descriptions, these are all as good as it gets. This collection of short stories, inspired by Hemingways own life, follows a man named Nick Adams from his childhood to an adult man with a child of his own. I came away from this book feeling as though I knew Adams, as well as a few of his associates, personally. In addition, gives a really nice snapshot of America beginning with the 1900s and on up so that I got a sense of what life was like during those times, at least, around the Michigan area of America as well as just outside Chicago and overseas. In one way though the stories were frustrating because the characters of these stories are written so well and so vividly you do feel that you've gotten to know them only for the stories to end, as does life a lot of times, with no resolution to whatever is the focus of the story. It's like getting to know a new neighbor, becoming friends learning of his financial problems, marriage troubles, etc. only to have him move away after a couple of years. You may never hear from him again or may bump into him briefly and get an idea of what happen, but you never really know.Don't let that stop you from reading this though; after all, it's Hemingway and short of Shakespeare writing rarely gets better that that. Hemingway deserved his reputation and The Nick Adams Stories are a good example of how he earned it.

  • Ruth
    2019-05-30 22:34

    Unlike most of Hemingway's writings, I liked this set of stories. Much of his other works are dark or too bohemian for my taste. I have read bits and pieces of the Nick Adams stories, out of sequence, over a number of years but just recently read the entire collection as assembled in this book. Nick Adams, the hero of the stories, some say, is actually Hemingway, as he sees himself. Symbolism can be read into many of the scenes throughout the stories so it isn't a stretch to say that Hemingway is telling his own life story. Case in point is in the Big Two Hearted River where Nick, just home from the war, searches out the quietude of his old fishing spots. Picking his way through the barren landscape where fire had destroyed everything seems to symbolize all the horrors of the war Hemingway just witnessed. Pushing forward, Nick comes to land untouched by the fire... still green and lush... it seems fitting this would represent Hemingway's journey to self renewal.Although Hemingway was a tremendous influence on literature, his subject matter isn't something I enjoy reading. That said, I would recommend this collection of stories.

  • Robert
    2019-06-18 22:34

    What a wonderful way to read these stories; you do appreciate them in a different way in sequence. The biggest surprise was "Last Good Country," an unfinished novella that's kind-of like Hemingway's attempt at a children's adventure story, that he stops writing just before it turns dark. I'd read "Father and Sons" before and it's just as haunting as I remember. It also prove how little was "simple" about Hemingway style. Suicide hangs over the whole thing, without that word ever being used. That story closes out the collection and by the end of it you feel a little hollow and used. And that feels good, I don't know why.Liked this bit from "Last Good Country":'When is a man grown up? When he's married?' 'No. Until you're grown-up they send you to reform school. After you're grown up they send you to the penitentiary.'

  • Justin
    2019-05-26 22:28

    4.5 stars. This is probably one of Hemingway's best books - up there with The Sun Also Rises and For Whom the Bell Tolls. What I love about this collection is that it puts all of the Nick Adams stories in chronological order which provides a lot more context. When you read them in their original collections, they often seem scattered and hard to understand. In this collection you see the synergies between the stories and how actions in one story impact the setting and emotions in another.This collection has all of the elements that you would expect from Hemingway - the spare writing style, the coming of age theme, and the melancholy that tinges all of the characters lives. A couple of these definitely rank in my Top 10 list of short stories. I highly recommend.

  • Zachrobhan
    2019-05-24 19:31

    It never ceases to amaze me the crud that teachers will subject their students to. This was my case in high school. I was forced to write numerous papers talking about how awesome this book was. In reality Ernest Hemingway was a total Eeyore. Everything he writes is depressing and boring. It's crazy that every one applauds him as being such a realist. I feel sorry for anyone who sees life in that way.I guess it's fine if you read a little Hemingway to broaden your horizons. Just be sure to read positive stuff too.

  • Clare
    2019-06-17 03:22

    To be honest, this book was poorly written, aand I would have expected more from such a famous author. The bridging from chapter to chapter was absent, and I often found myself confused. I don't think it has any redeeming qualities, so I stopped reading on about page 270. Worse still, it had so many swear words in every sentence (a VERY colorful vocabulary), that it could give you a heart attack. For a time we had to read it out loud, and we had to beep out words more than talk! I do not recommend it to anyone.

  • Nikki
    2019-06-07 03:29

    It's quite a while since I read these stories (or at least some of them -- Big Two-Hearted River is the one that sticks in my mind) for a class in American Literature of the 1920s. I think my only Hemingway before that may have beenThe Old Man and the Sea which I didn't care for in 7th grade. The stories made me appreciate Hemingway's style much more. I'd say they are a good introduction before reading the novels.

  • Lois
    2019-06-07 22:29

    I found these stories very tedious and self serving; I get that Hemmingway was obsessed with death and manliness but even the glorification of nature in the upper portions of Michigan couldn't capture my attention. Women are undeveloped characters and frankly nothing much happens. I can't believe that one paragraph could constitute a short story; where were the beginning, middle and ends of the tales. What the heck is the significance of the rabbit at the end of "On writing".

  • Meri
    2019-05-26 23:19

    Read it cover to cover for a Hemingway course. "Big Two-Hearted River" is still and always will be my favorite. I've yet to find a more lyrical, serene, heartbreaking short story. But they're all good.

  • Rebecca
    2019-06-01 21:29

    This collection was quite disappointing. It was difficult to sympathize with the main character and many of the tales had no point at all. The descriptions of Nick's love of outdoor life were the only redeeming quality.

  • Cooper Renner
    2019-06-10 01:30

    I read this long ago--late '90s maybe--and enjoyed it. I decided it was time to read it again. I've reread about half and may come back to finish it later, but for now it just doesn't seem as interesting as it did when I was younger.

  • Charles
    2019-05-21 19:11

    I have a paperback copy of this. These are Hemingway's early stories, vital to read for an understanding of his work, but not as developed or as powerful as some of his later stories. Three and a half stars from me.

  • Steve
    2019-05-28 00:09

    I've read many of the Nick Adams stories before, but never in the order as presented in this collection. This collection makes for a fascinating narrative. Nick is a wonderful character and the stories are powerful and understated. It's Hemingway at his absolute best. What more could you ask for?

  • MohamadEqbali
    2019-05-23 03:33

    Well-crafted accounts of his travels deep into American nature and other things. Published posthumously. A personal book for me.