Read Schrödinger's Gun by Ray Wood Online

schrdinger-s-gun

Of all the crime scenes in all the timelines in all the multiverse, Detective O'Harren walks into the basement on West 21st. In every possible universe, Johnny Rivers is dead. But the questions that need answering--who killed him and why--are still a matter of uncertainty....

Title : Schrödinger's Gun
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781466886278
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 32 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Schrödinger's Gun Reviews

  • karen
    2018-10-14 07:37

    In every crime scene every one of me was looking at, he lay face-down on the floor with two bullets in his back.this is a neat little futuristic sci-fi noir story in which crimes can be solved by accessing any number of possible timelines by a detective with a heisen implant stuck in their brain. in this story, we have detective o'harren, a woman working in future-chicago, confronted with a corpse of a bootlegger and mobster called johnny rivers.the story is full of the language of your typical noir:It was one of those drab Chicago winters, the kind where every sunrise brings fresh bodies on the sidewalks.but also full of those brain-boggles that occur when authors get a little frisky with the quantum physics:Other universes closed around me. I clung to the possibility thread that I had plucked out from the throng, visualizing it as a literal rope clutched in my fist. I felt like I was falling—the walls lurched briefly into the ceiling—then all at once I stopped, and I was standing in the basement—just one of them—listening to the faint wash of traffic on the street outside.it's an interesting and thought-provoking little story that playfully subverts the noir genre and also inserts a little emotional drama about the consequences of being able to see not only the future, but a variety of different futures, and how that can really put a strain on a marriage. and it's also got a nice pop of an ending. the whole schrödinger's cat thing is always a fun little mindgame, and can be a fun physical game if you have one of these things that i bought for greg. and while most of the comments on the thread following the story on the tor site seem mind = blown by one of the cool lines in the story, i preferred this one:That’s one thing they don’t tell you about Schrödinger’s cat: you leave the lid on the box too long and the damn thing starves regardless. No quantum possibilities required.but you make up your own mind. read it for yourself here:http://www.tor.com/stories/2015/02/sc...

  • Nataliya
    2018-10-11 13:37

    When Erwin Schrödinger came up with his catchy mockery of the absurdist implications of some quantum mechanics interpretations he likely never even imagined that in the collective mind his memorable example of a cat simultaneously dead and alive¹ until the possibilities are collapsed into a single state by the power of observation would forever become the definite "that's it!" quantum theory postulate. ¹The principle was then realistically expanded in Terry Pratchett's Lords and Ladies:"Technically, a cat locked in a box may be alive or it may be dead. You never know until you look. In fact, the mere act of opening the box will determine the state of the cat, although in this case there were three determinate states the cat could be in: these being Alive, Dead, and Bloody Furious."But the idea of the many possibilities just waiting to be collapsed into one remains catching and, unlike the poor cat, definitely alive, and that's what the short Tor.com story Schrödinger’s Gun capitalizes on - the instant recognition of the principle. It's a determinedly noir story set in the 1930s-feel Chicago full of gangsters and cold crime and moonshine - and also somehow equipped with technology that allows the implantation of a heisen device (immediately leading to the thought of Heisenberg uncertainty principle) into a person's brain, allowing that person to see the endless possibilities spreading out from any event and to grab onto whichever of those possibilities you would like to see happen."Shadows of those possibilities stretched out on either side of us, rows of doppelgangers interviewing and being interviewed, as though Kitty and I were caught between two mirrors."It seems like a great aid to a grim noir detective (who, in the defiance of the noir conventions, is a woman - but after all, it's sci-fi noir with a little less gender biases). It may even seem like a worthy enough personal sacrifice to solve crime - even if it is only in one of the endless possibilities.“Why bother?” he had asked me once. “Even if you bring this guy down now there’s gonna be about a million other universes where he gets away scot free, right?”[...]“Because if I don’t bother,” I said, “he gets away in a million and one.”And personal sacrifice it is indeed. In parallel with the main storyline of the novella focusing on the murder of a Chicago mobster and an accidentally dropped titular gun in the middle of a grim unfriendly winter and the black-and-white film feel of the story there is another narrative line highlighting the isolation of living with a possibilities generation that has become a permanent part of you."My baby girl, my joy, my Sarah—for those first few weeks I couldn’t look at her. Not without seeing a spectrum of all that she could or might or would never be, every glorious and terrifying possibility fanning out around her. I brushed against universes in which I slipped and dropped her off the balcony, or accidentally smothered her beneath a blanket. They were outside chances, but they followed me like specters. Rick was no better. He was suddenly a million different people—Rick if I said this, Rick if I said that; Rick who could fall out or back in love with me a thousand different ways—and I withdrew, not knowing which of him I loved."This story is definitely memorable with its stark contrast between the black-and-white smoke-filled noir tone and the existence of the possibilities-bending technology, wholly unexplained and therefore even more interesting. It's the mixture of vintage and futuristic, and this improbable mixture works improbably exactly like the mass-appealing idea of a cat both alive and dead, leading to the ending that us both frustrating and, of course, completely logically inevitable."That’s one thing they don’t tell you about Schrödinger’s cat: you leave the lid on the box too long and the damn thing starves regardless. No quantum possibilities required."

  • Jokoloyo
    2018-09-20 09:19

    As the title had indicated, there is multi-universe possibilities theme. The story showed it beautifully how to use a technology based on the Erwin Schrödinger's paradox. Without spoiler to the plot, I can only say the ending is great, the strong point of this short story. There is a big potential to enhance the theme into full length novel. Maybe in a universe that already happened. I pity the universes where this story has not been written or published.

  • Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽
    2018-09-21 08:38

    A 1930's film noir type of detective gets an implant in her head (called a heisen) and the universe explodes for her with different possibilities. She can view the same scene in different universes, choose which possibilities to explore, see what clues show up in which universes, and pull a particular universe option into her own reality. This can be a great for solving crimes--even when it's just one more dead mobster--but can wreak havoc with your personal life:My baby girl, my joy, my Sarah—for those first few weeks I couldn’t look at her. Not without seeing a spectrum of all that she could or might or would never be, every glorious and terrifying possibility fanning out around her. I brushed against universes in which I slipped and dropped her off the balcony, or accidentally smothered her beneath a blanket. They were outside chances, but they followed me like specters. Rick was no better. He was suddenly a million different people—Rick if I said this, Rick if I said that; Rick who could fall out or back in love with me a thousand different ways—and I withdrew, not knowing which of him I loved.I experienced my own personal multiverse of possibilities while I was reading this short story:- In one universe I was entranced by the imaginative prose in this story: "Shadows of those possibilities stretched out on either side of us, rows of doppelgangers interviewing and being interviewed, as though Kitty and I were caught between two mirrors."- In one universe I was distracted by trying to figure out how a futuristic surgical implant technology and procedure made its way into 1930's Chicago.- In one universe I was getting a kick out of the application of the Schrödinger’s cat thought experiment to this story.- In one universe I was intrigued by the ambiguous ending. In another I was disappointed by it.- In none of these universes did I regret reading this short story.Free online Tor.com story here.

  • Claudia
    2018-10-04 09:38

    A detective story, set in Chicago, full of cliches. The only interesting part in it was the 'heisen' implant which provided access to all the possible universes at the same time and see the alternatives in an investigation. It also provided insight and multiple choices in the detective's personal life but this thread was not developed enough. The ending was the worst of all the viable endings in all the viable universes...http://www.tor.com/2015/02/18/schroed...

  • Bettie☯
    2018-09-26 15:41

    Description: Of all the crime scenes in all the timelines in all the multiverse, Detective O’Harren walks into the basement on West 21st. In every possible universe, Johnny Rivers is dead. But the questions that need answering--who killed him and why--are still a matter of uncertainty.http://www.tor.com/stories/2015/02/sc...Opening: I could reach no possibilities in which Johnny Rivers—wise guy, bootlegger, crook with his eye on the big time—still clung to life. In every crime scene every one of me was looking at, he lay face-down on the floor with two bullets in his back. It was a pity. Not because Chicago was particularly the worse off for one more dead mobster, but because murders are murders, and solving Johnny’s would have been a whole lot easier if he’d lived long enough to tell me who had pulled the trigger. Maybe, in another universe, another me had shown up sooner and had gotten something out of him.

  • TL
    2018-10-18 12:37

    Of all the crime scenes in all the timelines in all the multiverse, Detective O’Harren walks into the basement on West 21st. In every possible universe, Johnny Rivers is dead. But the questions that need answering—who killed him and why—are still a matter of uncertainty..I could reach no possibilities in which Johnny Rivers—wise guy, bootlegger, crook with his eye on the big time—still clung to life. In every crime scene every one of me was looking at, he lay face-down on the floor with two bullets in his back. It was a pity. Not because Chicago was particularly the worse off for one more dead mobster, but because murders are murders, and solving Johnny’s would have been a whole lot easier if he’d lived long enough to tell me who had pulled the trigger. Maybe, in another universe, another me had shown up sooner and had gotten something out of him.An interesting noir-sort of scifi- type story.. the concept of an implant that shows you dozens of possibilities at a crime scene was a fun one. While I loved the idea, at times I had trouble believing it... wondering how it worked exactly and what happens with the other possibilities in the other timelines/realities. Did solving Johnny's murder in one prevent the crime from happening in the others, or was it still going on?That didn't come exactly how I had it in my head but that's the general idea.The personal stuff about Detective O’Harren felt like an interruption to the flow of the story, I sympathized a little with her... can't imagine how an implant like that would screw with your personal life.The ending was a twist I didn't see coming, intriguing surprise. Makes you wonder what Detective O’Harren would have done.Overall, a well done story... I would recommend it :).Read the story here

  • Derek
    2018-10-13 13:38

    Riveting play on Schrödinger's cat. If a detective can see all potential universes, does it make her job easier? The twist at the end was a complete surprise.

  • MLE
    2018-09-30 07:42

    Interesting in an almost headache inducing way. I love the blending of genres, and ideas in this story. Short, but it feels fully explored, and complete.

  • G33z3r
    2018-10-01 14:43

    Intriguing story idea of a police detective whose "heisen" implant allows her to see multiple possible outcomes and select the one most advantageous to our investigation.It very briefly raise the question of how such vision would affect her personal life, when you can always see both the best, most likely, and worst possible outcomes of every moment. Unfortunately, it didn't really explore that aspect, which seemed like it would be more interesting than the murder mystery she is actually investigating.And, it really could've used a more interesting ending.

  • Jason
    2018-10-01 12:32

    4 Stars This is a great novella that is a great combination of detective noir and a hard physics concept. The Detective O'Harren is likable and she gives us just enough background information to understand what us going on. This is clearly a noir novel, steeped in black and white and smoke. The novel is of course told in the first person.This is a fun read with a cool concept that would make a wonderful full length novel.

  • Elspeth
    2018-09-20 12:25

    Interesting, but the ending didn't really wow me.

  • Laura
    2018-10-05 07:48

    You may read online at Tor.comOpening lines:I could reach no possibilities in which Johnny Rivers—wise guy, bootlegger, crook with his eye on the big time—still clung to life. In every crime scene every one of me was looking at, he lay face-down on the floor with two bullets in his back. It was a pity. Not because Chicago was particularly the worse off for one more dead mobster, but because murders are murders, and solving Johnny’s would have been a whole lot easier if he’d lived long enough to tell me who had pulled the trigger. Maybe, in another universe, another me had shown up sooner and had gotten something out of him.

  • Kate
    2018-10-05 10:32

    I thought this was a great concept, and the writing was very good. I suppose the only reason I didn't rate it higher is because I wasn't completely happy with the story itself. The background stuff about the Detective's ex and child seemed sort of forced in there. And I am often skeptical of Schrodinger's Cat references that don't acknowledge the fact that Schrodinger himself never intended this thought experiment to represent a real possibility. But. I do think the way the potential universes are represented in this story is good. That's just my personal weird pet peeve. This was definitely a good story.

  • Caleb Hill
    2018-09-27 13:29

    Nice little noir short with biting prose, sharper wit, and a look at the aftermath of dwelling too much on what-ifs. Nice ending to boot.Favorite quote: That’s one thing they don’t tell you about Schrödinger’s cat: you leave the lid on the box too long and the damn thing starves regardless. No quantum possibilities required.Highly recommended. 7.5/10

  • Odo
    2018-10-20 14:45

    2.5/5.0

  • Michele
    2018-10-20 14:28

    Un'accattivante commistione tra fantascienza, teoria dei molti mondi e giallo hard-boiled. Davvero godibile.

  • Shona
    2018-09-21 15:25

    More like a 4.5, this story had an almost flawless noir-style voice from the first-person narrator coupled with straightforward world-building, though it's difficul to determine what kind of society this is taking place in (it reminds me a lot of Brandon Sanderson's recent novella Snapshot, where there's one science fiction element in an otherwise contemporary time period). It stayed consistent and we discover about the narrator's heisen implant in a variety of ways as though to make sure we understand the quantum physics behind it (which is sometimes repetitive). Add to this that the mystery plot was well-structured enough to be a taut fit to the format of a short story, and you've got one bomb short-story.

  • Nostalgia Reader
    2018-09-25 15:30

    I saw this pop up on my GR feed one weekend and thought it sounded good so I read it. I absolutely adored the setting--futuristic, but culturally 20s and 40s, although not dieselpunk. The characters were also enjoyable, if a little predictable; I'd love to read a novel with them, so I could get more background. Which was the main problem with this story. There was too much backstory alluded to that I felt was, but wasn't, explained... these tangents seemed pointless to the story, although they did play a big part in foreshadowing, so they were a bit purposeful. And the ending... just didn't do it for me, I'm sorry. There wasn't enough suspenseful build-up to have me surprised and knocked off guard. Despite these "issues", I'd still recommend it if you want a short, historical-dystopian sci-fi read.

  • Amy
    2018-10-11 13:32

    Second story by Wood I've read and I'm impressed again. In this one, a detective has a "heisen implant" that allows her to see how situations play out in different quantum universes. Useful for solving crime because if a person's story is consistent in all possible universes, they are likely telling the truth. Of course, the murder of a gangster isn't that simple.

  • Nove
    2018-10-03 14:29

    Maybe I'm too dumb to get the ending. Or maybe I'm just not convinced of the theory that there are alternate universes out there where different versions of us live. I'll read about that someday and maybe come back to this. Until then, I'm giving this short story three stars.(Anyone is welcome to explain the ending to me...)

  • Marco
    2018-10-16 10:28

    Of all the crime scenes in all the timelines in all the multiverse, Detective O'Harren walks into the basement on West 21st. In every possible universe, Johnny Rivers is dead. But the questions that need answering, who killed him and why, are still a matter of uncertainty.

  • Bethany
    2018-10-20 12:34

    Really incredible short story. You can read it here: http://www.tor.com/stories/2015/02/sc...I really enjoyed the idea of a cop with the ability to choose between possible future realities in order to solve crimes. But mostly the way it was written.Enjoyed very much!

  • Libby Stephenson
    2018-09-21 14:39

    I'm not really into Prohibition-era crime stories, but if its going to be done, this is an enjoyable way of doing it. Sadly, the title kind of gives away the ending.

  • Ellen
    2018-09-28 11:36

    4 stars.

  • Marion
    2018-09-27 07:47

    Too confusing. The "science" aspect of it feels thrown in just to have a cool name for the title.

  • Karyn Kar Mun (Thy Evil Queen)
    2018-10-09 10:31

    A nice piece of writing, lovely to read, but the ending was too predictable to me - I read too many stories about parallel universes lol. Some might find it an interesting twist, though.

  • Basil H
    2018-09-27 13:31

    I wanted to like this so so bad. The science was just so bad. Jeezus. Lack of imagination even.(view spoiler)[And the ending was dumb dumb dumb. (hide spoiler)]

  • Sarah
    2018-10-09 15:31

    Interesting noir detective story that plays with multiverses. I really like the ending.