Read Deeper Water by Robert Whitlow Online

deeper-water

The Tides of Truth novels follow one lawyer's passionate pursuit of truth in matters of life and the law.In the murky waters of Savannah's shoreline, a young law student is under fire as she tries her first case at a prominent and established law firm. A complex mix of betrayal and deception quickly weaves its way through the case and her life, as she uncovers dark and conThe Tides of Truth novels follow one lawyer's passionate pursuit of truth in matters of life and the law.In the murky waters of Savannah's shoreline, a young law student is under fire as she tries her first case at a prominent and established law firm. A complex mix of betrayal and deception quickly weaves its way through the case and her life, as she uncovers dark and confusing secrets about the man she's defending--and the senior partners of the firm. How deep will the conspiracy run? Will she have to abandon her true self to fulfill a higher calling? And how far will she have to go to discover the truth behind a tragic cold case?...

Title : Deeper Water
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781595541321
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 400 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Deeper Water Reviews

  • Michael
    2019-04-21 19:02

    When I first discovered the contemporary Christian legal thrillers by Robert Whitlow, I made the inevitable comparisons between his stories and those of John Grisham. And as the years have gone along, it's been interesting to watch the path both have taken as writers. Neither is cotent to write carbon copies of the same legal thrillers over and over again and instead choose to push themselves and their audiences.Whitlow's last few books have moved out of the legal arena to some extent and focused more on character-building. Now, he brings the lessons learned there to the lessons of his early legal thriller storytelling skills together in "Deeper Waters."Tammy comes from a very conservative Christian home. She was homeschooled until she went to the University of Georgia to study law. She receives an offer for a summer internship at a prestigious Savannah lawfirm and after a lot of debate and prayer decides to take it. One of the first decisions Tammy makes is to change her name's spelling to Tami, to make it look more sophisticated. Interestingly, Tammy chooses to lie to her mother about this when a letter comes to the house addressed to Tami and not the actual spelling of her name.With Tami, Whitlow has set up an interesting example of a person living in the world but not being of the world. But in her journey, Tami is not perfect and, at times, comes across as difficult or irritating. I think a lot of this is deliberately done by Whitlow to help build Tami as an authentic character. And, for the most part, it works effectively in the course of the story.Tami is assigned a case where a man was arrested for tying his boat up on the piers of some of Savannah's richer homes. But as she digs, Tami discovers the man needs more than just legal representation. Something more is lurking here, just below the surface. Tami's decision to pursue it could cost her not only her internship but her potential future as a member of the legal profession.Meanwhile, Tami is being pursued by two of her co-workers at the lawfirm. One is her "boss" and the other is a fellow intern. Both have positives and negatives and watching as Tami wavers between the two and whether she wants to date either makes for an interesting sidestory and sets up a minor cliffhanger to ensure you'll come back for the next book.Given her background, it's interesting to watch how Tami reacts to the world. Whitlow's great strength is that he's able to take the Christian walk and make it feel authentic to his characters. No one is drawn in shades of black and white and it's not predictable who will or won't be "saved" in the course of the story. Whitlow instead creates characters and explores their paths. Some may be won, some may stray, but they'll always be interesting to read about.

  • Susan Snodgrass
    2019-04-28 21:48

    I've read and own several of Robert Whitlow's books and this one had been in my 'to read' basket for several years. Shame on me for not reading it sooner!Deeper Water was absolutely outstanding.Tammy Lynn is a second year law student, with very deeply held convictions about her Christian faith. She gets a job offer from a very prestigious law firm in Savannah to clerk for the summer. She understands that her beliefs will probably be held in scorn, but resolves to remain steadfast in her faith.She soon realizes that she must hold even faster to those beliefs when she has a practice case to try with longstanding concerns. Will Tammy be up to the challenge? What will her convictions mean for her?This is a wonderful novel, in the same vein as John Grisham, only much better. There is one scene in this book that makes the entire book worth reading.

  • Rachel Thompson
    2019-04-29 15:49

    I feel a little bad giving this book two stars -- I managed to finish it, and there were parts I genuinely liked, but overall the book has some glaring issues that make it just okay. I know I will not be seeking other books by this author.Going into this, I was expecting a courtroom drama, which I'm not a big fan of, but I downloaded this book for free, so I thought I'd give it a shot. I really was not expecting a Christian courtroom drama. I can handle a few Christian books, but this one is really heavy on the religious aspect.Tami is a law student from Georgia who comes from a super conservative family. Women should never show too much skin, and must always wear dresses. For some reason, Tami is also a basketball player, so she can wear shorts to play the game, but they have to be specially made to cover her knees. Oh, and she can wear sweat pants for her early morning jogs. ??? While fitness is important, I don't understand why this is allowed since it seems like there are certain roles and rules for women and men. Anyway, before doing anything she has to pray about it. And usually she also needs her parents permission -- though they also have to pray about it. It's amazing anything ever gets decided. Luckily for Tami, they approve her going off to the big city of Savannah to become a clerk for a law firm, but she seems to rub people the wrong way. She makes friends with a Jewish girl, but can't promise not to try to convert her to Christianity. This, in my mind, is the worst kind of Christian. Why can't people believe whatever they want to? Tami draws the interest of two men who also work there, creating a mild little love triangle -- don't worry, this doesn't really cause any tension, though I just found out that this is the first book of a trilogy, so perhaps there will be more tension later. It's amazing that these two men also happen to be Christians, and are completely comfortable talking about their faith. Lucky Tami.This book really beats you over the head with Christianity. The first part especially is really preachy, which almost made me stop reading. The courtroom drama aspect is completely unbelievable. Tami doesn't handle herself much like a law student, let alone a lawyer, and her big case leads to an even bigger unsolved murder. (view spoiler)[Even though this is really the biggest draw in the book, this story arc fizzles out in a big way when one of the alleged conspirators reveals the truth, and praises Tami for the way she stands up to him. Gag.(hide spoiler)]My biggest complaint about this book arrives at the end, when Tami is telling her mother which young man she'd like to invite home for a weekend...only the reader doesn't find out. So frustrated. But of course, I have no interest in continuing with this series, so I'll probably never find out who Tami chooses. Seriously? The author couldn't have bothered wrapping up that one little plot hole? This book was one big annoyance.

  • Ginger
    2019-04-19 17:44

    While I typically love Whitlow's books, the main character in this one was hard to get to know and to even like. Her responses in the professional arena to her bosses and mentors were that which would have gotten her fired. She seemed spoiled and immature to me. Because of this, it was less believeable to me than some of the other Witlow books. It was an easy, quick read, but not one of my favorites.

  • Jenny Rose
    2019-05-03 15:45

    Deeper Water by Robert Whitlow is book one of the Tides of Truth series. This is the first Whitlow book I've read and I came across it as a free kindle download via the Vessel Project.Tammy Lynn Taylor is from a devout Christian family with some rather strict beliefs: females wear dresses and skirts below the knee, no makeup except on rare and special occasions, children must consult their parents for decisions, and the Sabbath is strictly reserved for resting. She was homeschooled until high school when she was allowed to attend the public high school and play sports while wearing very modest sports uniforms. As a second or third year law student, she is preparing for an internship of sorts.Moses Jones lives in a shack on the Ogeechee River. When he goes fishing, he sees faces in the water. He wonders why they haunt him so and when they will pull him under with them.Normally I don’t care for a female main character, but Robert Whitlow has done an excellent job of not only creating memorable characters but also mystery and suspense. I became so emotionally wrapped up in the story that I wanted to sit down and talk to some of the characters and I cried through the last two chapters. Tammy, though in her second or third year of college, came across as much younger, but I’m sure that is due to her family’s beliefs and convictions and the more I read the more I could relate. While in some ways she comes across as shy and timid, at others, especially when her convictions are on the line, she has steadfast confidence. Though I find it hard to believe that a law firm would manage to take on 3 such religious summer clerks, I am not surprised that two rather different Christian men (Zach and Vince) would find her attractive. Moses and Tammy’s paths cross when Judge Cannon assigns each summer clerk with a misdemeanor case. Moses Jones is accused of twenty-four counts of trespassing. As she researches the charges, she discovers connections between Moses Jones and one of the partners of the law firm, Joe Carpenter and an unsolved missing child case. Zach Mays, her supervising lawyer, cautions against digging any deeper than the relevant charges. Vince Colbert, a fellow summer clerk, passes along any info he stumbles across, including warning her that he has overheard the partners talking about her and her case. Tammy believes that God put her in that law firm with that case to uncover the unresolved death of a little girl from years ago and to tie up the loose ends, even if it means the end of her career and possibly her life.This is one of the few Christian fiction books I have read that was not overly preachy except what fit each of the characters. While the main character is a young woman and two men are attracted to her, romance is kept as a shadow in the background. Whitlow’s knack for mystery and suspense are fantastic—one of the best Christian mystery/suspense I have ever read. I will definitely be reading the next one in this series and will look for more books by Robert Whitlow.

  • LadyCalico
    2019-05-02 20:54

    Is this the worst book Whitlow has ever written or just his most poorly drawn and ridiculously unbelievable protagonist? The book is over half done before the plot even begins to thicken. Most of the first half (and much of the second) is about the boring, endless angst of a ridiculously whiny, self-absorbed, immature brat, who is supposedly a good Christian even though she is all self-righteousness and without grace. She is supposedly in second-year law school and taking her first summer clerkship, yet we are supposed to believe that she has somehow managed to be an A student without having any concept whatsoever about what the actual practice of law entails and has no idea what lawyers do, nor for whom (gosh, like lawyers have to talk to criminals and divorced people!) The excuse for all her faults and failings is that she was homeschooled in grade school which froze her at a 13-year old level of maturity, emotional lability, and melodramatic over-reactions and even though she has supposedly gone through public high school, college and some graduate school, she has been unable to learn or grow in the last 10 years. We are expected to believe her over-protective parents trusted her judgment enough to let her go to college, law school, work in a distant city, and take care of a frail elderly woman, yet still can't trust her judgment about what clothes she wears or what church to attend. She not only carries the Biblical log in her eye, but also a bigger one on her shoulder, looking to take offense at the tiniest of stimuli so she can go all holier-than-thou on any unfortunate in her path, so when she isn't whining about being persecuted, she is steaming-eared mad about nonsense. Of course, Miss All-that imagines every man to be crazy in lust for her and just waiting for a chance to assault her. Somehow the author expects us to believe that someone this prickly and priggish actually has two desirable men who are interested in her, as if a nice Christian man cannot tell the difference between a Proverbs 31 woman and this sad parody of a Pharisee baptized in battery acid. Somehow, this personality alone is supposed to be interesting and sympathetic enough to carry most of the book--NOT. According to this author being a good Christian girl means being juvenile, petty, emotionally labile, defensive, self-centered, self-righteous, Pharisaical, smug, paranoid, and just plain rude and expects us to admire such a "heroine." I don't know (or care) which unfortunate suitor will end up stuck with this walking misery, but they are both way too good for her. I gave the book an extra star because it finally got around to an OK courtroom drama in the last quarter of the book. The main character and the rest of the book really sucked sewer water.

  • Laura
    2019-05-04 20:52

    I have never read anything by Robert Whitlow so I was wondering what I would find. Then I start it and find out the main character is a young woman in law school who was homeschooled by her mother until high school. And she was raised in a very conservative religious environment with a faith that is very real and very practical. Turns out the story is good, too![return][return]The setting is Georgia. First the western part where Tammy Lynn's family lives. Then Savannah where she gets a job as a summer clerk. The law story was interesting, and the law firm environment was well portrayed, even the other summer clerks. There are differences, but it isn't one Christian girl among an entire cast of heathens. There are differing levels of faith, different types of faith, and folks with enough money to think they don't need faith.[return][return]The story is told from Tammy's perspective. We learn a lot about her and we see the other characters developed through her eyes. This means we don't always know what their motives are, but even then I came to a few different conclusions from Tammy when deciding who to trust and how sincere some people were.[return][return]There is more room for growth and development in this series. I have not read much Christian fiction outside of Francine Rivers, but I have heard some common concerns with the lack of plot or believable characters. I found this a very believable book, watching a woman who is growing in her faith and learning to stand on her own with a firm foundation laid by her parents, and a family turning to God for the strength and wisdom to let her grow.

  • Katerina
    2019-04-28 20:03

    I had a difficult time getting into Deeper Water. :) The protagonist, Tami Taylor, was raised in a very conservative (dresses only), Christian, home-schooling family. As a home-schooling mom, I am probably overly sensitive to stereotypes of the home-school community. In this case the family was presented very positively, and Tami’s strict upbringing played an important role in the story. The author, Robert Whitlow, introduces her to another conservative Christian with a completely different background (Christian communes). These elements were in the background as Tami, a second year law student, interns at a prominent law firm and finds evidence of wrong-doing. The story is enjoyable, but I found the background ideas of how different people can live out a strong faith to be the most thought provoking. As one would expect from most Christian authors, there was no objectionable scenes or language. I would rate the book G although it probably wouldn’t grab the interest of anyone younger than a teen.

  • Janet
    2019-05-13 22:38

    Bleh. Quite lame. I think the author intended to show some sort of maturation of the main character, but it really did not manifest. Plus, I just found her (the main character's) religious fundamentalism to be so hypocritical (which is usually true of fundamentalists). For instance, she and her family are against lawsuits, for biblical reasons, but then she goes to law school? And she had double standards concerning her interactions with the two "love interests" (you could barely call them that). If the author was trying to portray devout Christians as boring automatons without personalities, he succeeded. I honestly don't know what he was going for there. And the mystery? Pfft. I admit it was the ONLY thing that kept me reading, because I wanted to find out what happened after reading the opening chapter, but it was so not worth finishing this book.I need to stop writing, because part of me wants to just dissect every page of this book to point out its innumerable flaws, but I have already wasted enough time on it!

  • Cindi Walls
    2019-04-22 21:02

    Enjoyed this book, ready for the next one by Whitlow.

  • Pamela Poole
    2019-05-07 17:59

    I was really hooked on this book from the opening pages, then it slowed down and I wondered if I really had time to keep at it. But I really like this author and wanted to give the book a chance, and I really wanted to resolve what was happening in the opening scene with Moses. While I think some of the descrptions of family life that made the beginning sluggish could have been shortened, I'm sure the author was trying to help readers understand Tami's background so we'd grasp the strict life she's brought up in as it affects how she interacts with the world.As a Christian, I related to the times she was snubbed or teased for her faith. I suspect as the series moves forward, she's going to find more freedom within the Bible's passages than she thought, and there are a few people who will gently lead her to discover it. In this story, she has to make some big mistakes to learn that she needs all sides to a story before coming to the truth of the matter. However, as usual, God is able to turn mistakes into good, as He does in her situation. I admired that she genuinely cares for other people and sees them as open doors and ministries in her life. There is a lot in the interactions with the characters for readers to thoughtfully apply to their own lives.I like stories that aren't gushy and syrupy sweet like a lot of Christian women's fiction, and don't have offensive language, and don't glorify bad behavior, so this author fits my tastes. I ordered the next 2 books in the series and look forward to following Whitlow's creativity for Tami's summer in Savannah.

  • Brandy
    2019-05-13 21:52

    I think this is the first book of a series called "Tides of Truth." This is not one of the usual mystery/legal mystery/thriller books at all, but it has its own charm. The protagonist, Tammy Lynn Taylor, is a devout Southern Christian who belongs to a religious sect that requires their children to be homeschooled, and whose parents inform her every personal decision through praryer. She is old enough to be in college, and it was decided that her career path would be in law. The summer before her third year of law school, she applies for several clerk positions in various law firms in Georgia, and one several hours away from her home sends their request for her to work as a paid intern. After much prayer, her family agrees that she should go to gain legal experience and because they think it is a divine appointment. There, "Tami" (as she goes by because it appears more professional), learns a lot, not just about the law, but about how the strength of her personal convictions can assist her in the most harrowing of circumstances. As I said, not a book that I would normally read, considering its religious slant, but one that I quite enjoyed despite it being just a little preachy in some areas.

  • Phyllis Wheeler
    2019-05-15 19:42

    Robert Whitlow is a practicing attorney who likes to write novels. This book begins a series called Tides of Truth, set in Georgia and focusing on the character Tami Taylor, the product of a fiercely conservative homeschooling family that lives in the boonies. Tami is a law student who takes a summer clerkship at a law firm in Savannah, aware that her ideas on keeping the sabbath and how a woman should dress may alienate fellow workers.At the law firm, she assists on a case involving a marsh dweller, Moses Jones, who apparently guards a dark secret concerning the death of a 10-year-old girl 40 years before. Moses is simply accused of trespassing, not murder. But she determines to get to the bottom of the matter, though it may cost her her legal career. Meanwhile, two men at the firm are interested in her romantically. Will she choose one? If so, which one?I enjoyed this book, especially the characters, drawn in great detail and ringing true. It’s a coming of age book I suppose, with Tami learning to make some Godly decisions for herself, rather than relying on conferring with her parents about everything. Moses takes a faith journey with a satisfying ending.

  • A Leisure Moment
    2019-05-15 14:41

    In reading the works of Whitlow, I always find the common thread that has drawn me to each of his novels thus far. From the very first pages of “Deeper Water ” there is an unusual story inserted that made me question it’s significance to the novel in its entirety . Whitlow paints such a vivid picture of the main character, a young law student, as well as the other characters, that it becomes increasingly difficult to put the book down. The fact that Robert Whitlow is an attorney as well as a Christian is reflected in this novel. I highly recommend to you “Deeper Water ” for your reading enjoyment.Read more reviews and other bookish things on A Leisure Moment!

  • rjp316
    2019-04-30 18:55

    I had never read a Whitlow book and was surprised about by this one – it was a great easy enjoyable read. I really liked the main character, Tami, who is starting to venture out into the world and leave the safety of her parents behind (although she was in college already she is now taking her first job/internship). She must now make decisions for herself based on her faith. I liked her “coming of age” transformation and realizing that although she can still ask for her parents advise she does not need to tell them everything or seek there direction on everything. However some of her behavior especially at work did not seem appropriate nor within her character. I loved the description of Savannah and the south –makes we want to go and visit. Two other characters – Mrs. Fairmont and Moses were great and really showed Tami’s compassion and empathy for others. This is book one of a two book deal so definately would be getting the next book, "Higher Hope", to see how Tami's life evolves.

  • Theresa
    2019-04-19 17:46

    It is in the tradition of a Christian Grisham. I hate to sound like a literature snob, but this is one of the few modern day fiction writers whom I have read lately that writes well. I couldn't put it down and that is saying a lot. A homeschooled female from a very strict church makes her way through law school and into a summer clerkship for a firm in Savannah, GA. She must face difficult choices in her professional and personal life.My only quibble (other than the fact that a family and church this strict would not have allowed a woman to pursue a career, never mind one in the law) is the fact that sometimes she rushes to judgement and this is only lightly addressed without any real consequences on her part.You can hold to your principles and your truth without everyone else being less than you are.

  • Sweetthingpdx
    2019-04-27 14:35

    From the very first pages, I found myself strangely fascinated by this novel. Although the plot definitely lags and I wondered if/when it would "thicken", by the time it finally did, I was thanking the author for giving me extra time to acclimate to Tami's religion-based ethnocentricism, her subsequent decision-making style and plethora quandaries that ensue. Watching Tami develop as a human being and a woman was inspiring as she did so in a way that garnered (eventual) respect from her peers, but more importantly, honored her upbringing. The pace of the book allows time to "grow" with her. So, I too was frustrated by the ending. After having spent time "growing" with Tami, I was ready for a test of that character growth. I guess I'll have to read the next book in the series....

  • Karol
    2019-04-22 20:51

    Courtroom dramas are one of my favorite genres, ever since I became acquainted with Perry Mason (through TV reruns) many years ago.Tammy Lynn Taylor, the main character in this book, is passionate about the law and is very strongly convicted about her religious faith. I found the conflict between her family and church's teaching, and the "real world" of a Savannah law firm intriguing as she found the right balance that seemed to work for her.The case itself had a "surprise" ending that somehow didn't surprise me. Let's just say that when suspicions run wild, they tend to be wrong - in fiction, apparently, as is true in life.

  • Trish
    2019-04-27 15:57

    It was hard to like the character, Tammy Lynn, in the beginning of the book. It wasn't until I realized that this was a series, did I understand why the author spent so much time developing the character in the beginning. To me, it was a slow read. I like action adventures and this had very little action. I will probably read the next book in this series. Tami grew on my a little bit at the end of the book. I liked her spunk and determination.

  • Rebecca
    2019-05-03 15:38

    I like this author, mostly because I like non-scary mysteries, so lawyer thrillers fit the bill. To read about a character with uncompromising faith coupled with an uncompromising lifestyle is somewhat uncomfortable. Is it feeling convicted that my own thought life should be more pure? Maybe so. Again, with the author, I don't think that most readers could relate unless they'd been exposed to multiple Christian belief systems and lifestyles.

  • Linda Davey
    2019-05-15 15:05

    W

  • Sarah
    2019-04-24 21:56

    This book about a homeschool in a law office was really, really good. I can see why my mom has been on my case to read this series for a while. I plan to start book two very soon.

  • Chris
    2019-05-12 16:55

    Found a new fav author. Loved it. Can't wait till the next one:-)Tammy comes from a very conservative Christian home. She was homeschooled until she went to the University of Georgia to study law. She receives an offer for a summer internship at a prestigious Savannah lawfirm and after a lot of debate and prayer decides to take it. One of the first decisions Tammy makes is to change her name's spelling to Tami, to make it look more sophisticated. Interestingly, Tammy chooses to lie to her mother about this when a letter comes to the house addressed to Tami and not the actual spelling of her name.With Tami, Whitlow has set up an interesting example of a person living in the world but not being of the world. But in her journey, Tami is not perfect and, at times, comes across as difficult or irritating. I think a lot of this is deliberately done by Whitlow to help build Tami as an authentic character. And, for the most part, it works effectively in the course of the story.Tami is assigned a case where a man was arrested for tying his boat up on the piers of some of Savannah's richer homes. But as she digs, Tami discovers the man needs more than just legal representation. Something more is lurking here, just below the surface. Tami's decision to pursue it could cost her not only her internship but her potential future as a member of the legal profession.Meanwhile, Tami is being pursued by two of her co-workers at the lawfirm. One is her "boss" and the other is a fellow intern. Both have positives and negatives and watching as Tami wavers between the two and whether she wants to date either makes for an interesting sidestory and sets up a minor cliffhanger to ensure you'll come back for the next book.Given her background, it's interesting to watch how Tami reacts to the world. Whitlow's great strength is that he's able to take the Christian walk and make it feel authentic to his characters. No one is drawn in shades of black and white and it's not predictable who will or won't be "saved" in the course of the story. Whitlow instead creates characters and explores their paths.**Tammy Lynn Taylor is from a devout Christian family with some rather strict beliefs: females wear dresses and skirts below the knee, no makeup except on rare and special occasions, children must consult their parents for decisions, and the Sabbath is strictly reserved for resting. She was homeschooled until high school when she was allowed to attend the public high school and play sports while wearing very modest sports uniforms. As a second or third year law student, she is preparing for an internship of sorts.Moses Jones lives in a shack on the Ogeechee River. When he goes fishing, he sees faces in the water. He wonders why they haunt him so and when they will pull him under with them.Normally I don’t care for a female main character, but Robert Whitlow has done an excellent job of not only creating memorable characters but also mystery and suspense. I became so emotionally wrapped up in the story that I wanted to sit down and talk to some of the characters and I cried through the last two chapters. Tammy, though in her second or third year of college, came across as much younger, but I’m sure that is due to her family’s beliefs and convictions and the more I read the more I could relate. While in some ways she comes across as shy and timid, at others, especially when her convictions are on the line, she has steadfast confidence. Though I find it hard to believe that a law firm would manage to take on 3 such religious summer clerks, I am not surprised that two rather different Christian men (Zach and Vince) would find her attractive. Moses and Tammy’s paths cross when Judge Cannon assigns each summer clerk with a misdemeanor case. Moses Jones is accused of twenty-four counts of trespassing. As she researches the charges, she discovers connections between Moses Jones and one of the partners of the law firm, Joe Carpenter and an unsolved missing child case. Zach Mays, her supervising lawyer, cautions against digging any deeper than the relevant charges. Vince Colbert, a fellow summer clerk, passes along any info he stumbles across, including warning her that he has overheard the partners talking about her and her case. Tammy believes that God put her in that law firm with that case to uncover the unresolved death of a little girl from years ago and to tie up the loose ends, even if it means the end of her career and possibly her life.

  • Laura
    2019-05-17 21:57

    This is my first book by this author, published in 2008 what a great book with interesting characters. Tami, who is entering the world of becoming a Lawyer, is leaving the support of her family where she had been home schooled and relied on her parents for direction. Now out in the world she must relied on her faith as she work in an office which is filled with mostly worldly people in terms of how they approach each case. Her case was to represent Moses a man who lived on a boat which he tied up at the various homeowners docks. She has found living arrangements with an elderly woman there in the Savannah area. I loved how she interacted with Mrs. Fairmont who lived alone in a large house with visits from her daughter, having a dog for a companion. Tami’s homeschooling could have become a problem but being comfortable with herself and knowing the support of her family fitted in without compromising her home training. The trail for Moses had so many twists and turns that I just wanted to hear more about this man who talked to himself. Representing him with her compassion brought out lots of interesting things not only about Moses but some of the partners in the firm. Looking forward to reading more of this author's books.

  • Beth
    2019-05-07 19:01

    A fairly good mystery with an interesting main character whose religious beliefs guide her through out the novel. Robert Whitlow paints an extremely visual story that does not suffer from "too much" wordiness. The thread of religious ideology that runs through the story is not "preachy" but gives the reader insight as to the main characters action. I also appreciated the fact that the main character does not "fall" from her beliefs as she traverses a world very different from the one in which she grew up.

  • Chuck
    2019-05-11 17:37

    Reading this book really inspired me. I could hardly put it down. Read this book before reading the 2nd and 3rd books in the trilogy. I just finished reading #2 and it built on this book. I predict that you'll love and be inspired reading both these books. I'm on to book #3.

  • Mary
    2019-05-10 19:50

    Overall quite an enjoyable read. The ultra-orthodox Christian themes may be very off putting for some but when pushed to the side the story was quite good. If I come across more by this writer I will certainly give them a go.

  • Linda
    2019-05-19 17:41

    This is my least favorite so far of Whitlow's books. 3.5 starsI probably won't read more in this particular series.

  • Brian O'Leary
    2019-05-14 20:00

    Good characters, but it gets too bogged down in religion.

  • Jerry
    2019-05-17 21:47

    I enjoyed this book, and the protagonist was very likable, yet complex.