Read Witchcraft and Whigs: The Life of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1660-1739) by Andrew Sneddon Online

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This ground-breaking biography of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1669-1739) provides a detailed and rare portrait of an early eighteenth century Irish bishop and witchcraft theorist. Drawing upon a wealth of printed primary source material, the book aims to increase our understanding of the eighteenth-century established clergy, both in England and Ireland.  It illustrates howThis ground-breaking biography of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1669-1739) provides a detailed and rare portrait of an early eighteenth century Irish bishop and witchcraft theorist. Drawing upon a wealth of printed primary source material, the book aims to increase our understanding of the eighteenth-century established clergy, both in England and Ireland.  It illustrates how one of the main skeptical texts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the "Historical Essay Concerning Witchcraft" (1718), was constructed and how it fit into the wider intellectual and literary context of the time, examining Hutchinson’s views on contemporary debates concerning modern prophecy and miracles, demonic and Satanic intervention, the nature of Angels and hell, and astrology.This book will be of particular interest to academics and students in the areas of history of witchcraft, and the religious, political and social history of Britain and Ireland in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries.  ...

Title : Witchcraft and Whigs: The Life of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1660-1739)
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ISBN : 9780719076121
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 232 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Witchcraft and Whigs: The Life of Bishop Francis Hutchinson (1660-1739) Reviews

  • Margaret Sankey
    2019-03-11 12:30

    All right, I know that you're Irish, but as your new bishop, I have to tell you that there is no such thing as witches, or faeries, or curses, and that the law of Great Britain has no provision for prosecuting you if you put the "evil eye" on your neighbor's cow. The only people who believe such nonsense are New Englanders, and You Know How They Are. It is the year 1719, and we live in a rational and enlightened society, and the Church of England declares that while Witchcraft is not evil, it is, well, tacky.