Read The Cristero Rebellion: The Mexican people between church and state, 1926-1929 by Jean Meyer Online

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The Cristero movement is an essential part of the Mexican Revolution. When in 1926 relations between Church and state, old enemies and old partners, eventually broke down, when the churches closed and the liturgy was suspended, Rome, Washington and Mexico, without ever losing their heads, embarked upon a long game of chess. These years were crucial, because they saw the seThe Cristero movement is an essential part of the Mexican Revolution. When in 1926 relations between Church and state, old enemies and old partners, eventually broke down, when the churches closed and the liturgy was suspended, Rome, Washington and Mexico, without ever losing their heads, embarked upon a long game of chess. These years were crucial, because they saw the setting up of the contemporary political system. The state established its omnipotence, supported by a bureaucratic apparatus and a strong privileged class. Just at the moment when the state thought that it was finally supreme, at the moment at which it decided to take control of the Church, the Cristero movement arose, a spontaneous mass movement, particularly of peasants, unique in its spread, its duration, and its popular character. For obvious reasons, the existing literature has both denied its reality and slandered it....

Title : The Cristero Rebellion: The Mexican people between church and state, 1926-1929
Author :
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ISBN : 9780521210317
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 260 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Cristero Rebellion: The Mexican people between church and state, 1926-1929 Reviews

  • Linda Nichols
    2019-03-04 15:23

    If you are interested in Mexico and its history, this is a must-read. It's an under-explored part of the nation's history, one that to me was helpful in understanding this great country to our south, especially important to those of us who live in Texas, which shares the longest border with Mexico. When the Mexican government shut down the Catholic Church and refused to allow services or sacraments to be delivered, the peasants rose up in revolt and fought three years for their right to church services. They were led in part by some priests and bishops, and sheltered their parish priests. It was a rebellion aided by their women and even children. Though they ultimately lost the rebellion, their struggle did have some positive effects in the country and the church. I recommend this book as informative reading about Mexico.