Read Under a Bilari Tree I Born by Alice Bilari Smith Anna Vitenbergs Loreen Brehaut Online

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Bringing up nine children of your own is a major achievement in itself. Bringing up a further 15 foster children is truly remarkable. Alice Bilari Smith had lived in the Pilbara all her life, on stations and in the bush, on government reserves and in towns. As a girl on Rocklea Station she narrowly avoided removal from her family by “the Welfare.” She grew up in the ways oBringing up nine children of your own is a major achievement in itself. Bringing up a further 15 foster children is truly remarkable. Alice Bilari Smith had lived in the Pilbara all her life, on stations and in the bush, on government reserves and in towns. As a girl on Rocklea Station she narrowly avoided removal from her family by “the Welfare.” She grew up in the ways of her country, hunting, cooking, and building in the traditional manner. Some of her children were born in the bush, others in the hospital. By the time she had five children of her own she was playing an active role in caring for other Aboriginal children, and she initiated the establishment of the Homemakers Centre in Roebourne. Both a remarkable life and a typical life, Alice’s story is insightful and inspiring....

Title : Under a Bilari Tree I Born
Author :
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ISBN : 9781925162103
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 240 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Under a Bilari Tree I Born Reviews

  • Robyn
    2019-02-20 04:15

    'Under a Bilari Tree I born' by Alice Bilari Smith piqued my interest as I lived in Roebourne for several years in the late 1980s. As the book indicates Roebourne in the late 1980s was shocking, dysfunctional and sad. This biography, though, is a fantastic insight into indigenous lives and politics in Western Australia. Written in the singsong, lyrical English voice of Alice Bilari Smith, her story is affecting and insightful. It introduces non-indigenous Australia to the complex culture and relationships of indigenous people. It doesn't attempt to romanticise the culture just tells Alice Bilari's life story.This book should be on every Australian school curriculum.