Read Channel Shore: From the White Cliffs to Land's End by Tom Fort Online

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The English Channel is the busiest waterway in the world. Ferries steam back and forth, trains thunder through the tunnel. The narrow sea has been crucial to our development and prosperity. It helps define our notion of Englishness, as an island people, a nation of seafarers. It is also our nearest, dearest playground where people have sought sun, sin and bracing breezes.The English Channel is the busiest waterway in the world. Ferries steam back and forth, trains thunder through the tunnel. The narrow sea has been crucial to our development and prosperity. It helps define our notion of Englishness, as an island people, a nation of seafarers. It is also our nearest, dearest playground where people have sought sun, sin and bracing breezes. Tom Fort takes us on a fascinating, discursive journey from east to west, to find out what this stretch of water means to us and what is so special about the English seaside, that edge between land and seawater. He dips his toe into Sandgate's waters, takes the air in Hastings and Bexhill, chews whelks in Brighton, builds a sandcastle in Sandbanks, sunbathes in sunny Sidmouth, catches prawns off the slipway at Salcombe and hunts a shark off Looe. Stories of smugglers and shipwreck robbers, of beachcombers and samphire gatherers, gold diggers and fossil hunters abound....

Title : Channel Shore: From the White Cliffs to Land's End
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781471129728
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 448 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Channel Shore: From the White Cliffs to Land's End Reviews

  • Bettie☯
    2019-05-22 07:15

    BOTWhttp://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b05vw...Description: Tom Fort's maritime journey, abridged by Katrin Williams, takes us from the White Cliffs to Lands' End. About 675 miles in all.. 1. Where exactly do the North Sea and the English Channel merge,and what did Noel Coward get up to at St. Margaret's? 2. Wandering the 'shabby end' of the Royal Parade in Eastbourne, whichhouses the fishing fleet, the author is reminded of his own fishing exploits.This involved prawn - hunting.. 3. Once upon a time on Cogden Beach near Chesil, 'a mermaid was thrown up by the sea, thirteen feet long'. 4. At Slapton Ley there are musings on Pallas sand grouse, ship-wrecks,and 'Cornish sardines' - whose numbers turned the water black fromLands' End to Bigbury bay. 5. The Looes. Then Lizard Point. Then Land's End, where a cream tea is enjoyed, but the place itself?Reader Jonathan Coy

  • The Book Queen
    2019-05-04 03:59

    When I read non-fiction, I'd like it to feel like I'm reading a story. I have no interest in reading a wall of information, but if the subject matter comes to life, if the people and places explored are as exciting and thought-provoking as they should be in a novel, if the writing flows smoothly, then for me, non-fiction is perfectly enjoyable - because it feels like it isn't non-fiction at all.This book is not like that. This book is non-fiction at its worst: facts and dates recited monotonously in an endless rinse-and-repeat formula that looks a little like this:1. Discuss the history of the town/village/house.2. Gripe about property developers who ruin everything (true, but is it really necessary to complain about them at every single place he visits?)3. Discuss the uselessness of the local council.4. Complain about the National Trust.5. And repeat, on and on, for the entire book.See why I gave it two stars? It's dull. So incredibly dull.Once it got into Devon it was a little more interesting, but that doesn't really make up for 250 pages of extreme boredom. 2.5 stars.

  • Penny
    2019-05-21 10:08

    2.5I quite liked this book in the main, but it could have been a whole lot better. The idea is very promising - a journey along the Channel Shore from east to west, mainly by bicycle. This way Fort feels he can really get to grips with the places he passes through, giving us some local and social history, making conversation with the locals and just generally commenting on what he sees and feels. However, it didn't take me long to get thoroughly fed up with Fort's constant snipes and gripes about the National Trust. Whilst I don't consider it the most perfect of organisations maybe Fort should remember that if it didn't exist he wouldn't have been able to travel along a fraction of the coast he so easily (and freely) accessed. Instead he'd have been confronted with either constant housing conurbations or 'Private, Keep Out' signs. We are extremely fortune that so much of our coastline, not just along the Channel Shore, is protected by the NT for us all to enjoy.His description of what he considers the characteristics of a National Trust Volunteer was nothing but a lazy stereotype - and verged on being just plain offensive although no doubt it was supposed to be amusing. It wasn't.There were lots of black and white photographs in the book but they were small and often taken from high above, meaning that basically it could have been a bit of sea and sand and a few boats almost anywhere!

  • Laura
    2019-05-20 10:08

    From BBC Radio 4 - Book of the Week:Tom Fort's maritime journey, abridged by Katrin Williams, takes us fromthe White Cliffs to Lands' End. About 675 miles in all..1. Where exactly do the North Sea and the English Channel merge,and what did Noel Coward get up to at St. Margaret's?Reader Jonathan Coy

  • Louise Culmer
    2019-05-22 05:08

    quite enjoyable account of a cycling trip along the Channel coast. Tom Fort gives lots of interesting information about the placed he visits and the notable people who lived in them. Some places he is a little unfair to - there is much crticism of Dover and Folkestone for instance, but no mention of for instance Dover's entrancing museum, with the stunning bronze age boat, or Folkestone's attractive harbour with its fishing boats and abundance of fresh, cheap fish for sale. It can get a little monotonous at times, since a lot of south coast resorts suffer from the same problems - too much reliance on tourism, not enough employment out of season, too many holiday homes etc. and one demolished pier or winter garden after another. He is also a bit insistent on describing this or that personality as 'forgotten' - I looked up one of the people he insisted was forgotten on google and found numerous references, dozens of photos, and at least two biographies - perhaps not so forgotten after all. on the other hand, while in Torquay there is not one mention of the woman who surely must have been Torquay's most famous resident - Agatha Christie. Perhaps she isn't forgotten enough to rate a mention.

  • Paul
    2019-05-04 11:02

    Good holiday read.

  • Christine
    2019-04-30 07:08

    Radio BBC

  • Stoic_quin
    2019-04-29 09:59

    This is dull crap from start to finish. It’s like Bill Bryson gone senile, dosed with a combination of sedatives, added in with some righteous twaddle (this arse is a holier than thou cyclist) and then given a ‘Mitchell & webb’ sneer without any of the redeeming features. A putrid pile of bollocks that reads like the author did a Wikipedia search before combining with his failed humour , somehow creating something that even on a train I couldn’t move in for three hours, staring into the brain dead eyes of the fellow travellers was a preferable alternative.

  • Matt
    2019-04-26 06:11

    A very frank and honest travel guide. Having visited a lot of the places in this book I loved getting the opinion of someone else on these places. I found I agreed with a lot of his “findings” but there were 1 or 2 I did disagree with.Very informative without just being a wall of information thrown at you.

  • Peter
    2019-05-05 11:19

    I was irritated by the extremely poor quality of the photographs, which may as well not have been there for the value they added to the book.It felt more like a travel guide than an interesting read. I enjoyed reading about the sections I knew or was about to visit, but the narrative wasn't interesting enough for me to read about the other sections that I neither knew nor was about to visit.

  • Daniel Fox
    2019-05-02 07:18

    Fairly interesting book with lots of facts about the places he visited.

  • Mike
    2019-05-18 05:16

    Through Kent, Sussex and Hampshire this book reads like a list of towns and how bad each one is due to the presence of visitor centres, civic leaders, town planners and officialdom in general. The things that go to lessen the badness of each place, in the eyes of the author, are less officialdom and specifically fishing, beer, cycling, fishing, the absence of town planning and er... oh yes, fishing.However as the author moves further through Dorset and Devon and into Cornwall there is a greater emphasis on historical events and facts (many tied up one way or another with fishing) and these are generally well told in an amusing manner.So stick with it, go west, and things gets better. About Pentewan: "..its past seems somehow richer and more colourful than its present."... "The harbour died, fishing diminished to almost nothing, farming much the same. Tourism came and thrived and swallowed up everything.“

  • Daren Kearl
    2019-04-30 09:54

    A journey by the author along the shoreline from Dover to Lands End. The scenario for each place visited quickly became very similar and predictable: decrying the poor town planning; a titbit of cultural heritage; a chat to a local about what they thought of the place; a tale of a colourful character or incident. Tom also seems to judge places on whether they have a second hand bookshop!The general message I took from the book was looking out to sea was meditative and calming, compared to looking from the sea to where mankind has spoilt the land. We can add a few wind turbines and trawl out the fish stocks but essentially the sea is beyond our ability to conquer, which makes it the more appealing.

  • Sharon
    2019-05-13 05:06

    I decided to read this book as I love reading about places around our little island. Some I've been to, many I haven't, I'm just interested in the stories and history of these places. This journey takes us along the channel, from Kent right down to Devon and Cornwall. I know some of the towns and places en route, so was looking forward to reading about them. It was an interesting book but to be honest I didn't find some of the stories enjoyable - some were interesting little facts, some were a bit boring.Saying that, It was lovely to take a journey round the coast picturing the places I'd been to, and for the places I hadn't I looked them up on google maps!

  • Steve
    2019-05-16 06:10

    A good read, on a big subject - thus you may feel there are geographical omissions, despite its 400 pages. If you've read Fort's excellent A303 book, you'll know what to expect. I felt that perhaps he should have offered less about the places he visited but given more about the journey itself, and the people he meet.

  • Katharine
    2019-04-25 09:03

    Enjoyable amble, or rather cycle, along the South Coast of England from Dover to Land's End. Some interesting anecdotes and observations that give a flavour of this coastline but generally a very light read.

  • Simon Evans
    2019-05-22 06:06

    Cantankerous and with disdain in abundance but the interesting anecdotes make it a worthwhile read.