Read He's Either Dead or in St. Paul by D.B. Moon Online

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“It’s the era of Capone and Dillinger, when gangsters ruled St. Paul. Two thugs, Sly and Eightball, want to move up in the ranks. They betray their boss, form an uneasy alliance, and kidnap a priest, hoping he can decipher a rare document that will lead them to riches beyond their dreams. The mob and a crooked cop are out for blood and will do everything in their power to“It’s the era of Capone and Dillinger, when gangsters ruled St. Paul. Two thugs, Sly and Eightball, want to move up in the ranks. They betray their boss, form an uneasy alliance, and kidnap a priest, hoping he can decipher a rare document that will lead them to riches beyond their dreams. The mob and a crooked cop are out for blood and will do everything in their power to stop them. “He’s Either Dead or in St. Paul is a thrill ride that brings back the grit and suspense of the hard-boiled crime genre. Slide over, Spillane and Chandler. D. B. Moon is the new mug on the scene—and he’s taking over.” — David Fingerman, author of Silent Kill. ____________________________________ God must have created Sylvester Hobbs while nursing a hangover. Dangerous and ill-tempered, Sly quickly realizes that life as a gangster in 1928 Prohibition St. Paul isn’t all speak easies and hot-and-cold running molls. Sometimes there’s Hell to pay. After a botched snatch-and-grab, Sly finds a mysterious document on one of his deceased victims. The document, and the possible fortune it represents, grabs hold of Sly and refuses to let go. Pinned down by a ruthless Mob boss and a crooked but savvy cop, Sly is forced to kidnap Father Patrick Murphy who alludes to the fact he has prior knowledge of the document. Despite several warnings from Father Murphy to stop following the cursed piece of paper, Sly forges ahead with the frail old priest dragging behind. The truth about the document unfolds layer by layer until its true origin is discovered. Sly finds it isn’t the document he needed to fear, but who it really belongs to....

Title : He's Either Dead or in St. Paul
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 25173552
Format Type : Kindle Edition
Number of Pages : 273 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

He's Either Dead or in St. Paul Reviews

  • Susan Fetterer
    2019-01-10 11:14

    He's Either Dead or in St. Paul is this year's first read for the Moveable Feast Book Club, 2016 being a year focused on suspense/mystery fiction written by regional authors. Anticipating less rather than more I was pleased to find myself instantly pulled into the scene-setting action and as I watched characterizations unfold and blossom into the intriguing and engaging storyline, I found myself enjoying the complexities of a well-written mystery, a genre I've rarely explored. A story containing elements which pepper life---love/hate/humor, etc.---make for an entertaining but not necessarily relatable read. Escapism is part of reading fun....taking us to unexplored places. Some we'd like to visit, others not so much. I was mesmerized by one multi-faceted character in particular and found this individual to be layered, early on, with elements reminiscent of characters actor Barry FItzgerald played in forties films. If you opt to read this book, see if you can identify who I'm referring to.....

  • Karl Jorgenson
    2019-01-15 13:04

    He’s Either Dead or in St. Paul has a split personality. It’s a gritty, bloody gangster novel set in 1930 St. Paul, a time when prohibition gangsters ran the city in partnership with the corrupt police force. Sly, a small-time hood, gets a whiff of a big score and traipses off with Eightball, a slightly more experienced and considerably more violent hood to seize the treasure. Ninety percent of the novel has the pair, forced to work together, kidnapping, killing, and brutalizing anybody who is even a bit slow to help them find the treasure. For sheer brutality, this novel can’t be beat.Here’s the schizophrenia: in the last couple of chapters you find out that the story isn’t really the story, that somebody only dreamed J.R. got shot. (See: eighties TV, Dallas). All this time you’ve been reading a different story and didn’t know it; it’s a helluva surprise and either leaves you pondering or angry.But since you had no reason to suspect this total surprise was coming, you spent 270 pages trying to understand and make sense of what you had: brutal gangsters spreading terror and murder. Would the Maltese Falcon be a better book if it turned out at the end that the Falcon statue was a pan-dimensional being and none of the characters Sam Spade meets were real, merely figments of Spade’s imagination? I wonder.The premise for the gangster tale is a good one. Sly and Eightball are at each others’ throats and would kill the other except for their pressing need. They are pursued by the meanest, most brutal psychopath of a gangster from Chicago, DeLuce, and the corrupt chief of the St. Paul Police. With gun play, stabbings, kidnappings, and beatings the heroes stay one step ahead of their pursuers. Problem #1: you can’t possibly like any character in this book. Sly might get killed while he murders his way to riches? Aw. I’d shoot him myself. Okay, DeLuce is worse: I’d shoot him first. I couldn’t care what happened to any of this bunch.The idea that they put this much mayhem into pursuing a treasure map seemed ludicrous to me: the characters seem utterly without judgment or skepticism, except when they’re pistol whipping some poor schmuck who might not be telling them everything they know about the treasure. And they all break into stilted, middle-school theater language at times: ‘Excuse me, I did not give you permission to raise arms in my presence.’ Or is that 1950s Robin Hood Movie language? This book lives on dialogue between gritty characters and I found it regularly fell flat.Sly and Eightball kidnap a priest who knows something about the treasure. They threaten him, they hit him, he proclaims that their immortal souls will be forfeit if they pursue this evil, cursed treasure. Wow. A couple of street hoods are listening to this? Okay, a couple of chapters later, the priest agrees to help them. Stockholm syndrome? They make a cute threesome as they bluster and destroy across the city.It all seemed ridiculous and impossible. DeLuce, in town from Chicago, holds the chief of police’s family hostage to gain his help in capturing Sly and Eightball. Sad that the chief didn’t think to call on some of the hundreds of officers under his command. DeLuce pushes the chief around as easily and with as much humiliation as John Wayne might force Dr. Sheldon Cooper through an obstacle course.And then you come to the end. And all these things that make the book wrong are explained. You were wrong to assume it was a realistic story about gangsters. If we could sue D.B. Moon in Plot Court, (presided over by John (Camp) Sandford), Moon would beat every charge. Character choices, dialogue, behavior? Illusion or orchestration to serve a point. Ha! It was great book; you were hating it for the wrong reasons. There should be a medal for chugging all the way through to the surprise.