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'The BBC, to my mind at least, is the most powerful British institution of them all, for, as well as informing, educating and entertaining, it permeates and reflects our existences, infiltrates our imaginations, forms us in myriad ways.' Charlotte Higgins, the Guardian's chief culture writer, steps behind the polished doors of Broadcasting House and investigates the BBC. B'The BBC, to my mind at least, is the most powerful British institution of them all, for, as well as informing, educating and entertaining, it permeates and reflects our existences, infiltrates our imaginations, forms us in myriad ways.' Charlotte Higgins, the Guardian's chief culture writer, steps behind the polished doors of Broadcasting House and investigates the BBC. Based on her hugely popular essay series, this personal journey answers the questions that rage around this vulnerable, maddening and uniquely British institution. Questions such as, what does the BBC mean to us now? What are the threats to its continued existence? Is it worth fighting for? Higgins traces its origins, celebrating the early pioneering spirit and unearthing forgotten characters whose imprint can still be seen on the BBC today. She explores how it forged ideas of Britishness both at home and abroad. She shows how controversy is in its DNA and brings us right up to date through interviews with grandees and loyalists, embattled press officers and high profile dissenters, and she sheds new light on recent feuds and scandals. This is a deeply researched, lyrically written, intriguing portrait of an institution at the heart of Britain....

Title : This New Noise: The Extraordinary Birth and Troubled Life of the BBC
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ISBN : 9781783350728
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 288 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

This New Noise: The Extraordinary Birth and Troubled Life of the BBC Reviews

  • Bettie☯
    2019-04-29 22:55

    Description: 'The BBC, to my mind at least, is the most powerful British institution of them all, for, as well as informing, educating and entertaining, it permeates and reflects our existences, infiltrates our imaginations, forms us in myriad ways.' Charlotte Higgins, the Guardian's chief culture writer, steps behind the polished doors of Broadcasting House and investigates the BBC. Based on her hugely popular essay series, this personal journey answers the questions that rage around this vulnerable, maddening and uniquely British institution. Questions such as, what does the BBC mean to us now? What are the threats to its continued existence? Is it worth fighting for? Higgins traces its origins, celebrating the early pioneering spirit and unearthing forgotten characters whose imprint can still be seen on the BBC today. She explores how it forged ideas of Britishness both at home and abroad. She shows how controversy is in its DNA and brings us right up to date through interviews with grandees and loyalists, embattled press officers and high profile dissenters, and she sheds new light on recent feuds and scandals. This is a deeply researched, lyrically written, intriguing portrait of an institution at the heart of Britain.Opening: Reith of the BBC: The manse on Lynedoch Street, Glasgow, is a handsome double-fronted house with nine steps up to its front door. It clings to the flank of its sandstone church, whose brace of tall, pencil-straight towers are linked by an elegant classical pediment.John Reith: 1st Baron Reith, KT, GCVO, GBE, CB, TD, PC (20 July 1889 – 16 June 1971)

  • Paul
    2019-05-14 02:53

    This New Noise – An Interesting History of the BBCCharlotte Higgins is a culture writer at that well known liberal newspaper The Guardian, the ‘in-house’ newspaper of the masses at Broadcasting House, and over a year she had a number of essays published in said national paper of the chattering classes. This New Noise is an anthology of those published essays and brings her full circle in her examination of the BBC, and her broad brush approach taking in the history, present and future of the BBC.There can be no more timely publication for This New Noise as the BBC charter is up for renewal, and the licence fee the funding model is being reviewed. As someone who has attended political conferences where the BBC have sent over 400 staff then had the tapes sent back to London for editing whereas the commercial rivals send about 20 staff do everything onsite and produce similar broadcasts the BBC is not my favourite broadcaster. Like many on the outside I see the BBC as over staffed, with too many middle and senior managers who in turn are overpaid out of the public purse. So can Higgins, from the metro chattering classes, the beating heart of Guardian readers and BBC luvvies change my mind?Taking us on a history of the BBC is always a good reminder of why the BBC does have a special place in the heart of the nation as our national broadcaster on television and radio. Through interviews and various character sketches, this is a story of great men and women, but she is not afraid to point out the leadership from Reith to Lord Hall has been male led but that could change in the future.While this look at the BBC is an objective view of those that have sat in the Director-General’s chair other characters do make an appearance throughout that book. What Higgins does find about her year long look at the BBC that it is akin to a City State, and what she has written is a portrait of the media giant from the tiny acorn to a mighty dominant oak in the British field of broadcasting. She certainly seems to have a lot of love and respect for the institution, not sure it actually deepens the debate about the future.What This New Noise does do is slowly put together an intricate picture of the BBC now and then through some wonderful biographies of the people involved, the politics in the early days. How in the War years the BBC was taken to heart by the British public and it has grown from there. Where the book is lost is in the modern era where a bureaucracy has built more layers than a lasagne and management speak are at the fore. This is the BBC the public is rallying against and I do not believe Higgins, The Guardian or the BBC leadership understands that as we see creativity stunted and people overpaid producing per television and radio.This is an excellent book for the history and the colour of the BBC of old but like the Guardian and BBC for the modern era deeply out of touch with the public and the possible reader outside the chattering classes.

  • Simon Pitt
    2019-04-28 03:56

    Nice tour through the history of the BBC. But when it comes to structure it was a real mess of a book.

  • Alex Watson
    2019-04-22 03:04

    Written in the run up to the current license fee settlement in 2016, so on the present state of things it’s a little dated, but it’s excellent on the foundation of the BBC and the creation of its culture. Until I read it, I don’t think I realised how influential its first days still are. Some great quotes in there too: “the BBC is an idea. You either believe in it or you don’t.”

  • Tracey Sinclair
    2019-05-02 00:03

    Fascinating, well-researched and admirably balanced look at the BBC that both makes a compelling argument for why we need it and unflinchingly examines its shortcomings and failings. Important and timely.

  • Akin
    2019-05-18 01:02

    The oddest thing about this book is that (inadvertently, I suspect) it left me rather positively predisposed towards John Birt. To be fair, i was in another place, figuratively and literally, when he was DG. Still...A reasonably informative read, despite a rather unfocused aspect. Rich on anecdote, cautiously opinionated (yes, there is a contradiction there; what I mean to say is that the author has opinions, but puts them across very politely), tapers away a bit towards the end. It should be noted that this clearly isn't (and wasn't intended to be) a history of the BBC, rather an assessment of its place in the British psyche. I don't think it quite gets there, not least because it tilts towards the historical perspective; the book hovers uncertainly over the most glaring of the BBC's current problems (bloat), and consequently isn't perhaps as sharp on the possible futures of Auntie as it could be. But this shouldn't put you off. It is short enough, and well-written enough, to serve as a conversation starter, rather than as a definitive statement about the (not so new) noise.

  • Simon
    2019-05-18 01:06

    At 240 pages this was never going to be a comprehensive history of the BBC, and to be fair it doesn't even try. What it does (and does well) is sketch a number of vivid portraits of key figures in BBC history, from Reith to Birt and beyond, and outlines some of the organisations main strengths and weaknesses. It does a good job of indicating the complexity both of the organisation itself and the issues surrounding its existence. The chapter on its approach to news reporting, particularly recent scandals involving Jimmy Saville and Edward Snowden, is particularly strong. Higgins is an insightful and eloquent writer and while in the end she comes down in the firmly pro-BBC camp, she's clear-eyed about its failings and the room for improvement.

  • Sue Robinson
    2019-05-21 03:12

    Some interesting bits in between the not so interesting. I liked reading about the various Director Generals and their differing approaches, but a lot of the time the book flitted all over the place.