Read The Veil: Women Writers on Its History, Lore, and Politics by Jennifer Heath Online

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This groundbreaking volume, written entirely by women, examines the vastly misunderstood and multilayered world of the veil. Veiling— of women, of men, and of sacred places and objects—has existed in countless cultures and religions from time immemorial. Today, veiling is a globally polarizing issue, a locus for the struggle between Islam and the West and between contemporThis groundbreaking volume, written entirely by women, examines the vastly misunderstood and multilayered world of the veil. Veiling— of women, of men, and of sacred places and objects—has existed in countless cultures and religions from time immemorial. Today, veiling is a globally polarizing issue, a locus for the struggle between Islam and the West and between contemporary and traditional interpretations of Islam. But veiling was a practice long before Islam and still extends far beyond the Middle East. This book explores and examines the cultures, politics, and histories of veiling. Twenty-one gifted writers and scholars, representing a wide range of societies, religions, ages, locations, races, and accomplishments, here elucidate, challenge, and/or praise the practice. Expertly organized and introduced by Jennifer Heath, who also writes on male veiling, the essays are arranged in three parts: the veil as an expression of the sacred; the veil as it relates to the emotional and the sensual; and the veil in its sociopolitical aspects. This unique, dynamic, and insightful volume is illustrated throughout. It brings together a multiplicity of thought and experience, much of it personal, to make readily accessible a difficult and controversial subject.Contributors: Kecia Ali, Michelle Auerbach, Sarah C. Bell, Barbara Goldman Carrel, Eve Grubin, Roxanne Kamayani Gupta, Jana M. Hawley, Jasbir Jain, Mohja Kahf, Laurene Lafontaine, Shireen Malik, Maliha Masood, Marjane Satrapi, Aisha Shaheed, Rita Stephan, Pamela K. Taylor, Ashraf Zahedi, Dinah Zeiger, Sherifa Zuhur...

Title : The Veil: Women Writers on Its History, Lore, and Politics
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ISBN : 9780520255180
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 360 Pages
Status : Available For Download
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The Veil: Women Writers on Its History, Lore, and Politics Reviews

  • Erin O.
    2018-07-29 07:49

    I read this book for a sociology class in college and it was so interesting! The essays in the book cover all different kinds of veiling in different times and cultures.

  • Raniaghieth
    2018-07-23 06:57

    A very good read, has got some very powerful and profound stories..and addressing the veil issue from different crucial aspects

  • Elevate Difference
    2018-08-19 11:15

    Let’s face it. When many of us hear the word “veil,” we think of the oppression of Muslim women. Yet few of us know that the practice of veiling is found in the history of most cultural and religious traditions. The Veil: Women Writers on Its History, Lore, and Politics is the first-ever anthology that brings together the larger picture of veiling into a single volume. The twenty-one contributors, while all women, are varied in their own backgrounds, opinions, and areas of focus. They challenge us to move beyond the generalized understanding of the “veil” to encompass a variety of coverings - such as the Hasidic Jewish tikhl, Amish prayer cap, Roman Catholic humeral veil, and ancient Greek himation. They also challenge us to complicate our understanding of Muslim veiling by becoming aware of the varieties of coverings among Muslim women and understanding the varying reasons why women choose to veil, including veiling as a form of resistance to Western domination, preservation of culture, increased power in public arenas, and as a fashion statement.The collection, true to its intended purpose, has many wide-ranging and interesting essays. In “The Amish Veil: Symbol of Separation and Community,” Jana Hawley writes about her experience living among an Amish community for one year. She complicates the stereotyped Hollywood picture we have of Amish dress as she explains how varieties of dress among differing communities reflect levels of orthodoxy. Pamela Taylor writes about the discrimination she faces as a Muslim feminist and wearer of the hijab in “I Just Want to Be Me: Issues in Identity for One American Muslim Woman.” In “Nubo: The Wedding Veil,” Sarah Bell adopts the graphic novel form to illustrate the similarities between the Christian bridal veil and veiling in other cultures. She writes, “even the word ‘nuptial’ comes from the Latin word ‘nubo,’ meaning, I veil myself. So why is it that we ‘liberated’ Western brides still wear the veil?”Veiling is a highly contested act, and the contributors are not all in agreement on the validity of its purposes. Yet the unified message arising from this anthology is strong: veiling predates Islam and has multiple meanings and purposes that shift throughout time as a response to changing circumstances. Editor Jennifer Heath relays a critical idea in the epilogue: “To veil or not to veil is not the burning question,” she writes. Global problems facing women are on the rise, and Heath believes that ideological battles among feminists about veiling distract us from confronting the truly serious problems at hand. In complicating our notions of veiling and relaying the importance of context, The Veil is a critical read for feminists and students of Women’s Studies in the United States.Review by Arwa Ibrahim

  • Shiva Esfandnia
    2018-08-18 04:08

    “The veil: women writers on its history, lore, politics” is an informational book edited by Jennifer Heath. This book is a collection of twenty-one essays written by Jewish, Muslim, Hindu and Christian women covering different kinds of veiling and areas of focus in different times and religions. Each chapter brings a refreshing view on the veil, based on religion, politics or tradition. The essays help us understand the different reasons why women choose to veil, including reasons such as resistance to western influence, commitment to religion, and as a fashion statement. I learnt quite a lot of information about the veil from its history to its social issues and how it is perceived in different countries. It was surprising to learn how the veil is seen as a symbol of restraint and lack of freedom in some countries, while others see the veil as a form of commitment to God. It was very refreshing to get different perspectives on the veil from a variety of women from different backgrounds. I went in with a very narrow perspective of veiling and it definitely changed it. I would recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about veiling, as it was a very interesting read!

  • Bonnie Irwin
    2018-08-06 05:59

    An excellent group of essays that present a diverse sets of attitudes and practices about veiling. Though most of the book is about Islam, veils in Christian, Judaic, and Hindu tradition are also represented among the essays. Favorite Line: What is in a woman's head is more important than what is on it.

  • Zainab Maimani
    2018-07-30 05:56

    This book focuses on the cultural particularities that shapes one's choice of veiling. It a smart way to think about veiling.

  • Sarah
    2018-08-07 04:57

    And I'm in it!