Read Don't Kiss the Vicar by Charlie Cochrane Online

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Vicar Dan Miller is firmly in the closet in his new parish. Could the inhabitants of a sedate Hampshire village ever accept a gay priest? Trickier than that, how can he hide his attraction for one of his flock, Steve Dexter? Encouraged by his ex-partner to seize the day, Dan determines to tell Steve how he feels, only to discover that Steve’s been getting poison pen letterVicar Dan Miller is firmly in the closet in his new parish. Could the inhabitants of a sedate Hampshire village ever accept a gay priest? Trickier than that, how can he hide his attraction for one of his flock, Steve Dexter? Encouraged by his ex-partner to seize the day, Dan determines to tell Steve how he feels, only to discover that Steve’s been getting poison pen letters and suspicion falls on his fellow parishioners. When compassion leads to passion, they have to conceal their budding relationship, but the arrival of more letters sends Dan scuttling back into the closet. Can they run the letter writer to ground? More importantly, can they patch up their romance and will Steve ever get to kiss the vicar again?...

Title : Don't Kiss the Vicar
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 25987368
Format Type : ebook
Number of Pages : 115 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Don't Kiss the Vicar Reviews

  • Adam
    2019-05-01 18:38

    I've read very few MM books which deal with religion. I've never read an MM book where one of the MCs is a priest. I avoid such books because the inner "I hate myself because I'm gay but also want to be a good Christian" turmoil which is a common theme for this sub-genre gets old pretty fast. So ordinarily I wouldn't have given 'Don't Kiss the Vicar' a second look. But the short length and the English country setting convinced me to give a try. Simply put, I didn't feel any real connection between Dan and Steve. Within a few pages they went from being at each other's throats to thinking about long-term. It was a quick jump with little emotional basis. And the sex was all off-page, so I couldn't even say that they had sexual chemistry. It seemed as if the author just chose two very generic names, gave them to two very generic characters, and then just stuck them together. I got bored pretty quickly.However, I did think that the author handled the religion theme well. The self-hate is absent, with Dan and Steve already at peace with their sexuality and their religion. And the preaching is likewise absent. The religion in this novella accompanies the MCs' actions, rather than dictating them. It's a modern look at what faith and religion should like be in the 21st century.So 2 stars for me. I didn't connect to either of the main characters and their romance was bland. The only high point was a secondary character, Henry, who provided some comedy. While the religious aspect wasn't bad at all, the romance fell flat.Review copy provided through NetGalley.

  • Verity
    2019-05-01 20:57

    3,5 stars rounded up to 4When I read the synopsis of this book it sounded like Vicar of Dibley meets The Moving Finger, so I giggled when I read:"It wasn't even homophobic, really. More like a crackpot. 'The Moving Finger' sort of thing.""If you mean Agatha Christie, that story ended up in a murder,"Steve, a resident of a sleepy Hampshire village, receives a nasty poison pen:[image error]Things are complicated as Steve is hellbent not to let his crush on the new vicar show and is worried someone has seen through his facade. What's worse, he's not even sure it isn't the new vicar sending him anonymous letter packed with righteous babble. Vicar Dan feels the strain of the responsibility of his new position, made worse by loneliness and having to hide in the closet. He's struggling to ingratiate himself to the parishioners, especially a grumpy PCC member he's been dreaming of but who keeps giving him the evil eye, that's when he bothers to look his way at all. Spurred on by an ex, and adopting/adapting the motto: 'Carpe the fucking diem' Dan decides to throw caution to the wind and see if there's more to Steve than a brash facade." Life didn't pan out like a gay romance e-book, not least because neither he nor Steve resembled the oiled, chiselled, six-pack bearing guys who always seemed to feature in them."This is a sweet novella, although it ends much too abruptly without a satisfying end. Most loose ends remain loose and as a reader that usually feels like I've climbed a mountain but wasn't allowed to linger at the summit admiring the view. The MC's are very English, stiff upper lip and all that, so don't expect roaring libidos, kinks and chandelier sex. This is more of a 'things get sexy, a fade away, time for breakfast' type of MM romance. The insta-love is also a bit much, but then it all makes for an adorable read, low on angst and packed with enough sugar to almost give you diabetes. It's also an interesting glimpse into the lives of those residing in a tiny community where nothing remains a secret for long and worrying what others think is common sensible. It also raises the question of gay men and the Anglican church.All in all, this was an enjoyable sweet read.ARC was kindly provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review

  • Tamika♥RBF MOOD♥
    2019-05-03 13:52

    2 stars.I was completely bored by this tale. I literally wanted to skim the pages, but I decided against it since it was a novella. I didn't feel the connection between Steve and Daniel at. I got the attraction part, but the connection between two people which leaves us warm inside was really missing. Definitely a low-angst read which I appreciated, but I just didn't connect with the story.

  • Didi
    2019-05-23 19:53

    2.75 starsDon't Kiss A Vicar was a British novella set in small English village, a sort of small town cozy mystery on top of the young vicar's infatuation with the village's young solicitor. Some of the vicarage terminologies were lost to me; as well as some British lingo I'm not familiar with. But the story was typical Cochrane's style in the easy and sensible flow, off page bed scenes, and witty gabfest here and there. And THIS, I was familiar with.That saying, I found myself didn't particularly taken with the leads here, Daniel, the vicar and Steve, the solicitor. The story was told from their perspectives alternately, which gave insight on their thought and feeling. They didn't seem to be very strong characters and their closeted situation didn't seem that plausible to me, especially for Steve. There wasn't any hurtful or dark past that gave reasons to his fear. I also didn't really feel the attraction between them that much. It could be, the pages were not long enough to accommodate that, I don't know...The bright spot on this book came from the supporting character; the church warden, Harry. For me, he was crucial in lifting up the mood of the story and helping Daniel and Steve solving their problems. Cheers for Harry!!Note:ARC was kindly provided by the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  • Ulysses Dietz
    2019-05-04 17:51

    Steve Dexter has the hots for the vicar of St. Thomas, the gentle and handsome Daniel Miller. But that’s not appropriate, so he hides it under a sort of gruff argumentativeness that makes the Rev. Mr. Miller feel that Mr. Dexter dislikes him. You see, the vicar has the hots for Steve, too. But Dan is so painfully aware of propriety and unsure of his standing in this new parish that he returns Steve’s off-putting behavior move for move. A fortuitous accident brings the two men together, but their own past hurts and Dan’s priestly reticence threatens to undo their chance at happiness.Oh, this is so Jane Austen I could squeal. Only, of course, there’s the part about gay men in bed with each other, which Miss Austen avoided. But it is very, totally, painfully English. This is what Charlie Cochrane does—she does English. She does restraint and reticence and carefully concealed pain. Sometimes, I confess, she is so subtle that I miss things. This is a short book, and thus perhaps Charlie slid through things she might have explored more carefully, as she did in her fantastic “Cambridge Dons” novels (oh, I love them very much). But she gets us there in the end. The good people of St. Thomas live up to the best in British forbearance and kindness. As a lifelong Episcopalian (the American version of the Church of England), I’ve watched the dramatic change in the way we have accepted not only gay parishioners but gay priests and even bishops. The Church of England, our mother church, lagged behind for a while, but they seem to have caught up. This little slip of a novel probes that world of painful parish gentility, while also infusing it with a contemporary perspective that managed to startle me a few times. Dan is not ashamed of being gay. His mother teases him about finding a new boyfriend. Steve is not a closet case, but he is ever discreet, so as not to upset his fellow parishioners unduly, and to keep his place as a gay many on the inside of parish life. Being an Anglican priest is a unique calling in our world. It is a profession, but it is also a spiritual role that nobody takes on without a great heart and a profound soul. Cochrane manages to convey all of this without turning her gay priest into a saint or a eunuch. He’s a young man who’s close to his God; but a young man who is happy to be gay and yearning for love.I hope there’s more of these little books up Charlie’s sleeve. She does this so well, and I do enjoy them.

  • Hart
    2019-05-23 17:50

    I like Charlie Cochrane's books because I know she'll always deliver a sweet and hopeful romance, often with a lot of humor. This book made me laugh a few times. I also appreciate the way she throws my American self right into the deep end of British culture. I always end up having a great time wandering around Wikipedia and slang dictionaries when I read her books.The main character, Dan, is a gay vicar who is still getting to know some of his parishioners. Dan is very serious about his relationship with God, yet it's just an everyday part of who he is. He seems to think of God as his friend, and his belief definitely inspires him to do good in the world. I'm an atheist, but this type of religious belief is easy for me to understand and admire, and it's also interesting to learn about. It's a much more intimate and positive type of Christianity than I'm used to encountering. On the negative side, the character development was a little bit lacking. I'm really not sure I could describe either main character's personality too well. Also, at certain points, Dan and Steve's actions made it hard for me to like either of them. I'm not sure what was going on with the point of view; although there were a few sections from Steve's PoV early on, I think it would've made sense to continue giving his perspective as the story progressed. The plot was pretty good and was wrapped up nicely.The ending is happy-for-now, but I can imagine these two eventually achieving a happy-ever-after together. I liked the side characters, especially Harry, and I have such a clear mental image of Margaret. If you like this author's books, I'm sure you'll enjoy this one as well!

  • Angela Goodrich
    2019-05-20 13:31

    I really enjoyed Don’t Kiss the Vicar. I feel I should point out to potential readers that the novella is set in England and is written by an English author, and with that being said, it is a VERY English novel. So if you are a reader who has problems with British terminology, this probably won’t be the book for you. Fortunately, despite my wholly American upbringing, I adore English authors and their novels (well, at least the contemporary ones) and Don’t Kiss the Vicar was not only an enjoyable story, but also an informative one as I learned about another religion’s views on homosexuality among its clergymen.In an effort to find his place in his role as vicar in a new parish, Dan has kept a lid on his homosexuality as he does not believe it will be well-received news in the small Hampshire village. He has done such a good job of it, that he had no idea that the parishioner he is attracted to feels the same way. The fact that Steve can be quite combative verbally didn’t hurt either. Honestly, were it not for an accident, the two men might have never learned that the other was gay. While the precipitating event was unpleasant, and led to an equally unpleasant revelation on Steve’s part about the “poison pen” letters he was receiving, the incidents gave them the much needed opportunity to clear the air, so to speak. With this being a novella, things do move rather quickly once their mutual attraction is revealed, but considering all that each man is dealing with at the time, it is understandable and believable. But when the letters continue and Dan is unsure of what to do, his hesitation causes a riff in the new relationship.Cochrane strikes a nice balance between the religious issues, the romance, and the romantic suspense elements. I kind of enjoyed that Dan and Steve were so intent on not outing themselves, that they nearly missed out on each other. The small circle of parishioners we meet over the course of the book were, for the most part, quite delightful – as much as I liked Harry, it was Mavis who had me chuckling. I was surprised by the few reactions we were privy to once Dan’s secret was out. Even though their relationship was a bit of a rollercoaster ride, with things happening relatively quickly, I found its progression believable. What did surprise me was the romantic suspense angle because far more happened in the thread than I would have expected for a novella. Don’t Kiss the Vicar was an enjoyable read and I look forward to checking out more of Cochrane’s writing.I received a complimentary copy of the book in exchange for an honest review. Reviewed by Angela at Crystal's Many Reviewers!

  • Sarah
    2019-05-14 13:29

    I got an advance copy from Bold Strokes Books on Netgalley.My first impression was that the setting was really interesting - rural, church, characters older than usual. It's a promising premise with interesting characters a bit more diverse than many recent books and I found the things the characters had to say (including in the narration) very captivating. ""Jesus always had a capacity for doing exactly what people didn't expect.... "What did Jesus say you should do" was maybe more his scene..."However, I did find the pacing a bit plodding and often the characters were only explored in the capacity of saying interesting things - at least that's what it looked like. The conflict is a bit lacking and always seemed to be waiting for a shot of adrenaline - a sense of danger or at least something being at stake other than the protagonist's reputation.There were many interesting characters, which the book obviously does focus on, but it suffers from not diving into the relationships between them enough. We don't see much of the chemistry between Dan and Steve, not even in an understated way, and the limited third-person narrator doesn't seem to present a tone personal enough to suit the themes of this book.The themes of religion were handled maturely and with insight, which I'm quite grateful for. I'm not religious, but I did have a deep respect and understanding of the protagonist's faith and his rationalization of it in relation to his sexuality. (see the quote above) The author doesn't shy away from criticizing the dehumanizing "terrible, shiny, plastic happiness" of popular religion that "blame[s] every bad thing on a lack of faith." It's very gratifying and eye-opening to see my personal doubts articulated in such a purposeful and powerful way. I'd say many people would feel grateful to see their pain and doubt being acknowledged, not dismissed or talked over.

  • Ian
    2019-04-26 15:38

    ARC reviewed for Netgalley.Vicar Dan Miller is firmly in the closet in his new parish. Could the inhabitants of a sedate Hampshire village ever accept a gay priest? Trickier than that, how can he hide his attraction for one of his flock, Steve Dexter?Encouraged by his ex-partner to seize the day, Dan determines to tell Steve how he feels, only to discover that Steve’s been getting poison pen letters and suspicion falls on his fellow parishioners. When compassion leads to passion, they have to conceal their budding relationship, but the arrival of more letters sends Dan scuttling back into the closet.Can they run the letter writer to ground? More importantly, can they patch up their romance and will Steve ever get to kiss the vicar again?Heart warming story with a splash of mystery. A hint of ‘The Moving Finger’ by Agatha Christie…without the murders!If you like the review and would like to see and read more reviews on books the Final Chapter Reading Group and I have read this year. Please visit my blog @ https://finalchapterreadersgroup.word... like and follow.

  • Heather
    2019-05-15 12:33

    4-1/2 starsA great story of a quaint little English village that may not be as friendly as it seems on the surface. I know that some people would say that the story could have been a little better had there been more of Dan and Steve's relationship but for me not all stories require every little minute detail. I loved the fact that it isn't religion that comes into play in regards to the couple's conflicts, yes it's the bases of the poison pen letters but not what has been in Dan and Steve's way, that is all them. Harry adds some well timed humor and I have to say that I found the friendship between Dan and his ex refreshing. Another great example of Miss Cochrane's English village storytelling.

  • Stevie Carroll
    2019-05-18 16:39

    Splendid little story about a suitably diverse bunch of eccentrics in a village parish. I loved the apt chapter headings and it was great to see a story in which the hero's ex was his friend rather than an adversary for the new love interest. The mystery sub-plot got wrapped up a little too swiftly for my tastes, but I'd love to see more of all the cast sometime.

  • Max
    2019-05-02 15:47

    "Cozy gay Anglican romance" is a subgenre I didn't know I needed, but now that I've read Don't Kiss the Vicar I'm dying for more. Short, sweet, and oh so terribly English, this is a charming little read that handles big themes with a very light touch.

  • Alison
    2019-04-25 20:33

    Very pleasant. This is a lovely little story. It's low on drama and high on English small town charm. It's pretty classic Charlie Cochrane, really, and it's quite enjoyable to read.