Read The Hanged Man: A Mystery in Fin de Siecle Paris by Gary Inbinder Online

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Paris: July, 1890. Inspector Achille Lefebvre and his wife Adele are enjoying their stay at a seaside resort—until a body found hanging from a bridge in a public park demands the Inspector's attention.Is it suicide or murder? A twisted trail of evidence draws Inspector Lefebvre into a shadowy underworld of international intrigue, espionage, and terrorism. Time is of the esParis: July, 1890. Inspector Achille Lefebvre and his wife Adele are enjoying their stay at a seaside resort—until a body found hanging from a bridge in a public park demands the Inspector's attention.Is it suicide or murder? A twisted trail of evidence draws Inspector Lefebvre into a shadowy underworld of international intrigue, espionage, and terrorism. Time is of the essence; pressure mounts on the Sureté to get results. Achille's chief orders him to work with his former partner, Inspector Rousseau, now in charge of a special unit in the newly formed political brigade. But can Achille trust the detective who let him down in another case?Inspector Lefebvre uses innovative forensics and a network of police spies to uncover a secret alliance, a scheme involving the sale of a cutting-edge high explosive, and an assassination plot that threatens to ignite a world war....

Title : The Hanged Man: A Mystery in Fin de Siecle Paris
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781681771649
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 352 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Hanged Man: A Mystery in Fin de Siecle Paris Reviews

  • Marita
    2018-12-10 05:39

    “Is perception reality, Étienne?” enquires Inspector Lefebvre on page 7 of Gary Inbinder's latest novel, The Hanged Man: A Mystery in Fin de Siecle Paris.This is a recurring theme in Gary’s novels. In The Flower to the Painter artist Marcia Brownlow dresses shabbily to deceive someone and gain their sympathy. Then she assumes the role of a man and becomes the artist Mark. In his excellent novel, Confessions of the Creature Gary picks up the story of Frankenstein’s creature and gives him a second chance at life, but is the creature what people perceive him to be (and for that matter is he what he himself thinks he perceives)? In The Hanged Man Inspector Achille Lefebvre questions whether the man who has been found hanged in Montmartre is in fact a suicide or is there something more sinister? I’m not going to tell you the story, but suffice to say that the hanged man had of course been murdered, else we might not have a story at all. But again things are not as they appear; it is not a straightforward murder, but a case of international intrigue. Lefebvre and his team must work against the clock, and whether the inspector likes it or not he has to cooperate with Rousseau who has questionable methods. Whereas Lefebvre is happy to try out new scientific methods and base his assumptions upon facts, Rousseau prefers to wring answers from suspects.There is an interesting cast of characters, including some from the first novel in this series, The Devil in Montmartre: A Mystery in Fin de Siècle Paris. In The Hanged Man at least one person is rather mysterious and downright dangerous. Who exactly is Monsieur de Gournay? Or is it…? Or, perhaps…? "This individual is a master of disguise and deception, a chameleon-like person who changes roles and identities with ease." Again perception is not necessarily reality. The plot also has a feint or two.The first part of the novel is unfortunately a bit contrived. Later Gary gets into his stride and the story takes off. I also found in the first part that Lefebvre was almost too good to be true. Later he becomes more human, particularly when he insists on taking his wife out on a boat as previously promised, even though the weather is foul. “”I’ve promised you a row, and that is what you shall have”, he said stubbornly.” He is referring to rowing the boat, but they do of course end up having a row. Perhaps Lefebvre’s name dropping was also a little over the top and didn’t serve much purpose other than setting the scene of the story. Gary’s extensive research into that period (1890) is evident.The Conciergerie, Paris which is frequently referred to in the novel: (Photo: Wikipedia)###My thanks to Edelweiss for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review.

  • J.R.
    2018-11-19 01:42

    Gary Inbinder's second foray into 19th century Paris begins, appropriately, at a crime scene.A body has been found hanged from a bridge in a Parisian park with a history of violence. First indications are the man was a suicide, but Inspector Achille Lefebvre isn't so sure. The pathologist confirms Achille's suspicion the death was a murder.The victim is identified as a Russian emigre with ties to the anarchist movement. This draws Achille into the dangerous worlds of espionage and international intrigue and an unwanted alliance with his former second, Inspector Rousseau who is now affiliated with a special political unit.Though Rousseau has spies on the streets and even among the anarchist and Marxist groups who shelter in the city, Achille does not trust the man after their experience in the previous book. Instead, he relies on his own spies, recruited by the famed Le Boudin, and the latest in forensics, including fingerprinting and photography.There are two possible motives for the murder and subsequent violence, but I'll leave you to discover them for yourselves.The person responsible for the crimes and his accomplices are identified early, which detracts a bit from the element of suspense. But all the other elements that go into the making of a good mystery are present and working properly, compelling you to read on.It was a treat to have another visit with Achille; his charming wife Adele; his bossy mother-in-law and other characters retained from the first novel.

  • Margaret Sankey
    2018-12-11 06:43

    Pedestrian historical mystery, with all of the hallmarks--lots of showing rather than telling, expository catchup from last book, spotless hero, constant name dropping (Bertiollon and hare brained ID idea, ah, those Toulouse-Lautrec and those left bank hijinks) to set the 1890 scene (by the way, 1890 is not Fin de Siecle) rather than be immersive, requite hero scene with stanard issue loyal but neglected spouse. Set in the awkward scene of French-Russian nascent alliance, with both the French and Russian secret police watching the community of Russian dissident exiles and not above knocking off the most troublesome of them for their own reasons.

  • nikkia neil
    2018-12-16 01:59

    Thanks Pegasus Books and netgalley for this ARC.I love this series! It's the quintessential mystery set in my favorite time period in Paris. This is the perfect series to me because it's fresh each time, but like coming home too.

  • Michael Yoder
    2018-11-23 01:41

    Very good book, I let me sister borrow it after I was done. I doubt she will give it back to me, its ok though.

  • Donna Bresnak
    2018-11-23 03:31

    I received this book along with twoothers by this author from goodreads. I liked the first book very much, and this is the second in the series. I liked it even better. these are good mysteries with strong characters and a twisty plot. highly recommend them

  • Dale
    2018-12-17 00:52

    Inspector Achille Lefebvre Returns in style!My thanks to my contacts at Pegasus Books, Iris Blasi, Katie McGuire, and Maia Larson, for my review copy of this book. You ladies rock!The Hanged Man is Inbinder’s sequel to The Devil in Montmartre, and stars Inspector Achille Lefebvre of the French Sûreté. The date is July, 1890—the place, Fin-de-siécle Paris.A man has been discovered hanged from a bridge in the Parc des Buttes-Chaumont. There is a suicide note pinned to his body, written in the Cyrillic alphabet. The body is just another lonely person who ended it all. Or so it would seem…Then come the discrepancies; the man had been bound before he was hanged; the rope is expertly tied, and even the length of the drop is perfect for his size and weight! Inspector Lefebvre has a great belief in fingerprints, and even uses iodine fumes to bring out latent prints on the suicide note. Another person has left their prints on the paper.Lefebvre now plunges into a case that could have consequences for the entire country. He will once again have to work his old partner Inspector Rousseau, who has his own new-formed unit that deals with the political side of Sûreté investigations.There are Russian Anarchists in France who have plans of their own. There is rumor of a special explosive developed by the Russians and for sale to whoever will pay the best price. The Germans are believed to be interested. Proving any of this will be difficult if not impossible.There are daring robberies, conspirers among conspiracies, shadowy men and women who must all be kept under surveillance, questioned, and never trusted for a moment. There is one player who is unique in the tale—one who will keep the reader guessing until the final reveal. When you think you have it all figured out, Inbinder is just getting warmed up for a fantastic finale!If you haven’t yet read The Devil in Montmartre, I highly recommend that you start with that volume. Then this one is as good if not better than the first! I give this novel five stars plus!Quoth the Raven…

  • Charlie_c_cole
    2018-11-17 05:35

    Like the intrepid detective he created in The Devil in Monmartre, Gary Inbinder has done it again! His first Inspector Lefebre story was an origins piece, introducing bygone Paris and detailing the malformities of Toulouse-Lautrec, along with the underappreciated benefits of up-and-comping forensics. Now we “get it.” Now we can quickly visualize our honest cop, out-of-the-box “Professor” making a name for himself through old-fashioned detective work (spies, disguises, and tailing a suspect) and relatively unproven technology. Oh, it doesn’t hurt our hero’s image that a local journalist appears to echo newspaper editor Maxwell Scott in The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance (1962): "When the legend becomes fact, print the legend."While the first case was a simpler “whodunit” that allowed us to sit in on intimate conversations with the bad guys (fleshing them out/humanizing them), this case is about do-or-die urgency, with unexpected and rather pitched international stakes. Many times this reader could see parallels between certain attitudes of THEN and NOW. Anarchists who disagree with national government and want to blow things up just because. Who did it? But, more importantly, what was the motivation? Figure that out, and the rest will follow.So many interesting and colorful characters you will want to revisit (whether it’s the detective’s mother-in-law, the elderly idealist, the Dirty Harry-like results-oriented anti-hero). And unlike a brilliant detective from across the channel, who seems to waste effort and time but working outside the system, Lefebre has a mostly-crack team at his disposal and he’s willing to let them do the dirty work (and I mean filthy!). I felt like I was reading Manhunt: The 12-Day Chase for Lincoln's Killer, only this time I didn’t know the ending before I opened the book. A real page-turner. Bravo!

  • Jean Kolinofsky
    2018-11-21 05:32

    I would like to thank NetGalley for providing this book for my review. In 1890 Paris, a body is found hanging from a bridge and Inspector Achille Lefebvre finds enough inconsistencies to determine that this was not a suicide. Evidence points to the Russian community, where he discovers a connection between the victim and a group of anarchists. Forced to work with his former partner, now an Inspector with the political brigade that he does not entirely trust, he draws on his own contacts to find and track his suspects.Inbinder brings Fin de Siecle Paris to life. Communication between police is often by messenger. Lefebvre longs for advances in motorized transport, both for its speed and to reduce the odiferous deposits left on the streets by the horses pulling the trams. Fingerprinting is a new technique and not widely used, but Lefebvre uses it in his investigation, along with a crime scene photographer rather than a sketch artist.This is a story filled with wonderful characters, from Lefebvre's understanding wife Adele to Delphine, a performer and artist's model with feelings for the Inspector. He also receives assistance from Toulouse Lautrec, who observes and sketches persons of interest. Lefebvre, himself, is a man of honor who tries to balance his investigation with his obligations to family.For fans of historical mysteries, such as Alex Grecian's murder squad, this is not to be missed.

  • Jo Dervan
    2018-12-02 02:31

    In this second book in the Mystery in Fin de Siecle Paris series, it is 1890 and Inspector Achille Lefebre is investigating the hanging of a man in Montmartre. It appears to be a suicide but clues soon indicate that it was homicide. Before long, Lefebre and his former partner, Inspector Rousseau, find themselves in a case involving anarchists and emigres from Russia. While Rousseau prefers to use brute force and intimidation to gain information, Lefebre prefers more sophisticated and innovative methods like forensics and also a network of spies. With the help of memorable characters like Toulouse Lautrec, Delphine, a former prostitute turned entertainer, and two spies disguised as blind men, Lefebre and his partners are able to solve this mystery and foil a plot that could have started a world war.The book explores life in Paris in the 1890s as well as the beginnings of the use of forensics to solve crimes.

  • Rose
    2018-12-01 22:42

    In mid-summer Paris, a man's body is found hanging from a bridge in a small park. Is it murder or suicide? But wait, there's more : terrorist assassins, police spies and an international plot await detective Achille Lefebvre as he attempts to unwind this fin-de-siecle mystery. I always enjoy historical mysteries and this tale incorporates the historical aspects of forensic science as well: fingerprinting and photography were new to the scene at this time. You can see what a difference these possibilities have made in crime detection, though I would have thought there would be more opposition to them. Nevertheless, an extremely interesting read and my thanks to Goodreads for this preview copy.

  • Bonnie
    2018-11-24 01:52

    Paris, July 1890, Inspector Achille Lefebvre at The Suicide Bridge, where a dead man was found hanging. Suicide?? Murder?? The Inspector uses new "CSI" techniques & a network of informers to track down both the killers & the "brains" of both a murder, assassination plot & the source of a new high explosive! All this plot is interspersed with personal relationships & Achille's family life to make for a good read!! Many Thanks to Pegasus Books for this Review copy to read.

  • Lauren Bromley
    2018-11-21 23:45

    I received this book in a Goodreads giveaway. This was another great Inspector Lefebvre novel. There wasn't so much of a shocking plot twist as in the first one, but I still really enjoyed it. Historical fiction is one of my favorite genres, and this did not disappoint.

  • Gina Mullen
    2018-11-24 01:36

    A good, solid read. 3.5 is more accurate.

  • Jessica Christian
    2018-12-05 00:30

    I really like this book, it was short just over 200 pages but it was good. I like the story and time.

  • Cindy Ladensack
    2018-11-21 04:33

    The plot -- an interesting and complex story of political intrigue in 1890 Paris -- was very compelling. The characters, much less so. The various police officials seemed inconsistent in their reactions to events and each other. And the female characters--I know that this was not the 21st century, but they were all either old shrews or sex objects.... ugh. This story deserved better things from its characters.

  • Paula
    2018-12-16 04:57

    The Hanged Man by Gary Inbinder is a twisted trail of evidence that draws Inspector Lefebvre into a shadowy underworld of international intrigue, espionage, and terrorism. Time is of the essence; pressure mounts on the Sureté to get results. Achille's chief orders him to work with his former partner, Inspector Rousseau, now in charge of a special unit in the newly formed political brigade. But can Achille trust the detective who let him down in another case? Inspector Lefebvre uses innovative forensics and a network of police spies to uncover a secret alliance, a scheme involving the sale of a cutting-edge high explosive, and an assassination plot that threatens to ignite a world war.I was drawn in by the clues as they were tracked to reveal the killer. Then finding out that there was more to the story than a simple hanging definitely pulls the reader in. And I loved the setting of Paris, having visited there many times and particularly Montmartre. Interspersed into the story were personal snippets about the Inspector’s family and also his good relationship with his superior who is soon to retire. Stories where the policemen have less than ideal relationship with those around them have in some ways grown tiresome.The book, was possibly one of the most difficult reads I have ever experienced. I consider myself a reasonably well read person. But Mr. Inbinder used a complicated word where a simple one would have worked just as well. As a result, I spent much time looking up the meaning of words that I did not recognize. It took me far longer to read this book that it should have. Then I began to get confused with the Russian names but I know that could not be helped since most of the characters were Russian. The other thing that I thought made the book hard to read were the French references which one would expect in a book set in Paris. However, most authors find some way to explain the French references. In this book, the reader was frequently left hanging. I was thankful for my familiarity with France.Possibly I will now read the first in the series. I received this book in return for an honest review.

  • Pat
    2018-12-01 01:48

    Wish I had my time back. Seemed derivative. Informational stilted dialogue (yes, I know it was the 1800's). Author did the research and by-damned, he was going to incorporate it. Stuck it out because of the honest effort. So eager to get on to the next novel by Lydia Millet. Read one page and sighed in satisfaction.

  • David W.E.
    2018-12-05 01:42

    Frankly I think two stars is a bit generous. I did enjoy the setting, turn of the century Paris was an interesting place, and one the author clearly has knowledge of. I also enjoyed that it was brief. Call me old-fashioned, but I like to get to the end of a mystery and have the mystery be... you know, solved. Ideally through some combination of doggedness and brilliance by the protagonist. Without getting too much into spoilers we know pretty much the same amount about the motivations of the antagonists on page 10 as we do on page 210. Their plot is simplistic and obvious, and our hero discovers it basically by having lowlifes follow them around and snitch on them. Perhaps the book was trying to subtly make some larger point about the day to day tedium and banality of police work...

  • William
    2018-11-16 06:40

    A decent French police murder investigation pre WW1. The characters were interesting and the story was not too far out. The author interwove French phrases into the story but it did not detract from understanding the plot even if you have forgotten your high school French. For a writer living in California, the author did a good job giving the book a French flair and feeling of 1890 Paris.