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If Albert Kim has learned one thing in his tragic adolescence, it's that God (probably a sadistic teenaged alien) does not want him to succeed at Bern High. By the end of sophomore year, Al is so tired of humiliation that he's chosen to just forget girls and high school society in general, and enjoy the Zen-like detachment that comes from being an intentional loser.Then heIf Albert Kim has learned one thing in his tragic adolescence, it's that God (probably a sadistic teenaged alien) does not want him to succeed at Bern High. By the end of sophomore year, Al is so tired of humiliation that he's chosen to just forget girls and high school society in general, and enjoy the Zen-like detachment that comes from being an intentional loser.Then he meets Mia Stone, and all the repressed hormones come flooding back. Mia, his co-worker at the Bern Inn, is adorable, popular, and most intimidatingly, the ex- long-term girlfriend of Ivy-bound, muscle-bound king of BHS and world class jerk, Ryan Stackhouse. But -- chalk it up to the magic of Al's inner beauty -- by the end of a summer vacuuming hotel rooms and goofing off together, he and Mia are officially "something."Albert barely has time to ponder this miracle before the bomb drops: Ryan has been diagnosed with cancer, and he needs Mia's support, i.e. constant companionship. True, he's lost weight and he's getting radiation, but that doesn't make him any less of a jerk. And to Albert, it couldn't be more apparent that Ryan is using his cancer to steal Mia back. With the whole town rallying behind Ryan like he's a fallen hero, and Mia emotionally confused and worried for Ryan, Al's bid for love is not a popular campaign. In fact, it's exactly like driving the wrong way on a five-lane highway.In this desperately funny novel, David Yoo tells an authentic story of first love, and therein captures the agony, the mania, the kicking and screaming that define teenage existence....

Title : Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9781423109075
Format Type : PDF
Number of Pages : 386 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before Reviews

  • Thomas
    2018-10-20 09:52

    Albert Kim totally made this book for me, believe it or not. The story is about this socially awkward teenager, who has never experienced high school popularity or any social connection with basically anyone from his school. One summer he gets a job at a hotel and meets this really hot/nice girl, and gradually they fall for each other... but the thing is, this girl is really popular. So when the school year starts, you can imagine how difficult it would be for the two of them to have a relationship just by their social standings, but imagine if something else happened...This book was a surprisingly refreshing read. The only thing I didn't like was the really, dreadfully slow exposition and some parts of the plot. However, Albert's character development throughout the story was phenomonal. His transformation blew me away, and in my head I was rooting for him all the way through the story. I think any teenager would relate to this book because of the social peer pressure that takes place in high schools these days.

  • Jen
    2018-10-30 09:55

    First off - I loved this narrator. Sure, he was so immature that he made you cringe much of the time. Just like you'll yell "Don't go in there!" to a girl in a horror movie you'll want to sew up Albert's tongue half the time: making him unable to do or say one of the hundreds of things he does or says throughout the book. I think that's what I loved so much about this book - it was such a spot on representation of how dumb and self centered some boys and girls can be at (ahem) some ages. The last 50 pages or so lagged and I'm not sure the ending was very satisfying, but it's worth checking out if only to read the first few chapters. The descriptions of Albert's physical reactions to being in the same room as a hot girl are some of the funniest most heartfelt bits of teen lit I've ever read. Besides the hot-girl-syndrome effects, my favorite source of comedy and pain in this book are Albert's trying to do well Korean parents. He's the first Korean-American in the family and Alberts shares some really great insights. Trying to pin down the time/setting for this book is difficult, but based on the music, clothing and attitudes, I'd set it in the mid-90s. I'm going to put a hold on Yoo's other YA book, Girls for Breakfast, right now!

  • Dana Baldus
    2018-11-03 05:57

    I'm mixed on how I feel about this book. It had a lot of things I liked about it, but it could easily distract me from all of its good points with a number of bad ones. I guess it had a bit of a "Chicken Little" effect for me, where you're supposed to like the main character, but you're not really sure why. Don't get me wrong, Albert is a very unique character, but every time he did something that made me laugh or relate to him (and trust me, I can relate to this character), he either thought or said something that made him come off as a REALLY whiny jerk or a REALLY big weirdo. I kind of get that that was the point, but there are times that I thought it crossed the line. Sometimes he was great to listen to, and other times, he just came off as unlikable. I also think that the world around Albert was way too mean spirited. I think I found myself cringing throughout this book more than I was laughing. This guy can't walk out onto the street without getting some form of verbal abuse. The way he is treated in school and in public, even before all the nonsense with Ryan, is just ridiculous! Again, is this supposed to make us like him more? The guy gets berated for standing in line... or just...breathing. Yes, he's the intentional loser, but to say he transcends all this and this is his treatment? I always thought it was just bizarre that he just brushes all this off. I'm in high school, and, like I said, I'm a lot like this kid! But sh*t like this does not happen! It also made it so when his treatment after bigger goof-ups (e.g. the Walk) seem moot. I got more of a disconnected punching bag in a universe full of complete a******s, rather than just your misunderstood teenager. Those were my big problems. What do I like? Well, I enjoyed Yoo's writing style. It's witty, it's quick, it sounds straight from a teenager's thoughts. I liked some of the characters, even though I thought Brett's friendship came out of nowhere and I felt like I was rooting for Ryan most of the time-- though maybe that was just because I didn't really like Albert. I enjoyed the interactions between Mia and Albert immensely, and I thought they played very well off of each other. I actually enjoyed the first third of the book the best, with the two just being wacky and opening up to each other. Yoo manages to make a bland setting like the Inn a really fantastic setting. Overall, I thought the book was an enjoyable read, though these problems really started to eat at me by the last third of the book. I'm going to try some of his other books, mainly for David Yoo's style and humor.

  • Ari
    2018-11-17 10:51

    I didn't like this book as much as I thought I would but I still enjoyed it. I think I was expecting more laugh-out-loud humor, but the humor here is more dry and you may miss some of the references and jokes. My biggest problem with Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before was Albert. It's not good when you don't like the main character. Perhaps I was like the rest of the kids at Albert's school, succumbing to the spell of The House. I thought Albert acted like an almost completely clueless jerk. I understand that The House was a jerk, I was Albert in wanting to shake Mia and get her to wake up on this issue. BUT Albert got so frustrated with Mia for just being a nice person and trying to help her ex-boyfriend (who she is still friends with). Some of Albert's jokes were in poor taste and at first it was amusing, after all in real life, people make awkward jokes in the wrong place at the wrong time. But Albert does this too often for my taste. Ultimately, I didn't have any sympathy for AlbertIt's a refreshing take on the classic first love story (with the whole ex having cancer thing), full of humour, confusion, odd characters and characters that you almost feel sorry for but not quite. I would have liked to see Albert have more endearing qualities, more of the negative stuck out in my mind than the positive. Albert and Mia as a "something" is charming, they have lots of inside jokes and they are both incredibly patient with each other. It was nice to read about Albert giving up on being an intentional loser, he came out of his shell and started to meet people. The group of friends he starts to make is an eccentric and merry group. Read this book for the cute unnamed relationship and ignore the clueless parents and try to keep from wanting to smack Albert (if you've read this book than think about the Cancer Walk incident. I was so mad at him for this!). The ending was unexpected and I appreciated that.

  • Chris Tsang
    2018-11-07 12:59

    My goodness, if I counted the times I laughed out loud while reading this book, it would be countless. I've never laughed so much while reading a book before.

  • Sam McGraw
    2018-11-14 12:46

    Albert Kim is living the loser's life at Bern High, and he is having some major social issues. But, he finds this amazing girl who just happened to break up with her jock boyfriend, and things seem to be working out. This, to me, sounds like a somewhat typical viewpoint of a high school guy. I believe that David Yoo, the author, wrote this story so he could relate some of the problems he faced growing up as an Asian American in an American high school. The entire story is aimed towards teenagers that face the same problems such as dating, making and keeping friends, and keeping up with school. The author's view on things in a high school setting was slightly pessimistic, but that is explained by Albert in the story. Albert, page 7: 'My parents' desire to keep me busy and miserable isn't so much the result of their wanting the best for me, but rather their immaturely wanting me to experience what it was like to be them when they were my age so I can feel sorry for them.' Albert's parents grew up in Korea, and have very different views as to what is and is not acceptable in an American household. As mentioned before, David Yoo is Asian as well, so it is safe to assume that he probably experienced many of the same difficulties as Albert did in the story.The main theme for the book is probably, 'You don't always get what you want, but if you try sometimes, you get what you need.'-Mick Jagger. Albert is always wishing for something that's impossible to accomplish: 'My fantasy dream girl at the time was an animated mouse, Mrs. Brisby from THE SECRET OF NIMH, so it actually worked in Mia's favor that she was so adorably mousy looking.' Albert, page 98. The author is trying to get the point across that if you want something good to happen, you either have to be assertive and get it done yourself, or be incredibly lucky. Albert just happens to meet and start dating Mia as a stroke of luck, but even still he has to work to even become friends with her. It didn't just come naturally. Before Albert met Mia, he didn't talk to anyont at all, and he refused to have an kind of social life at all. Thus, he had no friends, a negative outlook on everything, and got rejected from everything at school. After he worked to become friends with Mia, he gained a circle of friends, and he attended more social gatherings. David Yoo is straining to tell readers that they have to be the ones to jump start their life, they can't just wait for good fortune to plop itself into your hands. You have got to start it yourself, otherwise, what will you have done to deserve a sudden good turn of events?The main style that the story was written in was a pessimistic, love-struck, teenage male who was stuck on the bottom of the social chain. The book was almost more of a narration of what David's thoughts and feelings were at the age of 16 than an exposition or description. The book does somewhat describe a more modern lifestyle and school setting, along with family life and social hierarchy. 'During sixth period Shauna now regulary hijacked Mia away from me so Mia could watch her smoke cigarettes in the girl's locker room and listen to her prattle on about how sl**ty the freshman bi*c*es all were, etc.' Albert, page 276. Now, I am not saying that we have this problem at all high schools, but I know for a fact that some schools are plagued with substance abuse and questionable behaviors. Plus, that is a key to showing gossip and jealousy and how much of a role they play in teenage lifestyles. The author uses slang, profanity, and situations that are found in high sschools across the world to help young adult readers relate to Albert Kim's story. Albert is nervous about being alone in a hotel room with a girl, even though all they are doing is cleaning the room. Still, he reverts to swearing to let off steam. 'No fu**ing problem, just wait a go**amned second while I put my stupid-a** dust mask back on. There, now the cheap-a** mask is back on my face; now where the he** is this rat ba**ard table you need me to move, go**amnit?' Albert, page 51. Hopefully, the language would not be so strong in a similar situation for someone, but the message is clear: people get stressed when they are in an uncomfortable situation. In Albert's case, he isn't used to being around other people, especially a really hot girl in a hotel room. This just goes to show the reader that David Yoo wrote this book in the style of a teenage male struggling to become someone.Overall, I thoroughly enjoyed the book, but it doesn't make it into my all-time favorites' list. The book started off great and had a great introduction and exposition, but the plot started to lose steam about halfway through. David managed to wrap up the story fairly well, but he left a few loose threads hanging and I was wondering "What next?" I liked that the author used a more suburban slang when writing the book, and Albert had many of the same thoughts and feelings as an adolescent guy. One thing I didn't like was that Albert focused more on emotions and feelings rather than the physical aspect of growing up, but he still managed to keep me interested enough to read the story. If I could chang something about the novel, I wouldn't have Albert be such a social loser. I mean, Albert says that he is an international loser, and he has no friends whatsoever. I don't know anyone quite like that, so it is harder to relate to Albert that way, but other than that, David Yoo did a good job in writing Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before. This story reminded me of another one called Zen and the Art of Faking It, for in both cases, the main character starts out as a loser and slowly rises up to popularity in ways normally unimaginable. So, David Yoo tells readers why you need to do your own $%@& work, shows a litle bit of an American high school, and relates a hilarious story of an 'international loser' to bits and pieces of his own life. 'Regardless, I get to start this where I want to start it because, like I said, this is my story, and what is a story, really, but a narrator's defense?' Albert Kim, page 4. That's all, folks.

  • Shannon
    2018-11-16 08:15

    Overall, this book was a fun read. The writing style and plot of David Yoo's "Stop Me if YOU've Heard this One Before" shares a striking resemblance to that of Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian". Both present various tragedies through the humorous lens of a pessimistic adolescent. As a future English teacher, I would recommend this book to my students because it discusses so many of the problems young adults face. Social status, popularity, young love, first time employment, puberty, and the struggles that accompany the Asian minority within a community are various examples discussed throughout the novel. Some would argue that the presence of profanity and sexual content should discourage teachers from recommending this book. However, the content is not graphic nor does it discuss anything a high school student hasn't already learned about. The book generates plenty of discussion on a spew of topics that would be easily relatable to that of a young reader.

  • BAYA Librarian
    2018-11-12 11:05

    R While David Yoo is ridiculously fantastic at capturing the painful and irrational emotions of social hermit Albert Kim breaking his way into high school life with his first girlfriend, the plot of "Stop Me If You've Heard This One Before" feels overwritten with many superfluous details. The story takes place in the 1980s, made foggily clear by references that make the characters seem outdated and really pretentious about only listening to old bands and remembering "the good ol' days" that they weren't around to experience in the first place. Yoo would have brought the main story up to speed by incorporating cell phones instead of pay phones and using contemporary pop culture references. The main character, Albert, is a Korean-American who's Asian-ness only appears in his immigrant parents. However, Albert being a pariah probably has more to do with is race than Yoo lets on--which, incidentally, doesn't make any sense for a story set in the 1980s. The story feels like an amateur memoir with a too self-involved main character and no editing down of the story. Much of the story should have been condensed to bring up the pace and keep five months under 300 pages. In fact, there are a lot of references that are not important, for instance, Ryan's cancer walk being on Halloween has no bearing to the story, and the walk could have been on any other day of the week. Everything is embellished too much, and what is already a long plot is made unnecessarily longer with these superfluous details.R I tried really, really hard to make this a "wit caveat" review-because there are so few Asian American men writing for teens, and Yoo has an entertaining, edgy, self-deprecating tone that feels very genuine. I liked "Girls for Breakfast" (2005), and this one had potential-but it's too darn long at 320 pages (377 in galley form), with the kind of unnecessary repetition that crops up in the last few Harry Potter books (we watch protagonist experience something, then watch as protagonist runs into best friend and says what just happened-all over again.) Yoo nails the kind of over-analysis of "she said _____ to me, and then she touched my hand-what does that really mean?" that teens do, but he repeats this device so often that it gets really tiresome. There are so many nice moments and touches-like Albert's social circle of 6th graders who play nerdy games with him and idolize him, and the absolutely beautiful seen demonstrating Albert's lack of driving skill--but Yoo, who captured the feeling of the Asian American as outsider so nicely in "Girls for Breakfast," never addresses the inevitable and very real issue of Albert's ethnicity being a very real factor in his social exclusion. The references to 80s pop culture are entertain for those who've been there, but realistic touches like Mia scrambling for a pay phone to check on Ryan will puzzle and lose our current cell phone generation. At the core, there's a good book here--it's just covered with extraneous and not very entertaining filler.

  • Heather
    2018-11-03 06:52

    Rating A+Summary I've said before that I'm kind of a big fan of David Yoo's work and that, I believe, it's equally hard to write incredibly funny stuff as it is to write "poignant" or "dramatic" stories. And, travelling on that same road, Yoo one-up's himself with his sophomore novel, Stop Me If...This book is equal parts funny (actually hilarious), heart-breaking, and thoughtful. The characters were actually better drawn, more mature, than they were in Girls for Breakfast. For example, the protagonist in Stop Me If... makes some social mis-steps, but he knows when he's made those social mis-steps and makes strides to correct them. Also, Albert is more relatable because he's not entirely desperate (the idea that he just "gave up" on caring about high school is inspired and the observations he makes about his fellow students are beautiful), but he does still possess the capacity to make some very good friends--Mia for sure, but his neighbor and the neighbor's pals.As is Yoo's M.O. (if you can have an M.O. with two books), the narrator is Asian, it's not nearly as significant as it was in Girls for Breakfast, but still interesting. He writes a line that you can probably only get away with as an Asian writer, but the teenage protagonist is thinking about something his parents do to him and thinks, "Unfuckingbereavable." Is it wrong to laugh at that?I didn't actually like the ending of this book, the protagonist does something that I wished he wouldn't do (although I know in reality that no teenage guy is going to pass up the opportunity that Albert has at the end of the book), but even that wasn't enough to sway my good opinion. The story and characters, overall, are so spot-on, that this book was an A+ in my literary gradebook.You'll notice that this review is higher (slightly) than Girls for Breakfast and that's because Yoo didn't lose any of his wit or wisdom, and (as referenced above) brought a stronger protagonist and a more compelling story to the table this time. I recommend this book to anyone who loves to laugh while they think about high school politics and first love.

  • Alyssa N
    2018-11-02 12:02

    This book hurt in the way that I so badly wanted good things to happen for Albert in which gets the girl, finds social acceptance, and emerges from everything with a tremendous sense of inner peace. However, life doesn't really work that way and neither does much of this book. While Albert and Mia begin a romance on the heels of her traumatic break-up with lax superstar Ryan, the time is AWFUL when Ryan gets cancer and needs Mia's support. Eventually, he manipulates her and jealousy (on his part and on Albert's part) tears the budding romance apart. Mia is emotionally distraught most of the book and her naivety does nothing to help the situation. At various points, it feels like each of these three characters is using one another to fill some void...unhealthy, yet very realistic which is why this book somehow works for me.I appreciate Albert's punny, tortured, cringe-worthy inner monologue because it's impossible not to "get" the guy and why he's frustrated. Quite frankly, this story line could just end on a depressing, gut wrenching note, but Albert's humor and uncanny resilience keeps the reader invested and rooting for the best. I can honestly say, when Albert felt wounded or betrayed, so did I even if I recognized why others reacted the way they did. Near the end, Mia makes a monumental decision that made me stop reading and utter an anguished "whyyyyy?" alongside Albert while I now realize the decisions she made inevitably free her from Ryan (who I do not care for) in some capacity. No, it's not a tidy happy-go-lucky ending which is refreshing in a truly frustrating way. Upon reflection, Albert and Mia never really had a genuine, clean beginning because their relationship was insulated by a disconnected summer. Thus, the strange, throbbing hope that emerges at the end of the novel doesn't feel so much like a repeat of square one, but much more like the square one that should have happened. Overall, I appreciate Albert as my guide into this work and how he makes me stop and question stereo-typical culture in a way that shows each of us are on the "fringe" in some way, simply because we have decided there is a fringe to begin with.

  • Jennifer Wardrip
    2018-11-02 05:52

    Reviewed by Bookluver_Carol for TeensReadToo.comIf Albert Kim has learned one thing in his tragic adolescence, it's that God (probably a sadistic teenage alien) does not want him to succeed at Bern High. By the end of sophomore year, Al is so tired of humiliation that he's chosen to just forget girls and high school society in general, and enjoy the Zen-like detachment that comes from being an intentional loser. Then he meets Mia Stone, and all the repressed hormones come flooding back. Mia, his co-worker at the Bern Inn, is adorable, popular, and, most intimidating, the ex- long-term girlfriend of Ivy-bound, muscle-bearing king of BHS and world class jerk, Ryan Stackhouse. But - chalk it up to the magic of Al's inner beauty - by the end of a summer vacuuming hotel rooms and goofing off together, he and Mia are officially "something." Albert barely has time to ponder this miracle before the bomb drops: Ryan has been diagnosed with cancer, and he needs Mia's support, i.e. constant companionship. True, he's lost weight and he's getting radiation, but that doesn't make him any less of a jerk. And to Albert, it couldn't be more apparent that Ryan is using his cancer to steal Mia back. With the whole town rallying behind Ryan like he's a fallen hero, and Mia emotionally confused and worried for Ryan, Al's bid for love is not a popular campaign. In fact, it's exactly like driving the wrong way on a five-lane highway. STOP ME IF YOU'VE HEARD THIS ONE BEFORE was a funny, sad, and wonderful story all at the same time. Yoo really knows how to capture the reader and keep them hooked until the last page. Albert felt like a real teenage boy and his emotions were captured so well. The love between him and Mia grew gradually and I loved that. They didn't fall in love when they first met; their friendship grew into love. I really liked how Albert grew as a character and had a truly unique voice. Overall, I highly recommend STOP ME IF YOU'VE HEARD THIS ONE BEFORE. It's just such an engaging novel!

  • Becky
    2018-11-04 10:15

    The first time I met Mia we ended up in a hotel room by ourselves.Albert Kim is many things, but popular isn't one of them. He's more likely to be friends with the sixth graders down the street than his own classmates of either sex. More at home playing video games than interacting with real people. But the summer he gets his first job--as a janitor at a nearby inn--he begins to mature--slightly at least. One of his coworkers is Mia, a classmate who is popular and beautiful and utterly out-of-this-world amazing to poor Albert. The two have to work together every day. But that doesn't mean Albert acts like a rational human being when he's with her. Quite the opposite in fact. He's awkward. He's obnoxious. He's odd. Yet, as the summer continues on, they move past this extremely awkward phase and become comfortable with one another. True, he still has the maturity of a thirteen year old--despite the fact that he's several years older than that. (I want to say sixteen or seventeen, but I could be wrong.) But despite of it all, in spite of it all, Mia comes to like him...really like him. If only the summer would never end. But, of course, it does. And when it does, life becomes a lot more complicated for everybody. Albert has a choice: does he remain invisible and sullen and weird...or does he try to act like a 'normal' guy and actually interact with his classmates and try his best to make a friend (or two or three)? He tries...oh how he tries...but Mia and Albert are so very different. Can their summer-love make it through the year? Or will Mia's ties to the popular crowd (and her ex boyfriend) tear this young couple apart?The novel is humorous but heartfelt. With hundreds of embarrassing scenes...Albert is flawed but lovable...in many ways. Not all ways. I still see him as being immature and a bit dumb...but he's believable all the same. And it's always nice to get a guy's perspective in a romance.© Becky Laney of Becky's Book Reviews

  • Jon-michael
    2018-11-17 08:48

    The first time I met Mia we ended up in a hotel room by ourselves.Albert Kim is many things, but popular isn't one of them. He's more likely to be friends with the sixth graders down the street than his own classmates of either sex. More at home playing video games than interacting with real people. But the summer he gets his first job--as a janitor at a nearby inn--he begins to mature--slightly at least. One of his coworkers is Mia, a classmate who is popular and beautiful and utterly out-of-this-world amazing to poor Albert. The two have to work together every day. But that doesn't mean Albert acts like a rational human being when he's with her. Quite the opposite in fact. He's awkward. He's obnoxious. He's odd. Yet, as the summer continues on, they move past this extremely awkward phase and become comfortable with one another. True, he still has the maturity of a thirteen year old--despite the fact that he's several years older than that. (I want to say sixteen or seventeen, but I could be wrong.) But despite of it all, in spite of it all, Mia comes to like him...really like him. If only the summer would never end. But, of course, it does. And when it does, life becomes a lot more complicated for everybody. Albert has a choice: does he remain invisible and sullen and weird...or does he try to act like a 'normal' guy and actually interact with his classmates and try his best to make a friend (or two or three)? He tries...oh how he tries...but Mia and Albert are so very different. Can their summer-love make it through the year? Or will Mia's ties to the popular crowd (and her ex boyfriend) tear this young couple apart?The novel is humorous but heartfelt. With hundreds of embarrassing scenes...Albert is flawed but lovable...in many ways. Not all ways. I still see him as being immature and a bit dumb...but he's believable all the same. And it's always nice to get a guy's perspective in a romance.

  • Alex
    2018-11-10 09:56

    First off, I love that David’s Asian- Korean to be exact. Being Asian also, I can relate. He jokes about his parents and a lot of his nerdiness he blames on being Asian. He reminds me of Patti in Good Enough by Paula Yoo. They’re both Korean, hilarious, and with parents who care mostly about grades.Albert is one crazy character. At the beginning, he was really awkward- so awkward I’d physically wince when he opened his mouth to speak. But when he was with Mia, he became really cute and sweet and happy, if a lot desperate. Then he went psycho/desperate. And at the end he went back to being happy/sweet/cute. The changes were just a bit too much for me. Overall, Albert is a great character- hilarious, different, awkward, outrageous, spontaneous, and lovable. He’s also really strange and kind of out there; so much so that I actually got a little frightened of him. Still, he’s the epitome of the underdog nerd.Mia, the girl Albert falls for is very well rounded, as a character and as a person. She’s sweet but she also was a little annoying to me. She tries her hardest to please though.The supporting characters were great. Brett, a senior who becomes friends with Albert, is by far my favourite character. He’s quirky and lovable like Albert, but without the psycho-craziness. I never really knew what to make out of Ryan Stackhouse.However, I thought the ending was awfully rushed and quick. The book is going one way, and in the last few pages, it changes course. It’s a good ending and I was happy, but it was a little quick and the revelation at the end left me a little stunned.Overall, Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before is absolutely hilarious to read with an interesting and unique plot. Prepare to sigh, gasp, laugh and cringe throughout at Albert’s antics.

  • Mary
    2018-11-16 06:12

    As I read this book, I kept trying to remember why I ordered it. I think it was because there's a tie-in to Romeo and Juliet - although it's more a result of a few mentions by the narrator, Albert Kim, than any actual parallels in the story itself. In fact, Albert compares his own life and first love to Shakespeare's couple. Albert Kim is a Korean-American, high achieving, sousaphone-playing high school boy with no social life whatsoever except playing with a group of 6th grade neighborhood boys who share an interest in video games. The summer between his sophomore and junior years, he gets a job vacuuming rooms at a local inn, where he gets to know Mia Stone, who has just broken up with her boyfriend (Ryan Stackhouse) of three years. Albert is predictably awkward for someone who has cultivated a completely asocial personality as a result of moving around the country with his parents a few times, but still manages to establish a relationship with Mia by the end of the summer. As they return to school - Mia to her popular friends, and Albert to a sort of in-between status, she agrees that they have "something," though she stops short of defining it. Before too long, Ryan is diagnosed with cancer, and Mia devotes all her time to visiting him in the hospital and at home and helping to take care of him, leaving Albert confused and resentful. Ultimately, Albert ends up acting a bit psycho - but fortunately he's developed a friendship with a neighbor, Brett, who doesn't hesitate to be honest with him. This book is ok. It will be more interesting to high school readers than middle school, largely because the vocabulary is fairly advanced, so it won't be an easy read. Albert is smart and uses big words. Older middle school strong readers may find it interesting for its depiction of high school life.

  • Wendy
    2018-10-25 04:57

    I don't really bother summarizing plots in reviews, because a) others have already done so and b) I tend to read reviews AFTER I read the book, so I'm looking for opinions and insights rather than trying to decide whether or not to read a book. I don't even mind if the reviewer barely mentions the book, as long as I see how the book connects to whatever they're ranting about. So I write reviews for those like me.This was one of a few YA books I've read recently that were written in the 21st century but set way back when I was a YA myself. It makes me wonder what modern teens make of them--does it feel more like historical fiction than realistic fiction? Because I know I'm getting a fair number of cultural references that I can't imagine most teenagers would get. (Like the hilariously tongue in cheek acknowledgement directed at Phil Collins.) I'm going to be teaching high school this year after 13 years in middle school, and I have a feeling that while kids no longer listen to Phil or use pay phones, not much else has changed. Some of the painful bits in here--usually involving Albert doing something horribly stupid yet somehow understandable--are a good reminder of what it's like to be in high school. I think middle schoolers are more overtly cruel, but by high school kids have internalized the "rules" enough that they no longer need to be so obvious in how they're enforced. A few reviewers have complained about the lack of character development. I think most of us just inch forward imperceptibly, so it doesn't bother me that these characters don't break through into entirely new people in the course of months. The other facet that is commented on is the humor, and yes, I laughed out loud, hard, in public, several times while reading this.

  • Teen
    2018-11-04 06:14

    First off - I loved this narrator. Sure, he was so immature that he made you cringe much of the time. Just like you'll yell "Don't go in there!" to a girl in a horror movie you'll want to sew up Albert's tongue half the time: making him unable to do or say one of the hundreds of things he does or says throughout the book. I think that's what I loved so much about this book - it was such a spot on representation of how dumb and self centered some boys and girls can be at (ahem) some ages. The last 50 pages or so lagged and I'm not sure the ending was very satisfying, but it's worth checking out if only to read the first few chapters. The descriptions of Albert's physical reactions to being in the same room as a hot girl are some of the funniest most heartfelt bits of teen lit I've ever read. Besides the hot-girl-syndrome effects, my favorite source of comedy and pain in this book are Albert's trying to do well Korean parents. He's the first Korean-American in the family and Alberts shares some really great insights. Trying to pin down the time/setting for this book is difficult, but based on the music, clothing and attitudes, I'd set it in the mid-90s. I'm going to put a hold on Yoo's other YA book, Girls for Breakfast, right now!(JLR)

  • Shaya
    2018-10-26 12:49

    Stop Me If You Heard This One Before is the tale of Albert Kim who starts off high school deciding he's going to be an intentional loser. The summer before his junior year he takes a job at an inn and Mia, who is very popular and part of the "perfect couple", is his coworker. In the beginning Albert is a jerk which is a little hard to read through but then he figures out how to be nice and treat her well and by the end of the summer they are together. (She broke up with her boyfriend, Ryan) But then high school starts again and a few events threaten their unlikely relationship.I thought the book was very original and realistic. It doesn't contain many stereotypes and there are lots of plot twists that you didn't see coming. I wanted to hit Albert over the head on a number of occasions but his mistakes did make the book more believable. There is lots of humor! It's not quite my sense of humor but some parts made me laugh or at least smile. I give this book a 3 because the writing style didn't quite fit me. And for some parts of it I was waiting for the end to come. But the plot definitely shifted this from the "okay" to the "like" rating.

  • Patricia
    2018-11-02 05:11

    A great coming-of-age story of a Korean-American teen boy who is not very good at socialization, until he spends the summer cleaning motel rooms with a popular girl at his high school, who has just broken up with the jock leader-of-the-pack. She appreciates his weird sense of humor and they form a strong bond, and even become "something" when they go back to school- although her ex-boyfriend becomes jealous, and then he is diagnosed with cancer and although Albert does everything to be cooperative, Stackhouse manages to separate Mia from him; whereupon he goes back to being a silent invisible student, until he becomes very angry because he realizes that "House" is milking his illness just out of spite. But Albert has acquired some friends, and in the very end, after a total meltdown, he manages to form a bond again with Mia, at the high school dance. Ends on a positive note, just when you figure all is lost. Some mature content (sexual reverences. language) Very funny and poignant, too.

  • Doug Sacks
    2018-11-07 05:14

    Humorous and entirely believable. You root for Albert all the way, even in his lowest moments. Yes, boys do act this way... So vulnerable and so strong at the same time, both Mia and Albert are very human characters. I will say that the book is both sarcastic and serious and while I liked a lot of the humor, this direction often led to bland stereotypical secondary characters. Yoo's observations on high school dynamics are spot on and his asides about Albert's Korean parents were funny. Some may feel the happy ending was a let-down but I believe it shows the real side of how people react to life and how much they are willing to try and forgive and move on, thereby maturing. If anything, the ending was rushed for me and I feel that there was a white elephant in the room between Mia and Albert that got little attention, maybe that's for a future book or just for the reader to work out himself...

  • Alana Mcconnell
    2018-11-16 11:14

    This book is told in the perspective of a teenage Korean boy called Albert, who is an intentional loser. He meets Mia, a popular pretty and way out of his league girl at work over the summer. A relationship forms, and by the time school starts, they are officially "something". But then Mia's ex boyfriend Ryan gets cancer, and the whole town rallies up to support him, including Mia. Albert feels like Ryan is trying to steal Mia away from him, but since Ryan has cancer, Albert can't exactly say anything. I liked this book, even though at first it was hard for me to get into because I felt like the writer sort of blabbed on about things and I skimmed over a lot of the things I felt were unnecessary to the story. One thing I liked about the book was how I laughed out loud at a lot of the things Albert said and thought. I recommend this book to people, it's quirky and IPA good read.

  • Alex
    2018-11-15 05:47

    This has been moved back and forth on my to read pile, so when I finally started, I was very pleasantly surprised by this touching story of misfit Albert. Albert has figured out high school, if he just acts like he is not there then no one will bother him, and this works well for two years, until he has a summer job with the most beautiful girl in the school. As the summer wears on, they fall for each other, but since Albert has withdrawn so far into himself, he has no idea how toreact when they go back to school in the fall and everything has changed. Very humorous look at a late blooming high school boy (which might be why I identified with it so well) who falls in love. For some reason it is inexplicably set in the 90s and while i got most of the pop culture references, I am not show many of today's teens will.3 1.5 stars

  • Cecilia
    2018-11-08 13:12

    I could definitely picture Albert as an awkward boy trying to fit in to impress the girl. I appreciated his attempts at humor and winced as they fell flat with his audience. He tried hard to be the patient and understanding boyfriend as Mia nursed Ryan to health, and I wanted to knock some sense into Mia as she continually chose Ryan over Albert without fully realizing how it was damaging her relationship with Albert.I had expecting this to be a little funnier, and I am sad that it failed in that aspect. While Albert did make some weak jokes, his narration seemed a tad too serious with not enough humor. More of my review here

  • Hannah Goodman
    2018-11-12 04:51

    I just love David Yoo's characters. They always make me laugh. Albert Kim's struggle to fit in is hilarious and cringe-worthy. You see the tornado coming and you can't get out of the way so you just stand and watch the inevitable. I also like that the characters aren't stereotypes–particularly the popular girl that Albert has a crush on and then winds up in a relationship with.My only criticism is that I found the vagueness of the time period kind of distracting and the whole thing with the ex-boyfriend of the girl Albert has a crush on getting sick seemed a little over the top. But these things didn't detract from the over all story. With each of Yoo's books, I find myself wanting to read more and I can't wait for his next novel to come out!

  • Sofia
    2018-10-22 12:55

    Albert is set. Over the summer, he falls in love with his incredibly hot coworker, Mia, and lo and behold: even though he’s a loser who still plays with sixth graders, she likes him back! This is possibly the best thing to ever befall poor Albert, who’s had a difficult time fitting in at Bern High. His only problem now is Mia’s ex-boyfriend, who is not only extremely scary, but extremely popular. Oh, and he has cancer. And he wants Mia back. And Albert keeping her from taking care of him in his illness is making Albert look a little like a douche. Laugh out loud hysterical and surprisingly deep at times, Stop Me If You’ve Heard This One Before isn’t your typical misfit being launching into popularity story. It’s probably not one you’ll ever hear again, either.

  • KRISTI♫ ♪
    2018-10-30 08:56

    11 CHAPTERS IN: A hilarious book. Although it goes a little slow in the beginning and it's kinda boring, it gets A LOT better. It's so funny and I love how it's on the guy's point of view because not many romance books are on the guy's point of view. It's funny because you can read what the guys think of girls and all their thoughts. DONE WITH BOOK: Wow. INCREDIBLE. A very well-written book. I have to admit, it is a little fast but it's really really funny. I like how it's on a guy's point of view, it makes the book more guy-like but it helps you understand what the GUY goes through when he likes a girl, when he gets to go out with that girl, and when the girl breaks up with him. A MUST-READ! I LOVED THIS BOOK!

  • Sharon
    2018-10-17 07:12

    This story of awkward Albert Kim is somehow both hilarious and cringe-inducing at the same time. After accepting that he is an "intentional loser" at his high school, and vowing not to make social contact with anyone, Albert is forced into social contact through his summer job---and surprisingly, the beautiful, popular girl he ends up working with ends up falling for his unique sense of humor. Maybe this part is a little unrealistic, but the way Albert is ignored in the fall in favor f his new girlfriend's old, popular friends, and the way all his new attempts at social acceptance fall flat on their face, rings almost too true. I identified with it, I laughed, I almost cried---this is a wonderful, honest book for socially inept teens & adults and those who long to understand them.

  • Ana
    2018-11-04 13:15

    This novel had me hooked from the first page, his Romeo and Juliet analogy was the sincere perspective on it, not the type that's romanticized or sugar-coated. Which I may mention, it was definitely not. His unconscious yearning to belong in a crowd very abstract to him was honest, and his emotions were real. Overall, an interesting and intriguing novel in which Yoo successfully captures what its like to be a teenager, or even more-so an outsider, and crafts his pages with humour and an insightful view on the brain of Albert Kim, a character who is both bold, but at the same time immensely introverted.

  • Jennifer
    2018-11-02 08:11

    This is funny and cringe worthy at the same time. Awkward teen finds love, loses love and grows up just a little bit. So why the 4 stars, the characters are not cookie cutters and all have depth, you will laugh out loud, it is both sweet and realistic at the same time. All the characters are very solidly TEENS, they are both mature, and grown up at times while also being completely confused with no life experience at the same time. They reminded me of what it is like to talk to my own 17 almost 18 year old. I also love that the characters are mostly pretty middle class, not rich or poor and inhabit a true to life suburbia.

  • Bryan
    2018-10-24 06:06

    I thought this book was amazing. First off, this book is written by an Asian.. How amazing is that!? Also, the character is Asian, and that's also brilliant. The fact that the character is Asian, is that I can connect to the story better, because I have experienced what he had experienced. Or at least most of his experiences. This book has a great plot, and is a good read. It's about an Asian's kid's love life, and how it works out. Themes like, hatred, misunderstanding, and love are all present in this book. I would recommend this book to anybody who wants a good romance story through an Asian's eyes.