Read Women Among the Inklings: Gender, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams by Candice Fredrick Sam McBride Online

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The Oxford group of writers known as the Inklings met and thrived during the 1930s and 1940s. Three of the members, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams, became known as authors and cultural figures, recognized for interweaving Christian themes into fantasy fiction. Other members of the group doubtlessly influenced these works through their comments and discusThe Oxford group of writers known as the Inklings met and thrived during the 1930s and 1940s. Three of the members, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams, became known as authors and cultural figures, recognized for interweaving Christian themes into fantasy fiction. Other members of the group doubtlessly influenced these works through their comments and discussion, and the published ideas of Williams, Lewis, and Tolkien were probably first discussed within this circle. Every member of the Inklings was male, the group consciously excluded women, and it was formed to promote male companionship. This book examines the attitude of the Inklings toward women and thus, sheds new light on the lives and works of Lewis, Tolkien, and Williams. The book examines the male culture of the Inklings and the relation of the literary group to the larger Oxford community. It also looks at women in the lives of Williams, Tolkien, and Lewis. While Williams and Tolkien apparently thought of women as mythic icons, Lewis began to question some of the group's assumptions after his marriage. When considering the representation of women in fiction by the Inklings, the volume gives special attention to issues of gender and theology....

Title : Women Among the Inklings: Gender, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams
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ISBN : 9780313312458
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 224 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Women Among the Inklings: Gender, C. S. Lewis, J.R.R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams Reviews

  • Russell Fox
    2019-05-14 07:20

    This isn't a terribly well-written book--it's often dry, and some parts have the feeling of having been cut and pasted--but it covers some important information and provides some important analysis for anyone interested in the Inklings. Not only do the authors very thoroughly and sympathetically--but never uncritically--review all the major interactions these conservative, traditional, Christian, early 20th-century Englishmen had with women (and in the case of C.S. Lewis, that's a complicated story in itself!), but they subject all the female characters in their fiction to a thoughtful (again, always respectful, but never sparing) feminist analysis. The results are, in some ways, surprising: Williams's strange mixture of the Gothic and the mystical comes off looking quite good by 21st-century gender standards, Tolkien is revealed as exclusionary but not particularly retrograde (certainly no more than a great many other fantasy authors), while Lewis's fiction covers the widest range, including truly insightful (maybe even "progressive") readings of women in the context of fantasy and myth (most especially in Till We Have Faces), as well as positively misogynistic stuff in many of his shorter works and non-fiction homilies. Which itself is odd, since he had the clearest sense of any of the Inklings at just how popular his writings were among a certain class of English and American women! Anyway, conservative Christian fans of the Inklings will probably dislike much in this book, but both of the authors are professed Christians themselves, and it's important to see the limits of the Inklings' accomplishments in light of our way of understanding gender today, which obviously is light-years different from what existed at Oxford and Cambridge in the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. Not a great book, but an informative one.

  • Rachel Parent
    2019-05-20 08:25

    Read this quickly, focusing on the Tolkien sections, as I'm less interested in the other Inklings. I found this an interesting read, want to read more. I found the analysis and conclusions of the authors heavy-handed, to be honest, but I was excited to find anything written on this topic

  • Cynthia
    2019-04-28 07:18

    Wow. This book was amazing.

  • Amanda Patchin
    2019-04-30 07:09

    Some thoughtful exposition of problematic aspects of Lewis, Tolkein, and Williams unfortunately terribly buried under broad misinterpretations and wildly overdrawn conclusions.