Read Right of the Dial: The Rise of Clear Channel and the Fall of Commercial Radio by Alec Foege Online

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In Right of the Dial, Alec Foege explores how the mammoth media conglomerate evolved from a local radio broadcasting operation, founded in 1972, into one of the biggest, most profitable, and most polarizing corporations in the country. During its heyday, critics accused Clear Channel, the fourth-largest media company in the United States and the nation's largest owner ofIn Right of the Dial, Alec Foege explores how the mammoth media conglomerate evolved from a local radio broadcasting operation, founded in 1972, into one of the biggest, most profitable, and most polarizing corporations in the country. During its heyday, critics accused Clear Channel, the fourth-largest media company in the United States and the nation's largest owner of radio stations, of ruining American pop culture and cited it as a symbol of the evils of media monopolization, while fans hailed it as a business dynamo, a beacon of unfettered capitalism. What's undeniable is that as the owner at one point of more than 1,200 radio stations, 130 major concert venues and promoters, 770,000 billboards, 41 television stations, and the largest sports management business in the country, Clear Channel dominated the entertainment world in ways that MTV and Disney could only dream of. But in the fall of 2006, after years of public criticism and flattening stock prices, Goliath finally tumbled--Clear Channel Inc. sold off one-third of its radio holdings and all of its television concerns while transferring ownership to a consortium of private equity firms. The move signaled the end of an era in media consolidation, and in Right of the Dial, Foege takes an insightful look at the company's successes and abuses, showing the ways in which Clear Channel reshaped America's cultural and corporate landscapes along the way....

Title : Right of the Dial: The Rise of Clear Channel and the Fall of Commercial Radio
Author :
Rating :
ISBN : 9780571211067
Format Type : Hardcover
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

Right of the Dial: The Rise of Clear Channel and the Fall of Commercial Radio Reviews

  • Myke
    2019-04-16 05:01

    I went into this book more for information than in expectation of spectacular prose. I was not disappointed.Going in, I really had no idea as to Clear Channel's roots or really anything beyond their status as a corporate giant that turned radio into a carnival of bland crap. But now I know that the company started in Texas and pioneered the Advertisers Not Audience business model which is largely to blame for their output.There are some nice passages outlining the history of radio and some of the key players in various markets around the country--all stuff which is probably better-documented elsewhere, but the amount of perspective it brings to a pretty straightforward company bio is invaluable to keeping the reader's interest.If you are looking for a book that is going to mercilessly flog Clear Channel, you may have to look elsewhere. The author keeps a pretty diplomatic attitude toward the story, though his loyalties are obviously with the listeners--though he was sent a threatening letter before he even began writing the book warning of legal action should he get his facts wrong. And that was simply after his publicist sent Clear Channel advanced notice in request for interviews. So I imagine that colored his writing at least somewhat.CC is no longer the behemoth they were just a few years ago, so this book may not inspire the type of rage it may have when the company was at its peak. But it does stand as a good object lesson in corporate folly.

  • John B
    2019-04-12 05:20

    Poorly written, barely any editing, so the author goes round in circles and off down cul-de-sacs, and you just get dizzy trying to remember where you are. If an editor had had the chance to polish this dirge up somewhat, I think it would have been an interesting read. As it is, this is a dog's breakfast of a book - a shame, as the author clearly has done a considerable amount of research and has plenty to tell us.

  • Maya
    2019-04-13 04:05

    Never could get all the way through this. I would have expected to find this more interesting; I was aware of what was happening with Clear Channel at the time that they were buying up so many stations, and I'm generally interested in and saddened by the homogenization of commercial radio, but this was dull as dirt.

  • Peacegal
    2019-03-25 05:08

    Ever wonder why modern radio, in short, sucks? Foege puts much of the blame for the sea change in broadcasting on the huge conglomerate Clear Channel--and makes quite a convincing case. Don't expect a thrill-a-minute read, but this is essential reading for anyone interested in modern media or unchecked corporate growth.

  • John
    2019-04-25 01:09

    Too much of a morality play. I also think he skipped over the most interesting concepts a lot. But it has its moments for those interested in history of radio

  • Robert Eustace
    2019-03-29 02:24

    It was a very interesting story to the rise and sort of fall of the largest radio owner.