Read The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel: From Richardson to George Eliot by Leah Price Online

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The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel brings together two traditionally antagonistic fields, book history and narrative theory, to challenge established theories of "the rise of the novel." Covering British novelists from Richardson to George Eliot, this study asks why the epistolary novel disappeared, how the book review emerged, and how editors' reproduction of old texThe Anthology and the Rise of the Novel brings together two traditionally antagonistic fields, book history and narrative theory, to challenge established theories of "the rise of the novel." Covering British novelists from Richardson to George Eliot, this study asks why the epistolary novel disappeared, how the book review emerged, and how editors' reproduction of old texts has shaped authors' production of new ones. This provocative book promises to change the way we think about the future of intellectual property, and the role that anthologies play in the classroom....

Title : The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel: From Richardson to George Eliot
Author :
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ISBN : 9780521539395
Format Type : Paperback
Number of Pages : 236 Pages
Status : Available For Download
Last checked : 21 Minutes ago!

The Anthology and the Rise of the Novel: From Richardson to George Eliot Reviews

  • Erica
    2019-05-29 09:19

    Price thinks about how anthologizing and condensing literary works reflects on reader's assumptions about reading practices: what's worth reading, what's forgettable. She specifically focuses on the anthology and the novel--which are particularly uncomfortable friends. Best chapter is her last chapter on Eliot and Eliot's anxieties about her own quotability and how that makes her work peculiarly marketable, as well as aphoristic out of context. Really enjoyed this--I hope a similar impulse will invigorate my work as I try to write something about mass reading in the nineteenth century.

  • Lawrence
    2019-05-30 09:09

    Much is irrelevant to my own work, so I am in the strange position of having skimmed and skipped through a work largely about the reading practices of skimming and skipping, but I really enjoyed the parts that did touch upon the Gothic (and even those about Clarissa, which I haven't read, but have read *about* endlessly), so I expect I'll return to these ideas.

  • Margaret
    2019-06-12 05:00

    I didn't actually read the whole book, just one chapter. I like the way that she examines publication history, especially of particular authors such as George Eliot, to trace the development of the cultural cache of the novel. I hope to have time to read the rest at some point...